Cruise travel insurance

Avoid financial disaster at sea with cruise insurance that covers range of potential losses, even if you're a senior or have a pre-existing condition.

Cruise insurance delivers a lot more than a normal travel insurance policy, offering additional cover for a range of cruise-related losses including missed cruise departure, cancelled shore excursions, cruise delays and emergency medical transportation. The fine print of standard travel insurance policies means that you might be left with significant gaps in cover, so specialised cruise insurance (even if you're on a domestic cruise) can be an exceptionally good idea. Get quotes and compare cover to find the right protection without paying too much.

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  • You can filter your results to customise your cover!
  • Quotes are ordered by price
  • You can choose from Basic, Standard or Comprehensive Cover
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How is cruise insurance different to regular travel insurance?

Most international travel insurance policies will automatically cover cruise trips but these may not always cover you for cruise-related losses. For example, you might not be covered for medical emergencies while technically still in Australia. When you get cruise cover, either with a specialised policy or by adding a “cruise pack” to standard cover, you can find a lot of extra benefits.

Situation

How cruise insurance could help

You miss your cruiseYou will be covered for additional expenses if you are unable to attend, due to reasons such as a delayed flight or a car accident on the way to the port.
You need to cut your trip shortSay you're two weeks into a six-week cruise when you receive word that you need to return home for a family emergency. Cruise insurance can reimburse you for the cost of the remaining four weeks.
If shore excursions are cancelledIf the cruise liner cancels, due to a serious tropical storm for instance, you can be compensated and reimbursed.
You're confined to your cabinYou can receive a daily allowance (usually $50–$100 a day) if you are confined to your cabin for medical reasons, to help pay for room service and other expenses.
Your cruise is delayedIf your journey is delayed, whether on the way out or on the way back, you are able to get compensation for unrecoverable costs.
You need to cancel your tripIf something happens and you are forced to cancel your holiday before it even begins – if you get seriously sick, lose your job, there’s a death in the family or other similar situations – cruise travel insurance can cover your non-refundable trip costs so you don’t end up out of pocket.
Your baggage is lost or delayedYou’re there, but your luggage isn’t. If an airline loses or misplaces your luggage, cruise travel insurance can cover the cost of flying your bags to the next port, reimburse you for the cost of essentials you need to buy until your bags arrive and cover the loss if your bags are gone for good.
Your formal cruise attire is lost or damagedThis will provide cover for replacement or hire costs if your formal wear that you had planned to wear on the cruise is stolen, damaged or lost.
Your cruise liner goes bankruptWithout this type of cover, you might be left out of pocket and without recourse if a cruise line goes out of business before your trip. This type of cover might be missing from cruise cover sold by cruise lines, so it can be worth looking at other providers and read the fine print to make sure it's included in your policy.
Medical expenses if you become sick or injuredTypical travel insurance policies are designed for cover on dry land. However, accidents and illness can also happen at sea, and cruise trip insurance can cover costly medical expenses while on the ship at sea, onboard in port or while you’re on a shore excursion.
Emergency evacuation to a land-based medical facilitySerious events like heart attack or stroke might call for an emergency medical evacuation. Standard travel insurance policies might specify that they only cover the cost of repatriation to Australia, while cruise travel insurance can also cover emergency evacuation from the ship to the nearest hospital, as well as medical transport back to Australia when needed.
Your trip is interruptedWhat happens if you’re halfway into your cruise around the South Pacific when the ship develops a critical mechanical problem and the trip is cancelled? Cruise travel insurance covers you in a situation like this, whether it involves an unexpected detour, unwanted delays or even if the entire voyage has to be cut short.
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Is cruise insurance really worth it?

The Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) recommends that all Australians get travel insurance when heading overseas, and specifically suggests that you get full cover. As you weigh up your options, consider the following:

  • Cruise lines recommend you take out travel insurance. Most of the major cruise lines operating in Australia recommend you take out travel insurance with a standalone provider when purchasing your cruise trip. Some will offer their own policies but these often offer a more basic level of cover for a similar price.
  • Cruise holidays can be subject to cancellations. Travelling at sea can mean that you are subject to unexpected changes to the itinerary if the weather turns ugly. Cruise travel cover can ensure you are reimbursed for any cancellations of shore excursions or other expenses you paid for prior to travel.
  • What if you miss the boat? Missed planes, bad traffic and bad weather among other events may lead to you being late to the port. Ensure you are covered if you have to cancel your cruise or you miss the departure. You will also be reimbursed for the cost of transportation to your cruise line's first port of call.
  • Travel insurance policies from cruise lines are generally more restrictive. Some cruise lines offer their own insurance policies but be aware that these are usually far more restrictive in the events that will be covered.
  • You may need to leave the cruise for emergencies back home. You're two weeks into a six-week cruise in the middle of the Pacific and receive word your father has passed away. You will be covered for the cost of your return home from the next port of call and the unused portion of your cruise trip that you had to cut short.
  • Where will you be if something goes wrong? Cruises can take you to secluded locations without nearby airports, trips are often longer overall and extreme weather can lead to delays of days, instead of just a few hours.

But aren't I covered under Medicare or my private health insurance?

Even if you're staying in Australian waters, you'll only be covered by Medicare for medical losses that occur while cruising between domestic ports, if there is a Medicare-eligible doctor on board.

  • You are not eligible to receive Medicare benefits when travelling from an Australian port to an international port.
  • You are not eligible to receive Medicare benefits if travelling between two international ports.
  • Cruise lines are not required to have Medicare-eligible doctors on board.

How much could a medical emergency at sea cost?

The price of receiving treatment in a medical facility while on a cruise can be extremely high, often up to $5,000 a day. In 2015, Fast Cover reported a payout of $190,000 for a 72-year-old Sydney woman on a South American cruise following a spinal injury.

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What won't my cruise policy cover?

When shopping for cruise travel insurance, it’s vital that you read the fine print first to make sure you know exactly what you will be covered for. The following are generally not covered:

  • Incidents related to drugs or alcohol. The insurance company won't come to your rescue if you’ve done something reckless while under the influence of drugs or alcohol on your trip.
  • Medical claims while docked in an Australian port. You may be under Medicare’s “jurisdiction” here, and some providers will not cover you for medical events that occur while you are in an Australian port for more than 48 hours.
  • Claims in countries advised against travel. Most providers will exclude claims that have occurred in countries that have had travel warnings issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). Fortunately these regions are generally not on cruise itineraries.
  • Certain adventure activities. If you want to indulge in high-octane pursuits like BASE-jumping, skydiving and hang gliding, feel free – just be aware that most policies don’t cover these activities. If you’ll be doing these, it might be worth checking which activities are covered by different insurers.
  • Certain pre-existing medical conditions. These may be excluded, unless you’ve made a specific arrangement with the insurer. See the list below for conditions that won't usually be automatically covered.
  • Luggage left unattended. You will not be covered for lost or stolen luggage and personal items if you leave them unattended. You may also be required to take precautions, such as locking your room when you’re not in it.
  • Other common exclusions. Acts of civil unrest, war or terrorism that disrupt your holiday are usually not covered by travel insurance policies.

Can I get cruise travel insurance if I have a pre-existing medical condition?

As with taking out travel insurance for any trip, you will need to let your insurer know of any pre-existing conditions that you have. Depending on the insurer and the policy, if you have a medical condition it may:

  • Be automatically covered at no extra cost. Less serious pre-existing conditions are often no problem
  • Require you to provide more information to the insurer about the condition
  • Result in you paying a higher premium to get cover for that specific condition
  • Be excluded from your policy, in which case you're not covered

How your condition is treated may vary significantly between insurers so always read the Product Disclosure Statement and call your insurer if you're not sure of anything. Here is a list of pre-existing conditions and how travel insurance policies typically cover them.

Can I get cruise insurance if I'm pregnant?

Terms and conditions from insurance providers around pregnancy can vary, so it's important to read the fine print before signing away. There are some insurers that will cover women up to the 26th week of pregnancy, with a number of insurers offering cover until the 32nd week of pregnancy. If you are expecting, you can still purchase cover after the maximum gestation limit, but you will not be covered for losses related to the pregnancy. Some common exclusions applied for pregnancy include:

  • Complications that arise out of the pregnancy
  • Trip goes longer than the period of pregnancy permitted on policy schedule
  • Childbirth or healthcare of newborn child

Learn more about travel insurance for pregnant women

cruise ship out in open waters

Am I also covered for flights and time spent before, during or after my cruise?

Yes. Cruise cover is an additional level of protection for cruises, on top of the benefits of travel insurance. This means that you can still be covered for non-cruise losses such as car rental excess cover, loss of luggage and hotel cancellations. It also means you can be covered for flights and time overseas much like with other travel insurance. However, cruise cover can also work alongside your cruise arrangements by covering:

  • Flights overseas to the country that you are boarding your cruise from
  • The days that you spend in the country that your cruise leaves from
  • The following days in your "drop-off" destination
  • Flights back home after the cruise
  • Time spent overseas, whether as part of a scheduled port call, unscheduled port stop, at your destination or anywhere else as covered by your policy
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How am I covered for cancellation by the cruise company versus travel insurance?

When will the cruise company cover me for cancellation?

All cruise companies have terms and conditions in place around when you will be covered for cancellation. This will vary from one company to the next, but here’s an example from P&O Cruises:

Days prior to departure cancellation is madeCancellation charge applied
181 days or moreFull refund provided
180–76 daysDeposit amount charged
75–43 days25% of total fare charged
42–15 days50% of total fare charged
14 days or less100% of total fare charged

Will my travel insurance cover me for cruise cancellation charges?

Conditions will vary between insurers, although you will generally be covered if you have to cancel your trip due to:

  • The unforeseeable death, injury or illness of yourself, a relative, business associate or travelling companion
  • Jury duty
  • Your duty to stay in Australia due to emergency as a member of armed forces, police, fire, ambulance or nursing
  • You are made redundant and were unaware you were going to be made redundant when booking your trip
  • You have to stay in Australia due to natural disaster at your home or business on the day you leave
  • Your doctor advises you are unfit to travel due to a medical condition that has surfaced since you booked your trip
  • Cancellation due to medical reasons of a friend or family member. You will not be covered if you have to cancel your trip because a relative or travelling companion suffers a pre-existing medical condition.
  • Bad weather and unexpected circumstances. While conditions will vary, cruise companies generally require a minimum number of guests for shore excursions, so those excursions may be cancelled if that number is not met. Shore excursions may also be cancelled due to bad weather. In this case, the cruise company will usually pay a full refund.
  • What if I decide to cancel my shore excursion? This will vary between insurers. Generally, if you give 72 hours’ notice, a full refund will be provided by the cruise company. Cancellations within 72 hours may mean that a portion of the charge must still be paid to the cruise company.

What policy do I need if the cruise stops in multiple destinations?

The region you should choose for your policy will depend on where you are travelling to on the cruise. You will need to select the appropriate region for your cruise based on the destinations you are travelling to. Selecting the domestic cover option will not be enough as you will not be covered by Medicare or private health care on the cruise ship. Most insurers will recommend you select Pacific as your region if taking a cruise in Australian waters in order to be covered for emergency medical expenses.

  • Worldwide: All destinations (including Japan, USA, Canada, Africa and the Middle East).
  • Europe: Europe, Russia and the United Kingdom.
  • Asia: Asia (excluding Russia and Japan).
  • Pacific: New Zealand, Bali, South West Pacific and Norfolk Island.

You will be covered automatically for stopovers up to 48 hours. If you’re in a region for longer than 48 hours, you must ensure it’s also listed on your policy.

Am I covered for flights and time spent before, during or after my cruise?

Yes. Cruise cover is an additional level of protection for cruises, on top of the benefits of travel insurance. This means that you can still be covered for non-cruise losses such as car rental excess cover, loss of luggage and hotel cancellations.

It also means you can be covered for flights and time overseas much like with other travel insurance. However, cruise cover can also work alongside your cruise arrangements, by covering:

  • Flights overseas to the country that you are boarding your cruise from
  • The days that you spend in the country your cruise leaves from
  • The following days in your "drop-off" destination
  • Flights back home after the cruise
  • Time spent overseas, whether as part of a scheduled port call, unscheduled port stop, at your destination or anywhere else as covered by your policy

The actual cover provided for losses incurred prior to the cruise in Australia may vary between insurers, so it's best to check your Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) before travelling to know exactly what your cover includes.

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Should I bother with cruise insurance? Here are the pros and cons

Benefits

      • Spending a little extra when booking can save you a lot of money (and stress) in the long run.
      • Things can and quite often do go wrong on holidays and travel insurance can protect you against unforeseen problems. Whether it’s a missed connection, lost baggage or even an emergency medical situation, travel insurance can come in handy.
      • You’re safeguarded against financial loss. Travel insurance can help you recoup non-refundable trip costs when you’re forced to cancel your holiday.
      • Some cruise companies will not even allow you to travel without having travel insurance for the entire length of your holiday. Not only is cruise travel insurance a wise investment, it’s a necessary one.

Disadvantages

      • Some policies include limits on valuables, so if your expensive laptop or tablet gets stolen while travelling, you might not be fully reimbursed for those items.
      • Keep an eye out for exclusions. Most travel policies will not cover you in certain situations, for example if you’re behaving recklessly or participating in adventure activities, so make sure you know exactly what your policy includes.
      • Travel insurance will not cover changes to your trip itinerary unless it is for reasons outside of your control.
      • When examining the premium and excess you will have to pay, make sure the amount you are paying reflects the quality of the cover.
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How much does it cost?

To get an idea of what you may pay for cover, consider the example quotes for a 10-day cruise from InsureandGo in the table below, and how it can vary by age and cover type:

ProviderInsureandGoInsureandGoInsureandGoInsureandGo
PolicyCruiseCruiseCruiseCruise
RegionNew Zealand, Pacific and BaliNew Zealand, Pacific and BaliNew Zealand, Pacific and BaliNew Zealand, Pacific and Bali
Trip Duration10 days10 days10 days10 days
Cover TypeComprehensiveComprehensiveBasicBasic
Age of Traveller55755575
Price$53.08$133.21$31.34$87.50

*Prices are accurate as of March 2015 and are subject to change. Please use the quote engine above for the most accurate pricing.

Prices are dependent on a number of different factors including:

  • Your age
  • The destination you are travelling to
  • Any pre-existing medical conditions you may have
  • The duration of your trip
  • The type of policy and features chosen. Policy add-ons and features like upgraded coverage limits can affect the price
  • The number of people covered under the policy
  • The total cost of your trip
  • The activities you will be participating in while travelling
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Is there a minimum or maximum age for cruise insurance?

Can I get cover if I am a senior over the age of 65? Age limits may vary between providers but cover is generally available to anyone up to 100 years of age. That said, travellers over the age of 50 are usually required to pay a higher premium, and travellers over the age of 70 will usually be required to complete a manual pre-existing medical condition form before being approved for cover.

Can I get cover if I am under 18? If you are under the age of 18, your guardian may be able to purchase cover on your behalf.

Can I take out cover if I am already overseas?

Some Australian insurers will offer cover to Australians who are already overseas. There are some key points to be aware of if you are considering this option:

  • Some providers will require your trip to end in Australia
  • There is usually a waiting period of around five days applied for claims related to injury or illness
  • Excess may not be able to be removed

How do I choose between policies?

  • Is cruise travel automatically covered or offered as additional cover? Some providers will offer cruise cover automatically while others will charge an additional premium. Find out exactly what you are covered for and make sure the price matches the quality of cover.
  • What region do I need to choose? Yes, it may be boring to the point of being physically painful, but take the time to read the PDS thoroughly. Don’t be sucked in by the marketing slogans and flashy websites; read the policy booklet and examine what is covered. You’ll likely be visiting multiple countries on a cruise so check that your policy will cover you at every destination.
  • What won't I be covered for? “But I didn’t know it wasn’t covered” is an excuse that won’t fly with your insurer. If you’re an adventure junkie, does your policy cover things like skydiving and bungee jumping? If you’re planning on hiring a scooter or a motorbike at one of the ports you stop at, will this be included in your coverage? Also make sure that you check the medical coverage closely when determining what is excluded from your policy. Sort this out first and you won’t get caught out later.
  • Am I covered for emergency medical expenses and evacuation? Look for a policy with a high coverage limit on your medical care. You want to make sure your hospital bills are covered so you can get the best possible care. It also makes sense to look for a policy that covers emergency evacuation.
  • How much will I be charged for a claim? Travel insurance excess charges can vary greatly between insurers with some providers charging as much as $500 per claim. Know exactly what you will be charged and whether there is the option to remove the charge.
  • How have other people’s experiences with the insurer been? Hit the online forums to see what other people have to say about their experiences with cruise travel insurance.

More tips on comparing travel insurance policies

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Other questions you probably have about cruise insurance

If you’re still unsure about whether you need it

No. You can take out international single-trip or annual multi-trip cover. You will not be covered for the additional losses faced by passengers on commercial vessels.
A cruise is travel on sea, ocean or river by a boat, commercial ship or any other vessel.
The best thing to do is to read the fine print and speak to your insurer. Some policies won’t cover things like adventure activities or if you are pregnant, so you may need to look into adding additional coverage to make sure you’re protected.

When you’re ready to buy cover

Your best bet is to take out cover as soon as you have booked and paid for all or part of your trip. This way, you are covered if you are forced to cancel the trip or if the travel company or airline goes broke, allowing you to recoup your prepaid costs and deposits. Learn more about when to book travel insurance.
Travel insurance provides automatic cover for stopovers up to 48 hours. If your cruise stops in different regions for longer than 48 hours, you will need to ensure that region is also covered on your policy.
It will depend on the policy that you choose. There are a number of travel insurance policies that offer cover for one-trips while others will require your journey to end in Australia. You can compare one-way travel insurance options here.
If you’re heading overseas for an extended period of time, check whether or not you’ll be covered for cruise travel. Many insurers do not cover cruise travel as a standard option on their single-trip or annual multi-trip policies, which is why it’s important to check before you head overseas.
  • Unfortunately, most insurers will require for your trip to start and finish in Australia in order for cover to apply. There are some providers that offer "already overseas travel insurance", but most of those policies will require for your journey to end in Australia. If you’re an Australian expat currently living overseas and looking to take a cruise that does not start or end in Australia, there are still some options available to you:
  • Find a specialist insurer willing to provide cover even though you are already overseas
  • Take out cover with the cruise ship provider (conditions on providing cover to foreigners may vary between providers
  • Take out cover with a travel insurance provider based in the country you are boarding the cruise from

What am I actually covered for?

Contact your insurance provider to adjust the dates of your policy.
Most policies will cover you for missed departure and pay for any necessary additional accommodation and travel expenses if you miss the departure of your cruise for reasons outside of your control.
You will generally be covered for a period of 72 hours for loss of luggage from the time that you leave your residence to the time that you board your cruise. Conditions for when you will be covered may vary between insurers.
Most travel insurance companies will provide automatic cover for a range of activities including waterskiing, swimming, surfing, scuba diving, rowing and jetskiing. Most insurers will not provide automatic cover for open-water sailing. If you plan on doing this on your trip you may be required to take out additional cover.
Norovirus is an extremely common cause gastroenteritis. The close proximity of cruise ship passengers has led to a number of outbreaks in recent years. In December 2015, 182 passengers aboard the Explorer of the Seas cruise ship which was docked in Sydney fell ill to the virus. In the event you suffer Norovirus, travel insurance will cover you provided you are forced to cancel your trip before you board or cut your trip short.

Yes. Cruise cover is an additional level of protection for cruises, on top of the benefits of travel insurance. This means that you can still be covered for non-cruise losses such as car rental excess cover, loss of luggage and hotel cancellations.

It also means you can be covered for flights and time overseas, much like with other travel insurance. However, cruise cover can also work alongside your cruise arrangements by covering:

  • Flights overseas to the country that you are boarding your cruise from
  • The days that you spend in the country that your cruise leaves from
  • Days following in your "drop-off" destination
  • Flights back home after the cruise
  • Time spent overseas, whether as part of a scheduled port call, unscheduled port stop, at your destination or anywhere else as covered by your policy

What happens if something goes wrong?

  • Notify a member of crew immediately and seek appropriate medical attention via the cruise ship’s medical facility.
  • If necessary, you may be transported to the nearest land-based medical facility.
  • Inform your insurer as soon as possible about your condition and find out exactly what evidence may be required in order for your claim to be approved.
  • Obtain documentation from a representative of the crew.
  • Most insurers will cover you for costs incurred while you are confined to the cruise ship’s medical facility or your cabin until you reach the nearest port.
Most insurers will cover you for medical repatriation from your cruise ship if necessary. If possible, inform your insurer of your situation and try to find out what information will be required from you for your claim to be successful.
If the nature of your injury or illness means that you are confined to your cabin for a number of days, most insurers will cover the necessary additional costs to a maximum daily limit.
  1. Contact your insurer by phone, email or online chat.
  2. Obtain a claim form from the insurer’s website.
  3. Complete the claim form and send it to the insurer online or by mail with any necessary documentation.
  4. Provide any additional information the insurer may require to verify your claim.
  5. Wait for a response from the insurer.
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Ready to board? 3 tips for a safer trip

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Compare quotes for cruise travel insurance and purchase cover securely

Picture: Shutterstock
*Price accurate as of 22 June 2017, for a single 5-day cruise trip to New Zealand, for an individual aged 35. Cover for pre-existing medical conditions may require an additional premium. Please use the quote engine to obtain the most accurate pricing.

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77 Responses

  1. Default Gravatar
    GailannJune 15, 2017

    We are doing a Kimberley Complete land content travel 11 days and cruise up west coast of 10 days. Do we take out comprehensive or cruise insurance?

    • Staff
      JonathanJune 15, 2017Staff

      Hi Gailann!

      Thanks for the comment.

      Most standard travel insurance policies may include a cruise cover or can include a booster “cruise pack” which can be comparable to the benefits of the standalone cruise insurance. The choice between them would depend on your preferences on the core benefits and the price.

      It is recommended to request both quotes if possible so that you can compare accordingly.

      You can contact your chosen insurer to discuss which works for your circumstances.

      Hope this helps.

      Cheers,
      Jonathan

  2. Staff
    JhezelynJune 1, 2017Staff

    Hi Tony,

    Thanks for getting in touch with finder.com.au.

    I’m afraid that we do not have that information about an awful experience with them. If you would like to compare policies from the travel insurance brands in our panel, please enter your travel details like destination, age and dates of trip into the comparison form. You can filter your search results to display cruise specific policies by selecting the cruise setting in the left-hand nav.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,
    Jhezelyn

  3. Default Gravatar
    KayMay 6, 2017

    Doing a cruise from Brisbane to Freemantle with a stop in Alatou would this still be classed as a domestic cruise?

    • Staff
      ZubairMay 8, 2017Staff

      Hi Kay,

      Thank you for your question.

      As Alotau is located in Papua New Guinea so this will be an international cruise.

      Please make sure though to read the eligibility criteria, features and details of the policy, as well as the relevant Product Disclosure Statement PDS/T&C’s of the policy before making a decision and consider whether the product is right for you. If necessary, speak to the insurance brand to verify any details.

      Cheers,
      Zubair

  4. Default Gravatar
    JohnMarch 5, 2017

    My trip consists of two days in San Francisco and one night in Vancouver. These are followed by a cruise to Sydney. As the latter is the longest part of the holiday do I state that when filing for a quote.
    Thank you

    • Staff
      ZubairMarch 6, 2017Staff

      Hi John,

      Thank you for your question.

      If these destinations are prior to your cruise you will need to include them in your policy. Additionally you will need to include the international region of where your cruise will be spending most of it’s time.

      It’s a good idea to check with your insurer in regards to your specific trip.

      All the best,
      Zubair

  5. Default Gravatar
    MiltonMarch 1, 2017

    My wife and I are going on a South Pacific cruise which departs and returns from Sydney, however we fly to and from Adelaide. Does cruise insurance cover our flights as well?

  6. Default Gravatar
    mavisFebruary 27, 2017

    are there any companies in Australia that will cover cancer patients in remission. I’ll keep searching if there are

    • Default Gravatar
      ianMarch 21, 2017

      My cruise only goes around Western Australia, (Indian ocean, not the pacific). Is the cover still the same?

    • Staff
      ZubairMarch 27, 2017Staff

      Hi Ian,

      Thank you for your question.

      finder.com.au is a comparison and information service and we are not permitted to provide our users with personalised financial advice or product recommendations.

      Term and conditions vary among providers. You would be best to check your insurer’s product disclosure statement to get an idea about which areas are covered under which regions.

      All the best,
      Zubair

    • Staff
      ZubairFebruary 28, 2017Staff

      Hi Mavis,

      Thank you for your question.

      Unfortunately, we are not able to recommend a specific provider that will provide cover for your pre-existing medical condition. You will need to disclose the pre-existing condition prior to purchase the cover. Generally, insurers require medical assessment for cancer and determine whether you are in remission and how long that has been the case (6 to 12 months is often a minimum requirement). You may find our travel insurance for cancer page helpful.

      Additionally, there are two providers in our panel that can count all the pre-existing medical conditions:
      - InsureandGo do not automatically exclude any conditions and claim to assess all conditions on a case-by-case basis.
      - CoverMore may be able to cover you for an additional premium, subject to the outcome of a short medical assessment.

      Cheers,
      Zubair

  7. Default Gravatar
    nancyFebruary 17, 2017

    Is Pacific Region included Fiji,Venuatu,and new Caledonia?

    • Staff
      ZubairFebruary 20, 2017Staff

      Hi Nancy,

      Thank you for your question.

      Yes, Pacific region includes Fiji, Vanuatu and New Caledonia.

      To check the complete list of countries under the pacific region, please check with your chosen travel insurance brand.

      Cheers,
      Zubair

  8. Default Gravatar
    annieFebruary 10, 2017

    I want to go on a 10 day cruise alone, in October. My husband may be on dialysis in 3 months?? 12 Months?? I cannot find an insurance company to cover me in the event that I have to cancel because of his pre existing medical condition. Any suggestions please?

    • Staff
      ZubairFebruary 13, 2017Staff

      Hi Annie,

      Thanks for your inquiry.

      Unfortunately, we are not able to recommend a specific provider that will provide cover for your condition. Terms and conditions vary extensively among providers. Preexisting conditions are assessed on a case-by-case basis. You may find our travel insurance for dialysis article helpful.

      Additionally, InsureandGo do not automatically exclude any conditions and claim to assess all conditions on a case-by-case basis. CoverMore may be able to cover you for an additional premium, subject to the outcome of a short medical assessment.

      Cheers,
      Zubair

  9. Default Gravatar
    Hans-DieterFebruary 9, 2017

    evacuation cover ?
    cancellation cover ?

    • Staff
      RichardFebruary 9, 2017Staff

      Hi Hans-Dieter,

      Thanks for getting in touch. Please enter your travel details into the comparison tool above. Once you have done so you will be able to review the levels of cover offered by the brands in our panel, including cover for cancellation and evacuation.

      All the best,
      Richard

  10. Default Gravatar
    barryDecember 29, 2016

    Who would be the best to contact for a price of travel insurance on a cruise for my 60 year-old wife?

    • Staff
      JasonDecember 30, 2016Staff

      Hi Barry,

      Thank you for your enquiry.

      Please enter your wife’s travel details like destination, her age and duration of the cruise trip into the comparison form, which you can find above on this page, to get the cost or a quote from the travel insurance brands in our panel.

      You may click the green ‘Go to site’ button of your preferred insurer to head over to the their website or to apply online if you find a policy which fits your needs.

      I hope this helps.

      Kind regards,
      Jason

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