Finder makes money from featured partners, but editorial opinions are our own.

Travel insurance for pre-existing heart conditions

Here’s how to get travel insurance if you have a heart condition or had prior operations.

Heart conditions are treated just like any other pre-existing medical condition when it comes to travel insurance. Most insurers will ask you to take an online medical questionnaire where you can disclose the details of your condition. After you complete the questionnaire, the insurer will let you know if it can offer you cover.

Get your quote for travel insurance that considers all pre-existing heart conditions

Specialising in covering all pre-existing conditions – including heart-related issues like heart attacks, stents and those who have undergone pacemaker surgery – these brands don't have blanket exclusions and consider all heart conditions, including severe ones.

Travel insurance with heart condition cover. Compare your travel insurance quotes.

BrandAge limitHow do I get considered for my heart condition?Apply
Medibank Travel Insurance84You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Bonus
Get quote
Freely Logo99If you have a condition that is not on the list and you would like cover on an alternative policy, please chat with us in the app.
Bonus
Get quote
Zoom logo85You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
Fast Cover Logo89Unable to provide cover due to the ongoing uncertainty with COVID-19.
Finder AwardBonus
Get quote
Insure4Less Travel Insurance Logo70You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
Travel Insuranz Travel Insurance Logo70You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
insureandgo100You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Bonus
Get quote
Tick Logo100You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Bonus
Get quote
World2Cover Logo75You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
Covermore logo99You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Bonus
Get quote
Southern Cross LogoSCTI118You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Finder Award
Get quote
Travel Insurance Saver110Online medical screening assessment will determine if cover can be provided. Consider the PDS and TMD from TIS and if the product is right for you.
Get quote
Easy travel insurance logo84You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
122You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Bonus
Get quote
All agesYou can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.More info
All clear travel insurance logoAll agesYou can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
Australia Post99You can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.
Get quote
All agesYou can declare your condition and do a medical screening online. An additional premium may apply.More info
Travel with Kit Logo69It does not offer cover for heart or cardiovascular disease (CVD) if you have ever needed to see a specialist cardiologist.More info
Travel with Jane Logo69It does not offer cover for heart or cardiovascular disease (CVD) if you have ever needed to see a specialist cardiologist.More info

Note: This information was last updated August 2022

Back to top

What heart conditions are covered by travel insurance?

Heart-related conditions can include forms of heart disease and problems with blood vessels. Here are a few common heart conditions that can be covered by travel insurance brands in Australia.

Loading...

Loading...

How does travel insurance cover pre-existing heart conditions?

Although angioplasty is considered to be minimally invasive, if you've undergone angioplasty or had a stent fitted in your heart, insurers will class this as a pre-existing medical condition. You'll need to inform the insurer about it when you take out a policy.

You'll need to complete an assessment of your condition and provide the following information:

  • Reasons for the angioplasty procedure
  • Date of the procedure
  • Information about your lifestyle and how you're looking after your heart

Some insurers will completely exclude atrial fibrillation. However, there are travel insurance brands that provide cover on a case-by-case basis. You'll need to complete a medical assessment so the insurer can better understand your situation.

Cardiomyopathy affects approximately 1 in 500 Australians. There are several types of cardiomyopathy, the most common being a dilated or enlarged heart, which can lead to fatigue, shortness of breath, heart palpitations, fainting and even chest pains.

Since there are sevveral types, the insurer assesses cardiomyopathy on a case-by-case basis when you apply for cover.

You'll need to complete a medical assessment so the insurer can better understand your situation.

If you have suffered a heart attack, you can still get travel insurance cover. As with any pre-existing medical condition, you must declare it to your insurer at the time you take out the policy. Whether the insurer covers you and how much it costs will depend on the following factors:

  • Severity of the heart attack
  • Date of your heart attack
  • What surgical measures have been taken to prevent it from recurring

If you do receive cover, you'll likely have to pay an extra premium and deal with special conditions, limitations and excesses on your policy.

If you've sought treatment for heart palpitations but fail to disclose this to your insurance provider, insurers will consider your heart palpitations a pre-existing heart-related condition even though it may not seem serious.

Any heart conditions that arise on your trip as a result of palpitations will not be covered without disclosure.

Many travel insurance providers will not provide overseas cover of expenses relating to an automated implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD or AICD), and policies will specifically list it as a pre-existing condition.

This means standard policies may not cover any medical costs directly, or indirectly, related to the ICD, such as any other heart conditions that may be connected.

To get overseas medical cover for ICDs, you can do either of the following:

  • Make special arrangements with an insurer to get cover for this pre-existing condition at extra cost
  • Find an insurer that does not exclude ICDs in their policy, such as InsureAndGo

To make arrangements for ICD cover, you need to customise your policy around it at extra cost. This may let you get more flexibility, but can also cost more than finding a policy which includes cover for it by default.

It may be difficult to find travel insurance providers that cover ICDs. InsureAndGo is one of the few options available and has a range of benefits for travellers with pre-existing conditions such as options for unlimited medical cover, and does not require testing requirements prior to getting cover.

If you receive cover for any of these conditions

You may have to pay an extra premium or deal with special conditions, limitations and excesses on your policy.

Back to top

How can I get covered?

Loading...

Loading...

Back to top

Why do I need to declare my heart condition?

Travel insurers need to assess your premiums accurately

It is vital that you declare your heart condition when you take out a policy as it is considered a pre-existing condition. An insurer's aim is to provide you with cover for an agreed level of risk and without disclosure of a pre-existing heart condition, the provider is taking on extra risk that they did not agree to. After you declare certain conditions, insurers will assess whether they will cover you as well as decide on the appropriate premiums if they do agree to cover you.

Insurers can void your cover if you do not declare

Although it seems like a shortcut to lowering your premiums, if you don’t declare your heart condition to your insurer and you have an incident on your holiday that is related to the heart condition, then you will not be covered for any medical treatment or hospital expenses incurred because of it. If you're in a country such as Japan or America, where healthcare is extremely expensive, then you'll be facing a huge bill that you'll have to pay yourself.

Example: Matt's $2,400 check-up

Having booked his long-awaited European holiday, Matt was counting down the days until he would depart on his dream getaway. A couple of days before his departure, Matt visited his doctor for a heart check-up after noticing an irregular heartbeat.

The condition was deemed non-life-threatening, and although Matt was still awaiting test results, he headed off overseas without a care in the world. However, after a week in Amsterdam, Matt became hospitalised with hypertension (abnormally high blood pressure).

Although Matt was sure these expenses would be covered by his travel insurance, when he phoned his insurance company, he received a nasty shock. Since he had the check-up before his departure, he was classified as having a pre-existing condition which he did not tell his insurer about. The medical and hospital costs he incurred overseas were excluded from cover, leaving Matt severely out of pocket and completely broke.

Costs Matt faced

  • $2,000 in hospital stay expenses
  • $400 in medical treatment

Out-of-pocket costs

  • $2,400

Cover received from his travel insurance provider

  • $0

Reason

Matt did not disclose his heart condition once he found out about it.

* This is a fictional, but realistic, example.

This shows the importance of reading the fine print of an insurance policy's PDS to make sure you’re fully aware of what is and isn’t covered. It also acts as a crucial reminder of how vital it is that you notify your insurer of any changes to your circumstances–no matter how insignificant they may seem.

How do I declare pre-existing heart conditions?

Insurers offer different methods for you to disclose any pre-existing medical conditions and heart problems you may have. Depending on the insurer, you may have to do one or more of the following:

  • Undergo a phone assessment to answer questions about your health.
  • Fill out an online questionnaire.
  • Fill out and post or email a hard-copy form.
  • Undergo a face-to-face medical assessment.

Once you’ve provided all the relevant information concerning your health, your insurer will provide a written notice to let you know whether you will be offered cover. You’ll also be notified of any special conditions or exclusions that may apply to your policy and of any premiums you are required to pay before cover will take effect.

What questions will I be asked about my heart condition when I declare it?

Typically, you'll be asked for the following information:

  • Medications you take to treat your heart condition
  • If you've changed your medication recently (e.g. in the last 90 days)
  • If you've recently seen a medical practitioner (e.g. in the last 90 days)
  • If you've recently been admitted or undergone treatment in a hospital (e.g. in the last 12 months)
  • If you're currently awaiting a medical review or treatment
Back to top

Travel tips for people with a heart condition

  • Planning makes perfect. You can still enjoy a wonderful, safe holiday if you have a heart condition. The key to a stress-free trip is to plan ahead. Make sure to consider all aspects of your condition and plan for each stage of the trip to make it run as smoothly as possible.
  • Choose wisely. Always keep your condition in mind when choosing your destination and the type of holiday you want to have. Relaxing in the shade on a tropical beach could be perfect, but trekking at high altitude could be a big mistake.
  • Take more than you need. If you’re on regular medication, prepare for the worst and take extra supplies with you in case your travel plans are interrupted.
  • Stretch it out. Make sure to stretch regularly on long flights to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis.
  • Get it in writing. Before you travel, ask your doctor to put together a letter detailing your condition, the treatment you have received and the medication you have been prescribed.
  • Tell your friends. Make sure that everyone travelling with you knows about your condition. It could save your life in an emergency situation.
  • Stay on track. Just because you’re on holiday doesn’t mean you can take a break from your diet or your medication. Monitor what you eat and keep your fluids up at all times.
  • Take time to relax. With so much of the world to see and with so little time to see it, travel can be exhausting. Take time to sit back, relax and smell the roses every now and then.
  • Don’t forget insurance. If you’re travelling with a heart condition, travel insurance is essential. Take out a policy at the same time you book your holiday so that you can take advantage of cover if you need to amend your holiday plans.

man hiking on mountain

Important safety considerations when travelling with a heart condition

If you suffer from heart disease and decide to travel, make sure you are aware of the following:

Back to top

Will my credit card travel insurance cover my heart condition?

Many high-end credit cards come with complimentary travel insurance. If you pay for your trip with your card, you will usually be able to enjoy some form of travel insurance cover when you begin your getaway.

While this free cover is undoubtedly a bonus, as a general rule, most credit card travel insurance policies will automatically exclude cover for pre-existing medical conditions, so chances are your heart problem won’t be covered. Credit card travel insurance is usually quite limited when compared with normal travel insurance, including much lower limits on cover for overseas medical expenses, so shopping around for standalone travel insurance is crucial.

Back to top

*Information accurate as of August 2015. Subject to change

Frequently asked questions about insurance for heart conditions

More guides on Finder

  • Travel insurance and pacemakers

    Looking to travel with a pacemaker? Find out how to get travel insurance cover from Australian brands.

  • Travel insurance for dementia sufferers

    Can someone with Alzheimer's get travel insurance? This guide looks at purchasing cover for dementia and provides tips for travelling with a dementia sufferer.

  • Travel insurance for high blood pressure

    Looking to travel if you currently have or have experienced high blood pressure? Compare the right travel insurance before you go.

  • Travel insurance following stroke

    Looking to travel after having a stroke? Find out how travel insurance policies can cover prior strokes.

  • Travel insurance for disabled travellers

    Find out how disabilities affect travel insurance and read tips for travelling with a disability.

  • Travel insurance for Epilepsy

    Most insurers cover Epilepsy as a pre-existing medical condition however you must ensure that the variant of Epilepsy is covered by your policy. Read more.

  • Travel insurance for asthma

    Suffer from asthma and need travel insurance? It’s often easier than you think, provided you meet certain criteria and tell your insurer about your condition.

  • Travel insurance for cystic fibrosis

    If you suffer from cystic fibrosis and you’re planning a holiday, you may find it more difficult to find travel insurance cover, but if you plan ahead and apply for your cystic fibrosis to be included as a pre-existing condition, you may be able to find a travel insurer.

  • Mental health travel insurance

    This guide looks at mental illness, how insurers treat this pre-existing medical condition and provides tips on where to get insurance cover and advice.

  • Travel Insurance for cancer patients in Australia

    Can I get travel insurance if I have or have had cancer? This guide looks at the intricacies of getting cover for former and current cancer patients.

Ask a Question

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our 1. Terms Of Service and 6. Finder Group Privacy & Cookies Policy.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

16 Responses

    Default Gravatar
    julieSeptember 12, 2023

    Is it possible to get a travel insurance policy to cover a pre-existing medical condition only, or is cover only possibly available as part of a comprehensive policy?

      AvatarFinder
      GarySeptember 29, 2023Finder

      Hi Julie,

      Thanks for getting in touch. If I am understanding you correctly, you will need to take out a comprehensive travel insurance policy. Depending on your circumstances, it may be able to cover you.

      Regards,
      Gary

    Default Gravatar
    JamesMay 6, 2019

    Can you explain the benefits/cons to the Reciprocal Health Care Agreements provided to Aust travellers going overseas including their limitations

      Default Gravatar
      NikkiMay 7, 2019

      Hi James,

      Thanks for reaching out to Finder!

      Reciprocal Health Care Agreements are designed to provide essential medical services to the citizens of each country. This includes cover for the cost of medical treatment for:

      • Visitors from RHCA countries who travel to Australia
      • Australians who visit a country that has an RHCA with Australia

      Without the cover provided by an RHCA, you would have to meet any overseas medical expenses you incur out of your own pocket. This could potentially see you facing hospital bills of several thousands of dollars, so the RHCA is an important tool to help overseas visitors to and from Australia and agreement countries access the medical treatment they need. Check our guide to Reciprocal health care agreement (RHCA), to know what you’re covered for when you visit the country as listed.

      Hope this helps,

      Best,
      Nikki

    Default Gravatar
    IanFebruary 21, 2018

    I have just been diagnosed with Aortic Stenosis, don’t have to use any medication. Can I get travel insurance?

      Default Gravatar
      LiezlMarch 7, 2018

      Hi Ian,

      Thanks for reaching out to finder!

      Yes, even with your heart condition, you may still get a travel insurance. You have to declare your condition and undergo medical assessment though. You may contact any of the insurer listed above.

      Additionally, InsureandGo does not automatically exclude any conditions and claims to assess all conditions on a case-by-case basis. Similarly, Allclear considers all pre-existing conditions. Also, CoverMore may be able to cover you for an additional premium, subject to the outcome of a short medical assessment.

      I hope this information helps.

      Cheers,
      Liezl

    Default Gravatar
    LynnJuly 13, 2017

    My son is 34 years old and had valve cleaned blood infection MRSA. The doctor from the cardio clinic said he is fine to travel. Do I have to pay more insurance and how much more extra would it be?

      AvatarFinder
      RenchJuly 16, 2017Finder

      Hi Lynn,

      Thanks for reaching out to us.

      There are some insurers that will cover people with heart conditions. You’re actually on the correct page on where you can compare your options and where you can get a quote.

      Insurers offer different methods for you to disclose any pre-existing medical conditions and heart problems you may have. Depending on the insurer, you may have to do one or more of the following:

      – Undergo a phone assessment to answer questions about your health.
      – Fill out an online questionnaire.
      – Fill out and post or email a hard-copy form.
      – Undergo a face-to-face medical assessment.

      Once you’ve provided all the relevant information concerning your health, your insurer will provide a written notice to let you know whether you will be offered cover. You’ll also be notified of any special conditions or exclusions that may apply to your policy and of any premiums you are required to pay before cover will take effect.

      On the table above, you may click on your preferred insurance to see more details then you may click on the green ‘Get Quote’ button to request a quote from them.

      Best regards,
      Rench

    Default Gravatar
    RoseFebruary 10, 2017

    My 78 year old husband has a gallstone diagnosed 1 year ago but not blocking bile duct so would he be covered if taking a cruise to a pacific Islands. Thanks

      AvatarFinder
      ZubairFebruary 14, 2017Finder

      Hi Rose,

      Thank you for your inquiry. I’m sorry to hear about the medical condition of your husband.

      Your husband can still get travel insurance when taking the cruise. You just have to disclose the pre-existing condition or medical problems to your chosen insurer prior to purchasing the cover.

      If you wish to learn more, we have a guide that talks about travel insurance for gallstones. On that page, you should learn more about how to get travel insurance when you have gallstones or a history of it.

      On the same page, you should also be able to see a form that you can fill out. Provide the necessary details and select the “Get my quote” button. You would then be presented with a list of travel insurance brands based on your given details. Compare them based on various details and select the “Go to site” button (if available) to be redirected safely to your chosen insurer’s website. You can then proceed with the purchase of your policy or get in touch with their representative for further enquiries.

      Moreover, there might be two providers that you might be interested in:

      InsureandGo do not automatically exclude any conditions and claim to assess all conditions on a case-by-case basis.
      CoverMore may be able to cover you for an additional premium, subject to the outcome of a short medical assessment.

      While looking for insurers, please make sure you read the terms and conditions of the policy to learn more and know if it is the right policy for you or not.

      I hope this helps. Should you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to reach us out again.

      Have a wonderful day!
      Cheers,

      Zubair

Go to site