High Credit Limit Credit Cards

Looking to make some big purchases? Compare credit cards that offer credit limits as high as $100,000.

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Name Product Bonus points Rewards program Rewards points per $ spent Purchase rate Annual fee
Citi Rewards Card - Balance Transfer Offer
N/A
Citi Rewards Program
1
21.49% p.a.
$49 annual fee for the first year ($149 p.a. thereafter)
Save on interest with 0% p.a. on balance transfers for 30 months with no balance transfer fee. Plus, a $49 first-year annual fee.
Qantas Premier Platinum
80,000
Qantas Frequent Flyer
1
19.99% p.a.
$225 annual fee for the first year ($299 p.a. thereafter)
Earn 80,000 bonus Qantas Points when you spend $4,000 in the first 3 months, 80 bonus Status Credits on eligible spend and a reduced first-year annual fee.
HSBC Platinum Credit Card
N/A
HSBC Rewards Plus
1
19.99% p.a.
$29 annual fee for the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter)
Save money with a 0% balance transfer rate for 36 months (with no BT fee), a first-year annual fee discount and free travel insurance.
Suncorp Clear Options Platinum Card - Exclusive Offer
25,000
Suncorp Bank Rewards Program
1.25
20.74% p.a.
$64 annual fee for the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter)
Receive a 0% balance transfer rate for 24 months and a reduced first-year annual fee. Plus, 25,000 bonus Suncorp Credit Card Rewards Points.
Citi Rewards Card - Points & Gift Card Offer
90,000
Citi Rewards Program
1
21.49% p.a.
$49 annual fee for the first year ($149 p.a. thereafter)
Receive 90,000 bonus Citi reward Points (worth $400 in gift cards) and a $100 Coles eGift Card when you spend $3,000 in the first 90 days.
Bankwest Zero Platinum Mastercard
N/A
14.99% p.a.
$0
Get 0% p.a. on balance transfers for 26 months (with a 2% BT fee), ​an ongoing $0 annual fee and 0% foreign transaction fees.
Citi Premier Card
130,000
Citi Rewards Program
1
21.49% p.a.
$150 annual fee for the first year ($300 p.a. thereafter)
Enjoy 130,000 bonus points (worth $450 in eGift cards) when you spend $4,000 within the first 90 days. Plus, a first-year annual fee discount.
ANZ Frequent Flyer Black
120,000
Qantas Frequent Flyer
1
20.24% p.a.
$425
Collect 120,000 bonus Qantas Points and $200 back when you spend $3,000 in the first 3 months. Plus, complimentary lounge passes.
St.George Amplify Signature - Qantas
90,000
Qantas Frequent Flyer
0.75
19.74% p.a.
$279
Get 90,000 bonus Qantas Points when you spend $6,000 using your new card within 90 days from approval and 2 Qantas Club lounge invitations per year.
NAB Qantas Rewards Signature Card
110,000
Qantas Frequent Flyer
1
19.99% p.a.
$295 annual fee for the first year ($395 p.a. thereafter)
Earn up to 110,000 bonus Qantas Points (90,000 when you spend $3,000 in the first 60 days and 20k after 12 months).
St.George Amplify Platinum - Qantas
60,000
Qantas Frequent Flyer
0.5
19.74% p.a.
$99
Earn 60,000 bonus Qantas Points, plus enjoy 0% p.a. on balance transfers for 15 months with a 1% BT fee.
ANZ Platinum Credit Card
N/A
0% p.a. for 17 months, reverts to 20.24% p.a.
$0 annual fee for the first year ($87 p.a. thereafter)
Receive a 0% purchase rate offer for 17 months and a $0 first-year annual fee. Plus, complimentary overseas travel and medical insurance.
Bankwest Breeze Platinum Mastercard
N/A
0% p.a. for 15 months, reverts to 9.9% p.a.
$0 annual fee for the first year ($69 p.a. thereafter)
Get 0% interest on purchases and balance transfers for 15 months, a $0 first-year annual fee and no foreign transaction fees.
Westpac Altitude Platinum Card
130,000
Westpac Altitude Rewards
1
20.49% p.a.
$49 annual fee for the first year ($150 p.a. thereafter)
Get 130,000 bonus Altitude Points (worth $450 cashback) when you spend $3,000 in the first 90 days, a 0% balance transfer offer and a $49 discounted annual fee.
Westpac Altitude Platinum Qantas
60,000
Qantas Frequent Flyer
0.5
20.49% p.a.
$149 annual fee for the first year ($200 p.a. thereafter)
Get 60,000 bonus Qantas Points when you spend $3,000 within 90 days. Plus, a first-year annual fee discount and a 0% balance transfer offer.
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Compare up to 4 providers

If you want the flexibility of a higher limit, there are banks and credit card providers in Australia that offer maximum credit limits of between $20,000 and $100,000. As well as offering high credit limits, these credit cards are usually gold, platinum or black options that also include premium extras such as rewards, complimentary insurance and concierge services.

Use this guide to compare credit cards with high credit limits and find a card that will fit your spending habits.

Compare high credit limit credit cards

To check out cards side by side and see more details, tick the "Compare" box.

What are high credit limit cards used for?

A card with a high credit limit can be useful if you're planning to spend a lot or if you want to consolidate a large amount of debt onto a card with a balance transfer offer. The flexibility to pay for more purchases also makes high credit limit credit cards useful if you want to earn more reward points.

While these cards increase your borrowing power, it's important to remember that you have to repay everything you've charged (plus interest if you don't pay it in full by the end of the statement period). If you struggle to repay your balance in full each month and have a tendency to overspend, a credit card with a high credit limit might not be good for you.

Applying for a new card vs. requesting a higher credit limit

If you are happy with the features and fees that come with your credit card but simply want more spending freedom, you could request a credit limit increase instead. After you're approved, you would keep the same card and be able to spend more.

Types of credit cards offer high credit limits

There are many different credit cards in Australia that offer high credit limits, including:

  • Gold, platinum and black credit cards

These premium credit cards are designed for big spenders and high income earners and usually offer larger credit limits. They also offer more extra features such as rewards programs, travel insurance, concierge services and airport lounge access.

As premium cards usually charge high annual fees and interest rates, they're best suited to people who pay their balance in full each month and take full advantage of the extra perks.

  • High credit limit balance transfer cards

If you're thinking of transferring a debt to a card with 0% on balance transfers, you need to make sure that the new card has a large enough credit limit to support your balance. Depending on the card, you may be able to request a balance transfer worth between 70% and 100% of the approved credit limit.

If your debt exceeds this balance transfer limit, you won't be able to transfer the entire amount and the remaining debt will stay in your old account. If you have a large credit card debt, consider this when comparing cards and requesting your preferred credit limit.

  • Charge cards

Charge cards are not technically credit cards because you have to repay the entire outstanding balance each month. But this setup means they don't have a credit limit or pre-set spending limit.

So if you have large and regular purchases in mind and always repay your balance in full, a charge card could give you greater financial flexibility than a credit card with a set credit limit.

  • Business or corporate cards

If you want a high credit limit to help with your business cash flow, a business or corporate card will generally offer a higher credit limit than a personal card.

These cards also offer other features designed especially for business owners, such as additional cards for employees, itemised statements and integration with MYOB, Quicken, Microsoft Excel or other accounting software.

What should I think about before getting a card with a large credit limit?

  • Your spending habits

    Before you request a credit limit increase or apply for a credit card with a high credit limit, consider the credit limit you would need to support your regular spending without tempting you to overspend.

    If you regularly repay your balance in full, a credit card with a high limit could help you manage your expenses and give you extra spending power in the case of an emergency. But if you don't always repay your balance in full, a high credit limit could be an unnecessary temptation that could lead to debt.

  • Eligibility

    Your income, expenses, credit history and Australian residency status can all impact whether or not you're approved for the card and what credit limit you'll get. Before you apply for one of these cards or request a credit limit, check your credit score and make sure your credit history is in good standing.

  • Interest rates

    The potential risks that lenders face by providing high credit limits – plus rewards and other perks – mean that these types of cards often have high interest rates. But there are some low rate cards that also offer high maximum credit limits.

    If you want the flexibility of being able to pay off purchases over a longer period of time, make sure you consider this cost. You can sort the comparison table on this page by purchase interest rate to find the lowest rate option, or compare other low rate cards.

  • Annual fees

    Most credit cards that offer high maximum credit limits charge an annual fee. This could be less than $100 or more than $400 depending on the card. You can weigh this cost against the potential value you'll get from the card's features – such as rewards or a balance transfer offer – to help decide if it is worth it.

High limit credit cards can suit you if you regularly spend on credit and repay your debt in full each month. As with any card, you should always spend responsibly and only spend as much as you can afford to repay – regardless of your credit limit. Before you apply for a card or request a higher credit card limit, consider your personal circumstances and compare your options. You could even calculate a credit limit that will work for you before making any decisions.

Frequently asked questions

Can a high credit limit credit card affect your credit history?

Your credit report shows the credit limits of your current products (such as credit cards or loans). It will also show if you have applied for a credit card or credit limit increase. Having a high credit limit could impact your borrowing capacity when you apply for other products. If you regularly repay your balance in full and don't have any defaults, having a high credit score can positively impact your credit history and demonstrate your responsible borrowing habits.

Is there such thing as a no limit credit card?

No. All credit cards have a credit limit. The closest alternative is a charge card, which has no pre-set spending limit. This is because you are required to repay your entire balance in full each month in order to keep your account. Your purchases are approved on an individual basis that is based on your repayment history, your purchase history, and your financial position, including your assets.

What happens if I spend beyond my credit limit?

If you spend beyond your credit limit, you won't be able to use your card to make any other purchases until you've paid off some of the balance. Some cards will also charge a fee if you spend beyond your credit limit. If your debt is close to the credit limit and you attract interest on the balance, this could also tip over your credit limit.

Since June 2012, banks are required to contact you when your credit card is getting close to its limit. This should give you a reminder that you need to make a payment or perhaps stop spending for a while so you can get it back down again. The easiest way to avoid exceeding your credit limit is to ensure that you always make regular repayments off your account. This will help keep your balance under control and avoid tipping you over your credit limit.

Is it good to have a high credit limit?

Not necessarily. Ideally, your credit limit should fit with your financial circumstances and spending patterns. If you don't spend a lot with your credit card, you may not need a high credit limit.

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