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Android phone plans

Do you have a new Android phone? Here’s what you need to know to find the right plan for your Android handset.

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The Android operating system was launched in 2008 by Google and has since been the core operating system of millions of smartphones, making up about 80% of the smartphone market currently. While its biggest competitor is Apple iOS, it's hard to compare the two, since Android phones are designed and manufactured by dozens of companies, while Apple's phones are made by only one.

Start your search for an Android phone plan here

Because there are so many Android devices to choose from, choosing the best Android phone plan for your needs can be a difficult decision. By default, we've selected the Samsung Galaxy S20 and S10 models as the most popular amongst Finder users, but if you want to look at a different model, you can pick it by clicking "Filter Results" and then "add more" under the Phones column.

More on the Android operating system

The vast majority of smartphones released in Australia these days run Google's Android operating system. While manufacturers often take the opportunity to add their own embellishments to the user interface, the fact remains that Android is the dominant OS when it comes to Australian smartphones.

The other player in the market is Apple's iOS, which is exclusively available on Apple's family of iPhones, from the iPhone 11 to the iPhone SE. Apple isn't the only company that marries the software to the hardware though, with Google creating flagship Android phones like the Pixel 4.

Android and iOS users have long been divided about which operating system is superior. While the choice is a personal one, we thought we'd point out a couple of the reasons why you might favour Android instead:

  • Multiple phone options. Unlike Apple's iOS, which only runs on Apple phones, there are dozens of phone companies that make handsets that run the Android system. This means that there are handsets of all shapes, sizes, prices and abilities to choose from.
  • Apps just work. The vast majority of apps function just fine on Android phones. You can buy or download Android apps through the Google Play store. While some apps are exclusive to Apple, you won't be missing out on much with Android.
  • Chromecast and shareability. Unlike Apple devices, you can pair Android devices with many different apps and platforms, including using Chromecast to add all sorts of functionality and sharing to your device.

Is an Android phone the best match for me?

Android phones are flexible in ways that other devices might not be. Given the sheer number of them on the market, you can usually find one that suits your budget and needs, which could be more difficult if you're restricting yourself to just iPhones.

You can access apps for whatever you need, and you can connect to tons of other devices. For these reasons, Android is a solid choice all round.

At the end of the day, it's really up to you which operating system you find the easiest to navigate and prefer using.

Want to see what's happening on the flip side? Click here to check out the range of Apple iPhone plans currently available.


Latest Android news

Best Android phones 2020

Best Android phones 2020

The Huawei Mate 20 Pro beats out the competition as the best Android phone you can buy in Australia right now, but it has plenty of competition. We've ranked the best Android phones money can buy Down Under. Read more…

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