auccf-luggage-card-250x250

What is credit card churning?

This controversial strategy involves applying for credit cards with bonus point offers, then cancelling them when you've been rewarded.

The general goal with credit card churning is to earn as many points as possible in a short amount of time, while also keeping your credit card costs down. In theory, as long as you meet the bonus point spend requirements, pay off the balance in full and cancel the card, you can avoid or limit the interest charges and annual fees.

However, credit card churning can lead to negative listings on your credit file, impact on your credit score and make it harder to get approved for new cards or loans in the future. So, before deciding if you want to collect points through churning, let's take a look at the finer points of this strategy.

How does credit card churning work?

While people who have successfully churned credit cards to earn more points usually have their own tips and tricks on what works, they usually follow a version of the steps below:

  1. Compare credit card offers. Typically, you would start by looking at the current reward and frequent flyer offers on the market. This helps you find bonus point offers that suit your rewards goals. As well as the bonus point spending requirements, most people that churn credit cards also look for offers that include a $0 annual fee in the first year.
  2. Apply for the card. Once you've chosen a card or cards, carefully read through the eligibility requirements. It can also be a good idea to look at your credit score before you apply, as the more competitive offers tend to require higher scores. After that, you can usually apply online in around 15–20 minutes and if you're approved, should get your card within 1–2 weeks.
  3. Set calendar reminders. Credit card churning requires precise timing to get the bonus points and avoid extra costs. So, most people using this strategy recommend that you set three different calendar reminders: one for the minimum spending deadline, one for your repayment due date/s and one for your card's anniversary (which is when the annual fee is charged).
  4. Meet the bonus point spending requirements. While spend requirements can vary between offers, people experienced at credit card churning usually go for offers that have a straightforward requirement, such as spending $3,000 on eligible purchases in the first 3 months. This is because more-complicated requirements can be more time-consuming and increase the risk of interest charges or other costs. Check out our full guide to learn more about meeting bonus point requirements.
  5. Pay off the card's balance. To avoid interest charges, you would need to pay off the full amount owed on the card by the due date on your statement. If the spend requirement goes over a few months, you'd need to make sure you do this each month.
  6. Check your rewards account. If you've met the bonus point spend requirement, it could take a few weeks before the points land in your frequent flyer or other reward account. As a point of reference, most bonus point offers say you should allow 6–10 weeks from when you meet the spend requirements. After that, you might want to call your provider to follow up, as it's important you get the points before cancelling your credit card.
  7. Cancel your credit card. When you see the bonus points have landed in your rewards or frequent flyer account, you can cancel the card. The main goal here is to avoid paying the second-year annual fee, which would be charged 12 months from when you opened the account.
  8. Apply for another bonus point offer. If you're churning cards, you would typically apply for another introductory credit card offer after you cancelled the previous card. Each time you apply, an inquiry is added to your credit file, so some people who churn cards recommend waiting a few months between applications to help space them out.

What about credit card churning for balance transfers?

Sometimes the term "credit card churning" is used in reference to 0% interest balance transfer offers. In this case, you would get a balance transfer card and enjoy the 0% p.a. introductory period before transferring the debt to a new card that also offers 0% p.a. interest. The main difference between this and churning cards for points is that balance transfer offers last a lot longer than bonus point offers.

Potential risks of credit card churning

While the promise of thousands of bonus points can make it very tempting to churn credit cards, this strategy comes with some big risks and potential issues both in the short term and long term. Some of the pitfalls you may notice early on include:

  • Increased spending. Credit card bonus point offers usually require you to spend thousands of dollars within a set amount of time. If this amount is higher than what you usually spend on a credit card, it could have an impact on your budget or lead to interest charges.
  • Credit card fees. While some credit cards that offer bonus points may waive the annual fee for the first year, there is a good chance you'll have to pay account fees for some of the cards you get. This means you'll need to carefully calculate the value of the bonus points, compare it to the annual fee costs and decide if it's worth it to get the full value out of churning.
  • Credit card debt. Increased spending and account fees also lead to a higher risk of credit card debt. While the goal with churning is to keep rates and fees to a minimum, it often requires careful account management to achieve that. The more cards you get, the more difficult that may become.

couple on couch with blue credit card and laptop

Credit card churning and your credit score

One of the biggest potential issues with credit card churning is the way it can affect your credit score. This is because each time you apply for a new card, meet the bonus point spend requirements, then cancel the account, you're adding details to your credit history that could hurt your credit score. This includes:

  • Multiple inquiries from lenders. Whenever you apply for a new credit card (or other loan), an inquiry is listed on your credit file. A lot of inquiries in a short amount of time can have a negative impact on your credit score because it suggests you're shopping around for products. In the worst-case scenario for lenders, it could show someone is desperate for credit. What's more is that each inquiry can stay on your credit file for up to five years, so any potential lenders will be able to see how frequently you're applying for new credit cards or loan products.
  • Decreasing the length of your average credit account history. When you open an account, your credit file will show it as active and record details of activity (such as repayments and defaults). It also shows when an account is closed. While accounts that have been open for a long time that have good repayment history are usually seen favourably, those that are closed soon after opening can have the opposite effect. This is because it can suggest instability and a lack of financial commitment.
  • Eliminating cards with good repayment history. With comprehensive credit reporting (CCR), details of your repayments may be included on your credit file. If you regularly pay off your account on time – which is the goal with credit card churning – this is seen as positive information that could improve your credit score. But cancelling those cards once you have the bonus points means that this information is no longer relevant, so it could actually hurt your credit score in some cases.
  • Changing credit limits. Every time you open a new credit card account, your credit limit is added to your credit file. Lenders may consider the total amount of credit you have access to when they are looking at new applications. If your access to credit has been going up and down while you open and close accounts, it suggests instability that could hurt your credit score and/or your chances of getting approved for new credit products in the future.

Is credit card churning worth it?

Credit card churning requires careful planning and management if you want to get the most value out of each bonus point offer. You'll also need to carefully monitor your credit file and credit score to avoid declined applications down the track.

For some people, collecting points that can be used for flights, upgrades and other rewards may be enough to justify the effort involved in churning cards. But if it sounds like a big ask, then it's probably better to compare frequent flyer credit cards and find one that offers a good mix of bonus points and ongoing features so you can stick with it beyond the honeymoon period.

Compare credit cards with bonus points on sign-up

Rates last updated February 20th, 2019
Name Product Bonus Points Rewards Program Rewards Points per $ spent Purchase rate (p.a.) Annual fee Product Description
Qantas Premier Platinum
100,000 bonus points
Qantas Frequent Flyer
1
19.99% p.a.
$149 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($299 p.a. thereafter)
Get 70,000 bonus Qantas points when you meet the spend criteria and 30,000 more after the first year (100,000 total). Ends 30 April 2019.
American Express Westpac Altitude Platinum Bundle - Qantas
75,000 bonus points
Qantas Frequent Flyer
1
0.5
20.24% p.a.
$99 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($249 p.a. thereafter)
Up to 75,000 bonus Qantas Points when you meet the criteria with this dual Visa (issued & serviced by Westpac) & Amex (issued & serviced by Amex).
Virgin Australia Velocity Flyer Card - Bonus Points Offer
60,000 bonus points
Velocity Frequent Flyer
0.66
20.74% p.a.
$64 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter)
Earn up to 60,000 bonus points in the first 3 months and save with a $64 first year annual fee. Plus, a long-term balance transfer offer.
Westpac Altitude Platinum Card - Qantas
60,000 bonus points
Qantas Frequent Flyer
0.5
20.24% p.a.
$50 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($200 p.a. thereafter)
Earn 60,000 bonus Qantas Points when you spend $3,000 within 90 days of card approval. Plus, a $50 first year annual fee.
NAB Qantas Rewards Signature Card
90,000 bonus points
Qantas Frequent Flyer
1
19.99% p.a.
$295 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($395 p.a. thereafter)
Collect 90,000 bonus Qantas Points when you spend $4,000 within 60 days of account opening. Plus, a $295 annual fee in the first year.
American Express Velocity Platinum Card
50,000 bonus points
Velocity Frequent Flyer
1.25
20.74% p.a.
$375 p.a.
Receive 50,000 bonus Velocity Points and enjoy complimentary lounge passes, a domestic return flight and insurance covers.
American Express Explorer Credit Card
50,000 bonus points
Membership Rewards Gateway
2
20.74% p.a.
$395 p.a.
Get 50,000 bonus Membership Rewards points, a yearly $400 Travel Credit and 2 entries per year to the Amex Lounge.
St.George Amplify Signature
200,000 bonus points
Amplify Rewards
1.5
19.49% p.a.
$179 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($279 p.a. thereafter)
Enjoy up to 200,000 bonus Amplify Points (100,000 each year) when you spend $12,000 p.a. for the first 2 years. Plus, complimentary lounge passes.
St.George Amplify Platinum - Online Offer
100,000 bonus points
Amplify Rewards
1
19.49% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($99 p.a. thereafter)
Get up to 100,000 bonus Amplify Points (50,000 each year) when you meet the spend requirement over 2 years with a $0 annual fee for the first year.
Citi Signature Qantas Credit Card
50,000 bonus points
Qantas Frequent Flyer
0.5
20.99% p.a.
$248 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($444 p.a. thereafter)
Receive 50,000 bonus Qantas Points, 2 yearly airport lounge visits and complimentary travel insurance. Plus, a discounted first year annual fee.

Compare up to 4 providers

Images: Shutterstock

Back to top

Amy Bradney-George

Amy is a senior writer at finder.com.au with more than 10 years experience covering credit cards, personal finance and various lifestyle topics. When she’s not sharing her knowledge on money matters, Amy spends her time as an actress.

Was this content helpful to you? No  Yes

Related Posts

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy and Privacy & Cookies Policy.
Ask a question
Go to site