Pregnant traveller

Travel Insurance for Pregnancy

Pregnant and planning a trip? Compare travel insurance that covers pregnancy up to 32 weeks.

The first question you probably have is, Can I get travel insurance if I'm pregnant? The answer is Yes! Many travel insurance companies provide cover for up to 32 weeks of pregnancy. Read on to find out how different insurers cover pregnancy.

Columbus Direct Travel Insurance Pregnancy Extension

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Columbus Direct Pregnancy Extension

If you are pregnant, Columbus Direct offer a pregnancy extension that can be added to the policy. This extension provides cover from the 26th week of pregnancy for unexpected pregnancy-related complications, childbirth and care of new-born during the trip, provided:

- Your trip does not extend beyond the 30th week of pregnancy

- You're not travelling against the advice of your doctor or midwife

- There have been no complications with your pregnancy

- It's not a multiple pregnancy

- The pregnancy did not result from assisted reproductive programmes

Note: if you have any non-pregnancy related medical conditions you will need to apply for this extension by phone

Get quoteMore info

How is pregnancy covered by different travel insurance brands?

The table below lists the maximum age these insurance brands will cover pregnant women for during various stages of their pregnancy. You should contact the company to find out what this cover includes, as many brands DO NOT cover premature birth and may only cover the hospital costs for the mother but NOT the baby.

BrandSingle Pregnancy Max WeeksMultiple Pregnancy Max WeeksPregnancy result of Fertility Treatment*Apply
  • 24 weeks
  • 19 weeks
  • Must complete a pre-existing medical declaration form
Get quote
AMEX Travel Insurance
  • 24 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not covered
Get quote
AIG
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not stated
Get quote
Blue Monkey Travel Insurance
  • 24 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not covered
Get quote
Budget Direct Travel Insurance
  • 32 weeks
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
Get quote
Columbus Direct
  • 25 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
Columbus DirectPregnancy extension
  • 30 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
CoverMore
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Must complete a pre-existing medical declaration form
Get quote
Downunder
  • 26 weeks
  • 19 weeks
  • Not stated
Get quote
Easy Travel Insurance
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not covered
Get quote
Fast Cover
  • 23 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not stated
Get quote
Go Insurance
  • 20 weeks
  • 16 weeks
  • Not covered
Get quote
InsureandGo
  • 32 weeks
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
Get quote
Insure4less
  • 18 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not stated
Get quote
iTrek
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
MultiTrip Travel Insurance
  • 32 weeks
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
Get quote
No Worries Travel Insurance
  • 26 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
Online Travel Insurance
  • 23 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not stated
Get quote
Over 60 Travel Insurance
  • 23 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not stated
Get quote
Simply Travel Insurance Logo
  • 26 weeks
  • 19 weeks
  • Must complete a pre-existing medical declaration form
Get quote
Skiinsurance.com.au
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
Southern Cross
  • 20 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not stated
Get quote
STA Travel Insurance
  • 23 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
Tick Travel Insurance
  • 32 weeks
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
Get quote
tid-logo-blue
  • 26 weeks
  • 19 weeks
  • Not covered
Get quote
Travel-insurance-saver-logo,png
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Not covered
Get quote
Travel Insuranz
  • 18 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
Virgin Money
  • 23 weeks
  • Not covered
  • Not covered
Get quote
Woolworths Travel Insurance
  • 26 weeks
  • 19 weeks
  • Not covered
Get quote
Worldcare Travel Insurance
  • 26 weeks
  • 19 weeks
  • 26 weeks
Get quote
youGo
  • 26 weeks
  • Not stated
  • Must complete a pre-existing medical declaration form
Get quote

*Maximum weeks you can be pregnant if your pregnancy is the result of a fertility treatment

Zika virus warning for pregnant travellers

Since 2016, DFAT has issued a warning for pregnant women travelling to Central and South America due to the outbreak of the Zika virus. If you are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant, DFAT advises that you consider postponing your trip as the Zika virus has been causally linked to the birth defect microcephaly, the medical term for babies being born with abnormally small heads.

Things to consider when it comes to pregnancy and travel insurance

Depending on your medical history and your current health, as well as on how far into the pregnancy you are, you may or may not be able to get cover for your trip. You should therefore look into whether you will be able to get pregnancy travel insurance before you book your trip, to ensure there are no surprises in the event of a claim.

Some important considerations when it comes to travel insurance for pregnancy include:

  • Do you have to pay more for cover? It's possible to find reasonably priced travel insurance plans for pregnancy. However, travel insurance brands base the cost of cover partly on the level of risk and if you are travelling while pregnant you naturally pose a higher risk. Therefore the cost of insurance with cover for pregnancy is generally higher than the cost of standard travel insurance.
  • What is the maximum number of weeks into the pregnancy that is covered by the policy? When it comes to travelling whilst pregnant, there are a number of restrictions that you need to be aware of in relation to travel insurance. Your due date plays an important role in whether you can get cover or not. Most insurance companies cover for up to 26 weeks into the pregnancy, with some extending to 32 weeks. Many insurers will only insure you if you are planning to return home 8 weeks or more prior to your due date.
  • Are IVF pregnancies covered? Many travel insurance policies exclude cover for pregnancies that were the result of IVF treatment.
  • Are you having twins? Just like IVF babies, many insurers exclude cover for multiple pregnancies.
  • Are you travelling against your doctor’s advice? Never travel against a doctor’s advice. In the event that a complication arises while you are travelling and the insurer discovers that you were advised not to travel by a certified medical practitioner, your claim will be rejected.
  • Have you ever had complications with a pregnancy? If you have experienced issues or complications with pregnancy in the past, you may not be able to find cover. Failure to disclose any past complications will result in any claims related to pregnancy being rejected by the provider.

Travel insurance for pregnancy – common conditions

Each policy will have a section on pre-existing medical conditions that are either automatically covered or not covered under the policy. Pregnancy is a condition that falls into both groups depending on the stage of pregnancy that you are in.

Wait, pregnancy is a pre-existing medical condition?

When you buy a travel insurance policy, pregnancy is classed as a pre-existing condition. This means that you’re legally required to disclose your pregnancy to an insurer during the application process.

However, you’ll need to check with your insurer to find out whether it will still provide cover for your pregnancy, as some insurers classify pregnancy as an automatically covered pre-existing condition and others do not.

For example, many insurers will cover a single, uncomplicated pregnancy up to a specified limit of gestation, such as 26 weeks. Other insurers may require you to complete an online medical assessment before approving your application, but will still allow you to purchase cover.

But there are some providers who will simply refuse to cover pregnancy, so read the fine print closely before purchasing a policy.

When is pregnancy automatically covered?

Pregnancy will generally be covered if it satisfies the following criteria:

  • Complications that arise are unexpected
  • Trip for which the policy is being taken out for ends on or before 26 weeks of gestation
  • Trip does not arise out of treatment associated with reproductive programs such as in-vitro fertilisation (IVF)
  • If the above criteria are satisfied, no extra premium will be charged for pregnancy.

What is excluded from my pregnancy cover?

There are certain situations and circumstances when pregnancy simply will not be covered by your travel insurance. Your insurer may not provide any cover if:

  • You are beyond 26 weeks’ gestation (NB: as mentioned, some insurers provide cover up to 32 weeks’ gestation). If you have a multiple pregnancy and your insurer agrees to provide cover, this cover typically only extends to 19 weeks’ gestation
  • You have a multiple pregnancy
  • The purpose of your trip is to undergo fertility treatment
  • You have experienced pregnancy complications prior to your policy being issued
  • Your travel insurance claim is for childbirth or the care of a newborn child
  • Your pregnancy was conceived through assisted reproduction services such as IVF
  • You travel against medical advice
  • Your pregnancy will pass the maximum period of gestation allowed by the insurer during your trip
  • Your claim is for medical expenses incurred in Australia
  • Your claim is for regular antenatal care and routine pregnancy check-ups, for example standard ultrasounds, blood tests or pregnancy tests

Please note that the above list of exclusions is by no means a comprehensive guide to pregnancy cover exclusions. Some insurers will provide cover where others won’t, while in some cases it may be possible to remove specific exclusions by paying an extra premium or completing a medical assessment form.

For more information on when pregnancy is and isn’t covered, contact your travel insurer.

What are some excluded pregnancy complications?

When reading travel insurance product disclosure statements (PDSs), a common clause you’ll see is that pregnancies will only be covered if they’re uncomplicated. A complication is a secondary diagnosis that could adversely affect the pregnancy, and it can occur before, during or as a result of pregnancy. Some common pregnancy complications include:

  • Toxaemia (toxins in the blood)
  • Gestational hypertension (high blood pressure arising as a result of pregnancy)
  • Gestational diabetes (diabetes that arises as a result of pregnancy)
  • Pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure, swelling of hands and feet, and protein in urine)
  • Hyperemesis gravidarum (excessive vomiting as a result of pregnancy)
  • Ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy that develops outside of the uterus)
  • Placenta previa (when the placenta is in the lower part of the uterus and covers the cervix)
  • Placental abruption (when part or all of the placenta separates from the wall of the uterus)
  • Stillbirth
  • Miscarriage
  • Emergency caesarean section
  • A termination needed for medical reasons

As for whether or not these complications will be covered, once again you need to check with your insurer. In many cases, if complications exist before you apply for travel insurance then you may not be able to find cover. If complications develop after you have purchased a policy, however, you need to check with your insurer to find out which (if any) complications will be included in cover.

travel insurance pregnant (1)

What affects the cost of travel insurance for pregnant women?

The amount that you have to pay for your cover can depend on a wide range of factors and you should be aware that the cost can vary quite substantially from one provider and plan to another.

Some of the things that could affect the amount that you have to pay for your pregnancy travel insurance include:

  • The plan and provider you choose. The cover option you opt for will obviously impact how much you end up paying for cover.
  • Your age and general medical health. Your age and general medical health can affect the cost of any travel insurance cover and pregnancy travel insurance is no different. Each insurer will ask you to state any pre-existing medical conditions that you have during the application process. Conditions that are not automatically covered may be excluded from cover altogether or incur a premium loading.
  • Trip duration. The longer the trip, the more expensive the cover.
  • Trip destination. The actual location you are travelling to will impact the amount you pay for cover. Destinations that are considered to carry a greater degree of risk will carry a higher premium.
  • Additional cover. Most policies will offer additional cover options to ensure you get the right level of cover. Such cover options include things such as registration of high-value items for extra cover and winter sports cover.

More on what impacts the cost of travel insurance

Is it safe to fly while pregnant?

Flying while pregnant can be safe, as long as your pregnancy fulfils the following criteria:

  • You are in the second trimester (13-27 weeks) and are not experiencing any complications
  • You have consulted a certified medical practitioner and have been approved to fly
  • Your insurer has agreed to cover you if flying overseas (read your policy carefully)
  • Your airline has agreed to carry you (airlines have different policies regarding pregnancy)
  • Your pregnancy is not classed as high risk
  • You are not travelling to a country where vaccinations are required that could be dangerous to your baby (influenza vaccine is the exception)
  • You are not over 35 years of age and pregnant for the first time

You should avoid flying if any of the following criteria apply to your pregnancy:

  • You are in the last six weeks of your pregnancy (flying could trigger premature labour)
  • You are travelling to a destination where limited medical facilities are available (i.e. a third world country)
  • Your pregnancy is high risk (i.e. you are experiencing cervical problems, vaginal bleeding, a multiple pregnancy, gestational diabetes, high blood pressure, preeclampsia, abnormalities of the placenta, or have had a prior miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy or premature labour)
  • You are flying long distance and have had a DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) in the past

General conditions from airlines for travelling when pregnant

Carriers have different policies regarding pregnancy and flying and you will need to find out whether your airline will carry you while pregnant and what conditions must be met. The following is a summary of how the three main Australian carriers view pregnancy and flying:

Virgin Australia

  • If you are 28 weeks pregnant or more, you will need a letter from your medical practitioner stating you are fit to fly
  • If you are experiencing complications, you will need a medical clearance in order to travel
  • If you are more than 36 weeks pregnant (single birth, flights over 4 hours) or more than 32 weeks pregnant (multiple birth, flights over 4 hours), you will not be accepted for travel
  • If you are more than 38 weeks pregnant (single birth, flights under 4 hours) or more than 36 weeks pregnant (multiple birth, flights under 4 hours), you will not be accepted for travel
  • If you are within 48 hours of your expected delivery time, you will not be accepted for travel

Qantas and Jetstar

  • After 28 weeks, you will need a certificate or letter from your medical practitioner confirming the pregnancy is routine and there are no complications
  • You can travel up to the end of the 36th week (single birth, flights 4 hours or more) and up to the end of the 32nd week (multiple birth, flights 4 hours or more)
  • You can travel up to the end of the 40th week (single birth, flights less than 4 hours) and up to the end of the 36nd week (multiple birth, flights less than 4 hours)
  • Medical clearance is required if you are having complications with your pregnancy
  • Medical clearance is required if you are travelling within 7 days of your delivery date

Tips for travelling when pregnant

Pregnant and planning a ‘babymoon’ before your life is turned upside down by the new arrival? Keep the following tips in mind to help you stay safe when travelling while pregnant:

  • Travel during the second trimester. Generally speaking, the safest time to travel during pregnancy is in the second trimester, provided that you don’t have any complications. This is the period when you’re hopefully past the worst of your morning sickness and when most travel insurers will still provide cover.
  • Check with your doctor. Before booking anything, check with your doctor to make sure it’s safe for you to travel. Even if you’ve already booked, it’s still a good idea to make a doctor’s appointment to check whether there’s anything you should avoid or any advice you should follow during your journey.
  • Be careful with medications. Be extremely wary of using any medications while pregnant, including those used to treat traveller’s diarrhoea. Only use medications prescribed by your doctor who is fully aware of your pregnancy.
  • Choose your destination accordingly. A secluded desert island in the middle of nowhere might seem like a romantic holiday spot, but it can quickly turn into a nightmare if you need urgent medical help. At the same time, if you plan on travelling to a developing nation you’ll need vaccinations from your doctor, but most vaccinations can be dangerous to unborn babies. With this in mind, make sure any destination you choose is suitable for you and your bump.
  • Take it easy. If you’re known for your keen sense of adventure, make sure you stay sensible on your holiday. Scuba diving, rock climbing and bungee jumping might all be normal holiday activities for you, but perhaps now is the time to be cautious. Ask your doctor for recommendations of activities you should and shouldn’t do.
  • Food poisoning. Take all reasonable steps to avoid food poisoning and other infections that may be harmful to your baby. Avoid dodgy street food, undercooked meats and any other eateries that look unhygienic, and drink bottled water if the quality of the local water supply is questionable.
  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Extended periods of not moving during long-distance travel can cause DVT, a condition which can potentially be very serious. Pregnant women have an increased risk of DVT in certain circumstances, so discuss travel plans with your doctor. Staying moving, doing frequent leg exercises and avoiding dehydration during long-distance travel can all help reduce your risk of DVT.

More tips on travelling while you're pregnant

When should expectant mothers buy travel insurance?

It is a good idea to start looking for your pregnancy travel insurance cover before you actually make any firm bookings with regards to hotels and flights for your travel. This is because the last thing you want to do is pay for non-refundable services only to find that you cannot get travel insurance for some reason or it is too costly.

Having said that, it is advisable to work out where and when you want to go, decide on your maximum budget for travel insurance cover and then start browsing travel insurance plans and providers to see what sort of cover and price you can get. If you find that you are able to get a good deal on suitable pregnancy travel insurance cover you can then go ahead and book your travel as well as your insurance cover.

Questions you may have about pregnancy and travel

Whether you're able to fly depends wholly on your personal circumstances. You should discuss your travel plans with your doctor prior to your departure. It is also important to check with both your carrier and your insurer to make sure you are compliant with their rules and regulations.

You’re overseas, 30 weeks pregnant and you have a travel insurance policy that covers you, but if you go into labour and the new bub arrives during your holiday will he or she be covered? That depends on the insurer.

There are many insurers who will not provide any cover for the cost of childbirth or expenses related to the medical care of a newborn baby. If you select such a policy and your baby is born overseas, keep in mind that you will most likely face extensive out-of-pocket expenses and, depending on where you’re travelling, may not be able to access the best possible level of care for your baby.

However, some insurers will provide cover if your baby arrives early, as long as your little bundle of joy is born inside the insurer’s maximum weeks of pregnancy permitted time limit. As always, check the PDS closely to read the full terms and conditions and contact the insurer directly if there’s anything you’re unsure about.

If you reach the 32-week mark halfway through your holiday, don’t expect your travel insurance to continue providing pregnancy cover all the way through until you return to Australia. In fact, many will refuse to provide any pregnancy cover for your trip unless you’re due to return to Australia before the gestation limit has been reached.

Once you’ve reached the insurer’s maximum coverable gestation, you will most likely be unable to claim for anything related to your pregnancy or its complications.

No. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to get travel insurance that covers standard medical appointments during your pregnancy. Even if you fell pregnant overseas, no cover is available.

Notify your normal doctor of your travel plans well in advance. He or she will be able to offer advice and recommendations on what you should and shouldn’t do on your holiday, and can also help you develop a care plan to ensure that your pregnancy continues to run as smoothly as possible.

If you’re advised against travelling by your doctor, the good news is that your travel insurance policy can provide cover for the cost of cancelling your holiday. This includes cover for any cancellation fees you’re required to pay, as well as any pre-paid deposits for accommodation, tours and the like that are non-refundable.

You can also take advantage of trip interruption cover from your travel insurer. For example, if an unexpected complication develops during your journey and treating doctors recommend that the best course of action is for you to return home and rest, travel insurance can cover the cost of your forfeited pre-paid expenses and also the additional flights needed to get you home safely.

No.In most cases, travel insurance DOES NOT cover childbirth overseas.

Yes. Travel insurance provides cover for complications listed in the Product Disclosure Statement.

Depending on your insurer you may be able to claim for unrecoverable accommodation and travel costs, if the cancellation is due to unexpected complications with your pregnancy.

Depending on your insurer, there may be certain cover for childbirth and care of the newborn. However, you need to be very careful as most policies DO NOT provide cover for childbirth unless it is due to complications.

Sometimes. While many insurers do not cover babies that are the result of IVF, there are some out there that do. Please refer to the table at the top of this page for a list of those from the finder.com.au panel that do.

Generally the best seat for pregnant women is on the aisle as it makes it easy to get up and down. These seats also provide a little more legroom.

Yes. If you fail to inform your insurer about your pregnancy you will most likely not be covered.

It depends on your insurer but generally if you inform your insurer of the change in circumstances you should be able to get cover.

Many insurers will not provide cover for travellers who are 26 weeks’ pregnant or further along. This doesn’t mean that you can’t purchase travel insurance cover; you can still enjoy many of the normal benefits you’d expect from your policy, but you simply won’t be covered for any claims that arise due to your pregnancy or its complications.

However, there are some travel insurance providers that are willing to insure pregnant applicants up to a maximum of 32 weeks’ gestation. Just make sure you check the full terms and condition to make sure you’re aware of what is and isn’t covered, and whether or not you’ll need to complete a medical assessment before getting approved for cover.

Generally speaking, you do not need to undergo a medical assessment before you can purchase travel insurance. Provided you’re inside the insurer’s maximum allowable weeks of gestation and you have not had any complications, you should have no trouble finding a policy.

However, some insurers will require any pregnant woman to complete a medical assessment before they can be covered, while others may require you to undergo an assessment if you’ve experienced complications as a result of your pregnancy.

This assessment typically takes the form of an online questionnaire requiring you to answer a few simple questions about your pregnancy and any complications – there’s usually no need to worry about providing a doctor’s certificate or any other medical reports.

Check with your insurer for details of whether or not you will need to complete a medical assessment before obtaining cover.

Travel insurance policies do not generally mention abortions specifically, but will generally not cover it except in some very rare circumstances. It is possible, but unlikely, that some medical tourism travel insurance policies would cover some of the costs. The only situation where travel insurance would pay for an abortion would be if you were experiencing severe pregnancy complications, and an abortion was the medically recommended course of action.

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William Eve

Will is a personal finance writer for finder.com.au specialising in content on insurance. While he cannot give personal advice to clients, Will enjoys explaining the intricacies of different types of protective cover to help individuals and businesses find affordable cover that won't leave them underinsured.

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16 Responses

  1. Default Gravatar
    SallyApril 6, 2016

    Some of the insurance companies you have listed above show they cover for IVF and Multiple pregnancies but when I go to their sites one or both of these conditions isn’t covered. Is this table up to date? Thanks

    • Staff
      RichardApril 7, 2016Staff

      Hi Sally,

      Thanks for your question. I have gone through the table to make sure the information is correct. A couple of the providers have indeed updated their information. The data contained in the table reflects the information available in the product disclosure statements (PDS) available from each insurance brand and is up to date.

      I hope this was helpful,
      Richard

    • Default Gravatar
      ErinNovember 10, 2016

      Your table is still out of date. Already been through three of the companies you listed as being ok to cover pregnancies as a result of IVF and none so far actually cover this.

    • Staff
      RichardNovember 11, 2016Staff

      Hi Erin,

      Thanks for getting in touch. I’ve reviewed the table and amended those policies which have been updated. It looks like for the majority, you’ll need to provide a pre-existing medical declaration. Also, Worldcare does offer this cover.

      All the best,
      Richard

  2. Default Gravatar
    RebeccaMarch 11, 2016

    Hi,
    I am planning to travel to Fiji for 1week, returning in my 32nd week of pregnancy. Obstetrician is happy for me to go.
    Single, unassisted and healthy pregnancy.
    I have found some providers that will cover me, but not the baby if it is born prematurely. Can you provide any advice on who would cover the costs for both me and the baby?
    Thank you,
    Rebecca

    • Staff
      RichardMarch 13, 2016Staff

      Hi Rebecca,

      Thanks for your question. finder.com.au is a comparison service and we are not permitted to provide our users with personalised financial advice or make product recommendations. Most of the travel insurance brands in the finder.com.au panel do not cover for childbirth overseas. However, Columbus Direct do offer a pregnancy extension that may be suitable for your needs.

      I hope this was helpful,
      Richard

  3. Default Gravatar
    JessicaSeptember 4, 2015

    You’ve stated on here that worldcare and simply travel insurance cover for IVF or assisted reproductive. This is actually incorrect information. There is no cover for either of these companies as stated in their PDS

    • Staff
      RichardSeptember 4, 2015Staff

      Hi Jessica,

      Thanks for your comment. Both WorldCare and Simply Travel Insurance do provide cover if your pregnancy is associated with an assisted reproduction program including but not limited to in vitro fertilisation for an additional premium. For more information, please refer to the pre-existing condition section, step 1, point c of the relevant PDS:
      WorldCare
      Simply Travel Insurance

      I hope this was helpful,
      Richard

    • Default Gravatar
      JessicaSeptember 4, 2015

      Hi Will, if you look at the PDS that you attached for me in my previous comment on page 15 of worldcare and page 13 of simply travel insurance it states very clearly that for pregnancy resulting from fertility treatment not limited to IVF COVER IS NOT AVAILABLE UNDER ANY PLAN FOR TREATMENT OR ANY RESULTING PREGNANCY.

    • Staff
      RichardSeptember 4, 2015Staff

      Hi Jessica,

      Thanks for your comment. The point you are referring to from the PDS is for people who are not yet pregnant but are undergoing fertility treatment. The table at the top of the page, and what the pervious point was in reference to, is for those travelling who are pregnant and that pregnancy was the result of an IVF or other fertility treatment.

      I hope this clears up any misunderstanding,
      Richard

  4. Default Gravatar
    LucieJune 15, 2015

    Dear Will,
    I would like to ask you, if you can recommend me some travel insurance. I will travel to Israel on 2.July till 13.July and will be in my 31./32. week of pregnancy. Im from Czech rep. and here we have travel insurance covering pregnancy issues just till 28.week. Thanks for your answer

    • Staff
      RichardJune 16, 2015Staff

      Hi Lucie,

      Thanks for your question. finder.com.au is a comparison service and we are not permitted to provide personalised advice. The travel insurers in our panel provide policies for Australian citizen and those in Australia on certain visas.

      I hope this was helpful,
      Richard

  5. Default Gravatar
    CatApril 30, 2015

    Will anyone cover a refund of paid for bookings if I get pregnant after paying and therefore have to cancel because the destination is not safe during pregnancy (such as Cusco in Peru)?

    • Staff
      WilliamMay 1, 2015Staff

      Hi Cat,

      Generally Pregnancy will be only covered up to 26 weeks inclusive, if it is a single, natural and no complications and cover will only be provided if it is an emergency. General check ups are not covered under the policy.You would not covered if it is unsafe to travel, you are only covered for cancellation if case there is a complication that has been certified by a medical practitioner.

      I hope this helps,

      Will

    • Default Gravatar
      HbAugust 3, 2017

      Hi can I check if a 26 week 5 day pregnancy would be covered under the ’26 week inclusive’ clause? Thanks very much.

    • Staff
      ArnoldAugust 4, 2017Staff

      Hi Hb,

      Thanks for your inquiry.

      This extension provides cover from the 26th week of pregnancy for unexpected pregnancy-related complications, childbirth, and care of new-born during the trip, provided:

      - Your trip does not extend beyond the 30th week of pregnancy

      - You’re not traveling against the advice of your doctor or midwife

      - There have been no complications with your pregnancy

      - It’s not a multiple pregnancy

      - The pregnancy did not result from assisted reproductive programs

      Note: if you have any non-pregnancy related medical conditions you will need to apply for this extension by phone

      Hope this information helped.

      Cheers,
      Arnold

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