Your odds of dying by age and gender

When it comes to your chance of death, insurers have thought about it.

You may wonder how life insurance companies make money, what with the payouts your beneficiaries stand to receive against the premiums you pay over the lifetime of your policy.

One factor that life insurance providers consider in underwriting your policy is your odds of dying against the population, gender and age group you belong to. Contained in something called mortality or actuarial tables, these odds help an insurance company determine the probability of you dying before your next birthday or in the next few years.

The tables below are based on the most recent mortality rates for 2016. In other words they look at the rate of death of for a particular age group in 2016 to give us a rough idea of your odds of dying. They do not consider personal health or lifestyle information, which can dramatically alter a person's life expectancy.

On a happy note, whether men or women, we're expected to live longer than any previous generation.

Death odds for men - See odds for women

Age groupOdds of dying
0–40.08%
5–90.01%
10–140.01%
15–190.04%
20–240.06%
25–290.07%
30–340.08%
35–390.11%
40–440.16%
45–490.22%
50–540.34%
55–590.51%
60–640.76%
65–691.15%
70–741.92%
75–793.33%
80–846.18%
85+14.47%

Death odds for women - See odds for men

Age groupOdds of dying
0–40.07%
5–90.01%
10–140.01%
15–190.02%
20–240.02%
25–290.03%
30–340.04%
35–390.06%
40–440.10%
45–490.14%
50–540.20%
55–590.30%
60–640.44%
65–690.69%
70–741.18%
75–792.15%
80–844.22%
85+12.60%

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare's General Record of Incidence of Mortality workbooks.

Methodology

We based our data on 2016's total number of deaths and the total estimated resident population to get a rate of death that we used as your 'odds of dying'. Your actual probability could be higher or lower depending on a range of health and lifestyle factors.

Life insurance calculator: Find out how much cover you need.

1) How much debt do you owe?
Include mortgages, credit cards, car loans, student loans and other debt.

$

2) How much do your loved ones need each month?
Start with how much you take home monthly, adding rent, food and necessities.

$

3) How many months will your loved ones need the income?
Indicate how long you think your loved ones need before they can sustain themselves in your absence

months

Your recommended coverage:

$50,000

Was this content helpful to you? No  Yes

Related Posts

Recommended guides

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy and Privacy & Cookies Policy.
Ask a question
Go to site