overdrawn credit card

Overdrawn credit card? Consider a balance transfer

How to manage an overdrawn credit card by consolidating your debt with a balance transfer.

Expenses can pile up sometimes, and reaching your credit limit can become a common occurrence if you don’t carefully watch your account balance. It’s not a good situation to be in, and can lead to debt and negative marks on your credit file. If you’ve overdrawn on your credit card and are struggling to repay your debt, a balance transfer with a 0% interest rate could help you consolidate your balance faster. Read this guide to find out what happens when you overdraw on your credit card and how a balance transfer could help you get your finances under control.

What happens when I overdraw on my credit card?

Going over your credit limit can have unpleasant consequences. This can vary between cards and providers but some of the common outcomes include:

  • Overlimit fees. Typically, your card provider will charge you an overlimit fee when you go beyond your credit card limit, which is often a flat fee for the statement period although some lenders may impose the same fee for each transaction exceeding your limit. Banks must disclose this fee in your contract and you have the right to opt out of the option to exceed your credit limit whenever you like. Opting out, however, will result in your transactions being declined.
  • Declined transactions. If you choose to not have the ability to exceed your credit limit, your card will be declined once its credit limit is exceeded. While this could be embarrassing, any direct debits or automatic payments that may come through during this time will also be declined, which may result in late payment fees by your service provider or cancellation of services (such as if your electricity payment is denied).
  • Interest charges. There is no direct interest penalty for exceeding your credit limit, but some cards deem you ineligible for interest-free days on purchases if you don’t repay your balance in full for two consecutive periods. This means your interest fees can be retroactively charged for the period and can mount up very quickly in the next period if you don’t repay your full balance for the current statement cycle.
  • Ongoing debt. Inadvertently, regularly maxing out your credit card spells ongoing debt if you’re not able to repay the full amount each month. Carrying an outstanding balance on your credit card can lead to heavy interest payments and create even greater debt.

Which lenders let you spend over your credit limit?

When could a balance transfer help?

If you have overdrawn on your credit card account because of ongoing debt issues, it may be worthwhile to consider moving your balance to a balance transfer credit card with a low or 0% introductory interest rate. This will help you save on interest charges so that you can pay off your original debt sooner. If this sounds like a good idea, consider these possible balance transfer offers:

  • Short-term balance transfers. If you have a small debt which you can confidently repay in a short time, a short-term balance transfer should suffice. Short-term balance transfer offers typically start at 0% balance transfer interest for 6 months.
  • Long-term balance transfers. If your debt is going to take longer to chip away, consider balance transfers for a longer term. A 0% balance transfer interest for 24 months is an example of a long-term balance transfer, but some can last for 12 to 18 months as well.
  • Balance transfer and purchase rate offers. If you plan to keep using the card for new purchases while paying off the balance transfer, consider getting a credit card with both a promotional balance transfer and purchase rate offer to help you effectively save on all interest. However, if you’re concentrating on paying down your debt, a card with a low purchase rate might not be a wise option.

Compare balance transfer credit cards

Rates last updated July 21st, 2018
$
% p.a.

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Name Product Balance transfer rate (p.a.) Purchase rate (p.a.) Annual fee Amount Saved Product Description
Westpac Low Rate Card
0% p.a. for 24 months with 1% balance transfer fee
13.49% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($59 p.a. thereafter)
Offers a 0% for 24 month balance transfer option, first year annual fee waiver and a competitive purchase rate.
Citi Clear Platinum - Exclusive Offer
0% p.a. for 24 months with 1.5% balance transfer fee
14.99% p.a.
$49 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($99 p.a. thereafter)
finder Exclusive: Receive 0% p.a. for 24 months on balance transfers and a discounted annual fee in the first year. Plus, access to Citi World Privileges.
NAB Low Fee Platinum Card - Exclusive Amazon Offer
0% p.a. for 24 months with 2% balance transfer fee
19.74% p.a.
$90 p.a.
finder Exclusive: 10% cashback with amazon.com.au for 12 months (capped at $25 per month). Plus, 0% p.a. on balance transfers for 24 months.
HSBC Platinum Credit Card
0% p.a. for 22 months with 2% balance transfer fee
19.99% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter)
Offers a 0% p.a. for 22 months balance transfer, $0 annual fee for the first year and an annual fee refund each year when you spend $6,000.
St.George Vertigo Platinum - Online Offer
0% p.a. for 24 months with 1% balance transfer fee
12.74% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($99 p.a. thereafter)
Platinum card benefits including complimentary insurance, plus first year annual fee waiver and 0% p.a. for 24 months on balance transfers.
Virgin Australia Velocity Flyer Card - Bonus Points Offer
0% p.a. for 18 months
20.74% p.a.
$64 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter)
Earn up to 60,000 bonus Velocity Points in the first 3 months and enjoy a discounted annual fee of $64 for the first year.
HSBC Low Rate Credit Card
0% p.a. for 20 months with 2% balance transfer fee
13.25% p.a.
$79 p.a.
Receive up to 20 months interest-free on balance transfers with a 2% BT fee. Also enjoy exclusive offers with the home&Away Privilege Program.
Citi Simplicity Card
0% p.a. for 15 months with 1.5% balance transfer fee
19.99% p.a.
$0 p.a.
Save with 5% cashback on eligible purchases (capped at $50 per month) for the first 90 days from approval. Plus, a 15 month balance transfer offer.
Virgin Australia Velocity Flyer Card - Balance Transfer Offer
0% p.a. for 18 months
20.74% p.a.
$64 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter)
Take advantage of 0% p.a. on balance transfers for up to 18 months. $64 in the first year ($129 p.a. thereafter), plus, bonus Velocity Points.
NAB Low Fee Card
0% p.a. for 18 months with 2% balance transfer fee
19.74% p.a.
$30 p.a.
Receive complimentary purchase protection insurance, a 18 month balance transfer offer and special offers from Visa Entertainment.
Virgin Money Low Rate Credit Card
0% p.a. for 14 months
11.99% p.a.
$49 p.a.
Offers a $49 annual fee, up to $100 cashback when you make a purchase within 3 months and 0% p.a. for 14 months on balance transfers.
Citi Platinum Credit Card - 100k Bonus Points
0% p.a. for 15 months with 1% balance transfer fee
20.99% p.a.
$49 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($149 p.a. thereafter)
Earn 100,000 reward Points, enjoy a long-term balance transfer offer, a discounted first year annual fee and complimentary travel insurance.
BankSA Amplify Card
3% p.a. for 36 months
19.49% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($79 p.a. thereafter)
Receive a 3% p.a. for 36 months balance transfer and earn Qantas or Amplify Points per $1 spent. Plus, enjoy a $0 annual fee for the first year.
BankSA Vertigo Visa
0% p.a. for 18 months with 1% balance transfer fee
13.74% p.a.
$55 p.a.
Enjoy a 0% p.a. for 18 months balance transfer offer. Plus, up to 55 days interest-free on purchases.
St.George Vertigo Visa
0% p.a. for 18 months with 1% balance transfer fee
13.74% p.a.
$55 p.a.
Enjoy a 0% p.a. for 18 months balance transfer offer. Plus, up to 55 days interest-free on purchases.
Bank of Melbourne Vertigo Platinum
0% p.a. for 24 months with 1% balance transfer fee
12.74% p.a.
$99 p.a.
Offers a long-term balance transfer, low ongoing purchase rate, complimentary travel insurance and access to a 24/7 personal concierge service.
St.George Amplify Card
3% p.a. for 36 months
19.49% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($79 p.a. thereafter)
Take advantage of 3% p.a. interest on balance transfers for 36 months. Plus, a $0 first year annual fee and Amplify or Qantas Points per $1 spent.
NAB Low Rate Platinum Card
0% p.a. for 6 months with 2% balance transfer fee
0% p.a. for 9 months (reverts to 13.99% p.a.)
$100 p.a.
Enjoy a 0% p.a. interest rate offer on purchases for 9 months and the protection of 7 complimentary insurances including overseas travel insurance.
American Express Velocity Escape Card
0% p.a. for 12 months with 1% balance transfer fee
20.74% p.a.
$0 p.a.
Earn uncapped Velocity Points on purchases, pay $0 annual fee for life and take advantage of a 0% p.a. for 12 months balance transfer offer.
American Express Explorer Credit Card
0% p.a. for 12 months with 1% balance transfer fee
20.74% p.a.
$395 p.a.
Receive 50,000 bonus Membership Rewards points, a yearly $400 Travel Credit and 2 entries per year to the American Express Lounge.
Citi Rewards Platinum Credit Card
0% p.a. for 26 months with 2.5% balance transfer fee
20.99% p.a.
$49 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($149 p.a. thereafter)
Earn reward Points per $1 spent, take advantage of a 0% p.a. for 26 month balance transfer offer, plus complimentary international travel insurance.
Bank of Melbourne Amplify Card
3% p.a. for 36 months
19.49% p.a.
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($79 p.a. thereafter)
Take advantage of a 3% p.a. for 36 months balance transfer offer, Amplify or Qantas points per $1 spent and enjoy a $0 annual fee for the first year.

Compare up to 4 providers

Other factors to consider before conducting a balance transfer

If you have decided that a balance transfer is the right option for you, be sure to consider the following factors before you apply.

  • Settling the overlimit amount. Some credit providers consider a card to be in default once you’ve exceeded your credit limit, and may restrict its facilities until you have paid the amount to return it to within its limit. On the other side of things, this will also likely cause your balance transfer application to be denied because the account you are trying to transfer a balance from is “not in good order”. While some card providers do not explicitly state this, it is advisable that you pay your account down to within its credit limit before applying for a balance transfer.
  • Your new credit limit. This is important because you don’t want to face the same problem of maxing out your new credit card. It would be preferable if your new credit limit is higher than the current one so that it can accommodate your full balance transfer request. Some balance transfer credit cards only allow you to balance transfer amounts up to a fixed percentage of your new card limit, such as up to 70% or 90%, so it’s important that you ensure that the new credit limit is larger than your existing debt.
  • Balance transfer fees. This cost, which is typically 1-3% of your balance transfer amount, should be factored into your calculations. The balance transfer would not be worthwhile if you had to pay a high annual fee and balance transfer fee for it, in which case you might be better off sticking to your current card and paying it off. However, there are plenty of cards that do not charge a balance transfer fee.
  • Credit rating. Most credit providers will require that your credit rating be very good or excellent before approving your balance transfer application. If your credit rating is not in a good state at this point, it may be advisable that you defer any credit card applications because they could further hurt your credit score.

Alternative ways to deal with overdrawn accounts

There are other options available apart from a balance transfer, including:

  • Making additional repayments. This can be an effective way of staying within your credit limit. By making repayments twice a month instead of monthly, or more often if necessary, you can successfully avoid maxing out your card.
  • Requesting a credit limit increase. You may be eligible for a credit limit raise if your credit score is good and you’ve had a healthy history of making regular repayments with this card provider. You can usually request an increase in your credit limit online or by contacting your provider over the phone.
  • Contacting your provider. It is often a good move to call your credit provider for a chat. If you explain your circumstances, they are usually willing to discuss your options and offer possible solutions in order to retain your business.

Overdrawing on an account is never ideal, but there are several ways to prevent this. If you’re struggling with debt, a balance transfer may help provide the breathing room you need for a period of time. However, a long-term solution may involve seeking help for debt management.

Complete guide and comparison for balance transfer credit cards

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