FuzeNet review

Living in a Meriton apartment? FuzeNet is one of several providers available for residents.

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Fuzenet

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FuzeNet's partnership with Meriton since 2008 makes it the favoured provider for Meriton building managers, but it's not the only one available.

Highlights:

  • Australia-based customer service

Compare FuzeNet plans here

What are FuzeNet NBN plans like?

With FuzeNet, you can get NBN plans across three speed tiers on a choice of month-to-month, 12-month or 24-month contracts. Here's what it has:

  • "The 25". Unlimited data for $69.95 per month. Typical evening speed of 24.2Mbps.
  • "The 50". Unlimited data for $79.95 per month. Typical evening speed of 41.7Mbps.
  • "The 100". Unlimited data for $99.95 per month. Typical evening speed of 78.7Mbps.

Plans come with a set-up fee of $99, reduced to $49 on a 12-month and $0 on a 24-month contract. You can bring your own modem or purchase one from FuzeNet for your plan, though it's priced separately and isn't included in the set-up fee.

Does FuzeNet offer any other Internet plans?

FuzeNet sells plans on non-NBN networks, too. This includes fibre networks owned by LBNCo, OptiComm and OPENetworks, so if your address is serviced by any of these you should be able to get a FuzeNet plan, too.

Finder only displays FuzeNet's NBN plans because these are the most widely accessible. If you're on one of these other networks, check your address on the FuzeNet website directly for more details.

FuzeNet review

On the surface, FuzeNet might seem like your run-of-the-mill NBN provider, but there are a lot of reasons to steer clear. While its plans offer fairly typical speeds for slightly above-average prices, it has a history of problematic business practices.

Watch out for…

  • FuzeNet forces you to waive parts of the Customer Service Guarantee, so you can't submit complaints under some circumstances.
  • FuzeNet was sued by The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) in 2018 for failing to have an adequate complaints handling process.
  • Residents of Meriton-owned apartments may be pressured into buying FuzeNet services or told there are no other options, even when they can pick other providers.

Here are the main features you'll get on a FuzeNet NBN plan:

phone

Phone bundles

map

Australian customer support

And a quick summary table:

Feature
Does FuzeNet offer it?
Unlimited data plansyes, this feature is available
Cheaper data-capped plansno, this feature is not available
Home phone line/call packsyes, this feature is available
Entertainment add-onsno, this feature is not available
Compulsory modem purchaseno, this feature is not available
NBN speeds availableNBN25, NBN50, NBN100
Contract choicesMonth to month, 12 months, 24 months

Is FuzeNet Internet any good? We ask our utilities expert and writer, Sam Baran.

Photo of Sam BaranBy all accounts, FuzeNet is not a great choice for an Internet plan, with endless accounts of poor service and unreliable connections. Business practices aside, its plans come with loads of extra charges and mediocre typical speeds.

Don't listen to your building manager if they say FuzeNet is your only choice – look into getting a better plan from the likes of Exetel or Leaptel, instead.

How does FuzeNet compare?

We've placed FuzeNet's NBN50 plan up against Telstra and Optus to see how it fares.

ProviderTypical evening speedPriceExtra features
FuzeNet41.7Mbps$79.95 per month + $99.95 modem + $99 set-up ($0 on 24-month contract)None
Telstra50.0Mbps$90 per month + $99 connection fee (if you don't sign up online)4G mobile back-up, Telstra Plus, Telstra Air Wi-Fi, home phone line with free Australian calls
Optus45.0Mbps$75 per month + $99 connection fee4G mobile back-up, Optus Sport, home phone with PAYG calls, Fetch bundles, Game Path

FuzeNet's NBN50 plan is cheaper than Telstra, but it has a much slower typical evening speed. Compared to Optus, it costs more and is still significantly slower. Either way, it's not as fast as these other providers.

FuzeNet also loses out when it comes to features, providing nothing extra, while Optus and Telstra have NBN plans stuffed with useful bonuses. It is outperformed in every aspect.

For a final summary of FuzeNet's performance, here's a list of pros and cons:

Pros

  • Australia-based customer support
  • BYO modem options available

Cons

  • History of poor business practices
  • Loads of set-up fees (modem charged separately to set-up costs)
  • Full 30-day cancellation notice likely means an extra bill
  • Bad customer service reputation (2018 ACMA lawsuit against its complaints handling)

FuzeNet customer service

FuzeNet has a reputation for slow, unresponsive customer service. ACMA sued the company in 2018 for a lack of adequate complaints handling. Also, customers are forced to waive some of their rights under the Customer Service Guarantee to sign up with FuzeNet.

If you do need help, this is how to contact FuzeNet:

Money icon

Account management

You can manage your account via the FuzeNet website, which lets you see your account details and manage billing.

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Customer service

FuzeNet has a customer service line, but its operating hours are not published. It claims to operate seven days a week. Alternatively, you can leave a message via an online chat interface.

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Technical support

You can lodge a claim through the support section of the website or take a chance with the customer support line. There is technically a FuzeNet Twitter account, but it hasn't been active since 2015.

FAQ about FuzeNet

Who owns FuzeNet?

FuzeNet is owned by the Uniti Group, a provider of various telecommunications services listed on the Australian Stock Exchange.

I live in a Meriton apartment. Is FuzeNet the only Internet service I can access?

No, FuzeNet should never be your only choice. Some building managers (especially in Meriton apartments) may claim FuzeNet is the only option, but they can't legally restrict you from going with other providers.

If the NBN is connected to your property, you can buy a plan from any one of the dozens of NBN service providers on the market.

If you live in an embedded network or a private fibre network, you should be able to buy a plan from any of the retail service providers listed with LBNCo. Know your rights to ensure you aren't bullied into an expensive plan you don't want.


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