Superhero’s top 5 Australian and US stocks revealed

Posted: 13 December 2021 12:42 pm
News
Close up of businesswoman reading financial stock market analysis on smartphone on the go, in downtown city street against illuminated urban skyscrapers in the evening. Business on the go

Trading data reveals where Aussies put their money in 2021.

Australian retail investors have flocked to familiar brands during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to their recent trading activity.

Figures released by Superhero show Zip (Z1P) edged out rival Afterpay (APT) as the most-traded stock in 2021.

For banks, Aussie investors favoured the largest one, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (ASX:CBA).

It edged out its rivals Westpac (ASX:WBC), ANZ (ASX:ANZ) and NAB (ASX:NAB), in that order.

CEO and co-founder of Superhero John Winters points out that despite 2021 being a challenging year for retail investors, interest in familiar brands grew.

"There was a clear trend across both Australian and US shares that Superhero customers invested in the brands they interacted with regularly," Winters said.

"From Qantas and Kogan in Australia to Apple and Tesla in the US, our customers invest in what they are invested in personally."

US markets

When investing overseas, Aussies are less likely to choose a familiar brand.

Instead, they heavily favoured stocks that will potentially win in a decarbonised world.

According to Superhero, 3 of the top 5 US-traded stocks in 2021 were electric car manufacturers.

"Aussie investors quite clearly see the value of electric vehicles – to have 3 EV companies be in the top 5 most-traded US companies is huge," Winters continued.

The familiar name of Tesla remained at the top.

"Tesla has led the charge for years but seeing Lucid Motors and Rivian also make the list showcases how Superhero customers back electric vehicles as the future," Winters said.

"Rivian in particular is an interesting one, being a favourite among investors despite only listing in mid-November."

ETFs

Despite a strong focus on individual Australian shares, Aussie retail investors tend to favour international ETFs.

According to Superhero, buying international ETFs allows Aussies an exposure to a global market that they may not be familiar with.

"For example, the BetaShares NASDAQ 100 ETF (ASX:NDQ) and the BetaShares Asia Technology Tigers ETF (ASX:ASIA) were the first and second most-traded Aussie ETFs in 2021 respectively," Winters said.

"Both of these ETFs give investors the opportunity to gain exposure to some of the biggest companies in the world in a single transaction," he concludes.

The top 5 most-traded Australian companies between 1 January 2021 and 30 November 2021 (inclusive) were:

  1. Zip
  2. Flight Centre
  3. Fortescue Metals
  4. Qantas
  5. Afterpay

US top 5 traded stocks

  1. Tesla
  2. Apple
  3. Lucid
  4. Rivian
  5. Alibaba

At the time of publication, Cameron Micallef owned shares in Zip.

Disclaimer: This information should not be interpreted as an endorsement of futures, stocks, ETFs, CFDs, options or any specific provider, service or offering. It should not be relied upon as investment advice or construed as providing recommendations of any kind. Futures, stocks, ETFs and options trading involves substantial risk of loss and therefore are not appropriate for all investors. Trading CFDs and forex on leverage comes with a higher risk of losing money rapidly. Past performance is not an indication of future results. Consider your own circumstances, and obtain your own advice, before making any trades.

Get more from Finder

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms of Use, Disclaimer & Privacy Policy and Privacy & Cookies Policy.
Go to site