This eco tech company makes solar batteries that can save you $950/year

Posted: 23 December 2021 2:34 pm
News
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The solar storage battery is made from household and industrial waste, and could save you $10,000+ in 20 years.

Zero Emissions Development (ZED), an Australian renewables company based in Queensland, is making headways in the local solar market by launching a sustainable solar battery storage system that is 100% recyclable.

This battery energy storage system (BESS) stores energy captured from rooftop solar that can be used when the sun goes down.

In laymen's terms, a solar storage battery is key if you want to save electricity for later, when it's needed the most. Plus, it enables you to use clean energy if you don't want to rely on the grid.

But how exactly is it different to what's already readily available? We chat to ZED CEO, Ahmed El Safty, to understand.

"An Australian development, this hybrid battery predominately uses graphene as opposed to lithium."

"Lithium is a mined resource whereas graphene is an incredibly strong compound made from waste products like used plastics and tyres, and bio waste such as sugar cane crop remainders," El Safty explains.

"PowerCap lasts 2 to 3 times longer than the standard lithium battery, is cheaper, cleaner and more reliable. It's also 100% recyclable at the end of its 30-year life."

In short, PowerCap aims to:

  • Recycle used products into energy, reducing landfill
  • Help Australia reach its zero carbon targets
  • Help you save money over time

If you're keen to get your hands on the latest tech, it'll cost you $8,600 (including GST) for the 10kWh model.

Expect to save $10,000+ with PowerCap

The average cost of electricity is currently 26c/kWh.

If you take the above price and multiply it with the total kWh of the battery (10kWh), the result is $2.60 per day in savings or $949 over 365 days.

Over 20 years, the estimated savings will amount to $18,980.

If you factor in the payback period for the battery itself (10+ years), you'll end up saving $10,380 in total.

Let's take PowerCap customer, Melinda Bates, as an example. She was keen to save on her energy bills and was able to reduce how much electricity she got from her supplier by 91% using the 8.5kWh PowerCap (currently out of stock).

Around 94% of Bates' evening energy usage came from the PowerCap, which saved her $923 yearly.

  • Keep in mind. Your savings could vary greatly depending on your usage and changes in the average cost of electricity over the years. Keep the above figures in mind as estimates only.

Why is PowerCap's timing so important?

According to El Safty, with global warming sitting at terrifying levels, it's imperative that we all do everything we can to reduce the warming of the planet.

"Renewable energy storage – providing energy reliability – has been our biggest barrier to transition for some time," El Safty says.

"As we move towards a greater reliance on renewables, the need for reliable energy storage becomes paramount."

And this is where PowerCap hopes to make a difference and take advantage of Australia being a sunny country.

"Australians should be utilising the energy of the sun to power their lives. Look for battery storage that is safe, reliable, affordable and recyclable. You won't look back."

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