What are Public Sector Super Funds?

super fund

Here’s everything you need to know about Public Sector super funds.

Public Sector super funds come with certain features that benefit employees of Federal and State government departments. These funds generally have lower fees with profits going back to their members rather than stakeholders. In addition, some employers contribute more than the 9.5% minimum towards super.

Generally, long-term members of public sector super funds have defined benefits funds while newer members tend to have an accumulation fund.

About the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS)

The Public Sector Superannuation Scheme was established under the Superannuation Act 1990 exclusively for employees of the Australian Government.

From 1 July 2005, no new members are allowed to join the PSS. However, if you’re a PSS preserved member or PSS invalidity pensioner, you may be able to rejoin the PSS as a contributing member.

The PSS is a defined benefit super fund with an accumulation component for any members with transferred amounts and/or super co-contributions.

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How does the PSS work?

Only contributing members can put money into their super or receive employer contributions. The benefit provided to contributing members of the PSS is defined by the final average salary and an accrued benefit multiple.

In the PSS, your employer makes contributions in two different ways:

  1. A fortnightly contribution - the productivity component, and
  2. An employer component that is calculated when you leave the PSS.

What are the benefits of investing with the PSS?

If you invest with the PSS, you’ll receive a number of benefits that will help boost your retirement savings. Here’s a few of the benefits you receive:

  • Competitive cost. Employers contribute toward the costs of administering the PSS, which means that no administration fees are taken from your account. The PSS pays no commissions to financial advisers.
  • Investment choice. The default fund or the Cash Investment option are available to preserved and associate members. There is no choice of investment option for contributing members as the defined part of the benefit is unaffected by investment performance.
  • Invalidity and death benefits. The PSS offers partial invalidity retirement and death benefits at no cost. Additional death and invalidity cover is available for contributing members who are unable to reach their maximum benefits limit at a relatively low cost.

The risks of the PSS

To find out about the risks associated with the PSS, check out the infographic below.

Public Sector super fund

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What are the fees and costs associated with the PSS?

Small differences in both investment performance and fees and costs can have a substantial impact on your long-term returns.

For example, total annual fees and costs of 2% of your account balance rather than 1% could reduce your return by up to 20% over a 30-year period.

If you’re a member of the PSS, you don’t pay any administration, switching, exit or any other ongoing administration fees as these costs are covered by your employer (or your former employer if you’re a preserved member).

Insurance in your super

Death, partial invalidity and invalidity retirement benefits are available through the PSS to help protect your current lifestyle and provide for you or your family in the event of sickness, injury or death.

The calculation of an invalidity retirement benefit for contributing members under age 60 depends on a number of factors including:

  • Your final average salary.
  • Your accrued benefit multiple at retirement.
  • A multiple based on what would have accrued had contributions continued to age 60 (prospective multiple), at the greater of 5% or the average percentage rate contributed over the 78 pay days (total pay days, if less) prior to the date of invalidity retirement or death.
  • The maximum benefit limited.
  • Whether you have been classified as a limited or full benefits member.

A partial invalidity pension is a form of income maintenance. It’s paid as a pension when your salary is permanently reduced due to a medical condition. A partial invalidity pension is not paid where a member:

  • Has reached maximum retiring age (usually 65).
  • Has less than three years membership and/or is a limited benefits member.
  • Ceases to be a member of the PSS.
  • Is entitled to compensation under a Commonwealth or State or Territory law providing for worker’s compensation.
  • If the medical conditions has been caused by willful action for the purpose of obtaining an invalidity benefit.

Death benefits are payable to your spouse and/or children should you die while you are a contributing member, a preserved member or after retirement provided you were receiving a PSS pension.

If you die while you are a contributing member and were not a limited benefits member, the pension payable to your dependants will be a percentage of the invalidity pensions that would have been payable had you retired on invalidity grounds.

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How do I compare Public Sector Superannuation funds?

A public sector fund is only available to public sector (government) employees, and in some cases, former government employees. You can’t choose a public sector fund although some of them let you choose to remain a contributing member when you leave the public sector.

In these circumstances, you may be able to arrange for your new employer to contribute to your public sector fund. As of December 2015, there are 19 public sector super funds.

How can I apply for the PSS?

From 1 July 2005, no new members are allowed to join the PSS. However, if you’re a PSS preserved member or PSS invalidity pensioner, you may be able to rejoin the PSS as a contributing member.

So if you’re trying to apply for a public sector super fund, most likely, you won’t be able to do it unless you’re a preserved member or PSS invalidity pensioner.

Three retail fund myths debunked

When will my pension cease/run out?

You will continue to receive pension until your death.  Following this, your pension may be paid to beneficiaries such a spouse and/or and dependant children.

What happens when I pass away?

Your family should notify PSS of your death as soon as possible. Your family should complete and submit the benefit application form which will require identifying documents such as a Will, birth, marriage and death certificate.

Can I nominate or change my beneficiaries?

No, you can’t. PSS scheme rules determine who receives your PSS benefit in the event of your death, which means the PSS cannot accept binding beneficiary nominations. Under the PSS rules, your benefit will be paid in the event of your death to any eligible spouse and/or children. An eligible spouse is defined as a person who was living in a marital or couple relationship with your at the time of your death, for a continuous period of three years or more.

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