How Do I Choose Solar Suppliers and Installers?

Information verified correct on October 22nd, 2016

Read this before you choose a solar supplier or installer or you might miss out government rebates.

Choose a Clean Energy Council (CEC) accredited solar installer so you can earn credits in the government’s small-scale renewable energy scheme and potentially save thousands on your solar installation. There are more than 4,000 accredited solar installers to choose from, it’s important to ask a few questions to find the best person for your job.

CEC approved retailers and accredited installers

The peak body for the clean and renewable energy industry in Australia, the Clean Energy Council (CEC) has a network of accredited PV solar installers and suppliers. Choose a Clean Energy Council accredited supplier and installer and be confident your solar installation meets the highest Australian standards. Accredited installers follow best practice by adhering to the CEC PV Installer Code of Conduct. All suppliers who adhere to the CEC Retail Code of Conduct are listed on the CEC website as an approved retailer.

The CEC website should be your first stop to choose a solar supplier and installer. You may not be eligible for government rebates like small-scale technology certificates if your PV solar system is installed by a workman without CEC accreditation.

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The Clean Energy Council accreditation scheme

By choosing a CEC accredited installer and a CEC approved retailer, you can confident that:

  1. The installer has completed the appropriate level of study and training necessary to install your PV solar roof system.
  2. Your solar installer is up to date with the latest training opportunities and industry best practice.
  3. You can receive rebates like small-scale technology certificates if you’re eligible to do so.
  4. Your PV Solar supplier can provide at least a five year warranty on parts.
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Things to look out for in a solar installer or supplier

There are over 4,000 accredited solar installers in Australia and more than a handful of approved solar retailers. These questions can help you find the best person for your job.

  • Are you accredited as a designer and installer? Ask potential solar installers about their qualifications and whether they’re accredited as a designer and an installer.  Both qualifications are necessary to install a PV solar power system. It’s a bonus if the accredited installer also adheres to the Solar Energy Council’s PV Installer’s Best Practice Program.
  • How long have you been in business? Accredited installers are required to retrain after two years on the job. The time a retailer or installer has been in business can be a good indication of the quality of their work.
  • Do you have any testimonials? Testimonials from past clients can be a good way to find the best retailer or supplier from the list of CEC approved and accredited companies and contractors. It can be a good idea to have a look at past jobs, if a prospective supplier or installer has done work in your area before.

Frequently asked questions

What’s the difference between a solar supplier and a solar installer?

A solar supplier is a retailer who can source certified solar parts and can generally provide an accredited solar installer to instal the system on your roof. Some solar installers are independent contractors who source parts from suppliers to complete your job. An approved solar retailer is generally the first point of call for someone looking to install a solar PV system on their roof.

Do I need to get a on-site inspection for a quote?

A Google Earth snapshot may be acceptable for an initial quotation. The installer must have visited your property for a site inspection before a contract is drawn up. This ensures the PV solar system is tailored specifically for your property.

How do I make a complaint against a solar retailer or installer?

If you have a complaint against an approved retailer or an accredited installer, you must file the complaint with the Clean Energy Council. The CEC has a dispute resolution process for dealing with customer complaints.

Remember you must use an accredited solar installer to claim small-scale technology certificates. The Clean Energy Council website has a database of approved retailers and accredited installers.

Shirley Liu

Shirley is's publisher for banking and investments. She is currently studying a Masters in Commerce (Finance) and is the author of hundreds of articles. She is passionate about helping Aussies make an informed decision, save money and find the best deal for their needs.

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