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US SEC approves Bitcoin ETFs: What does it mean for Australian investors?

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Bitcoin ETFs gain SEC approval, signalling new opportunities for investors. Here's what you should know about it.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has given the green light to 11 bitcoin exchange-traded fund (ETF) applications.
  • 11 spot bitcoin ETFs were approved and are expected to begin trading soon.
  • The introduction of spot bitcoin ETFs is anticipated to simplify cryptocurrency investment, potentially attracting a wider pool of investors and assets into the crypto market.

Hey there, Aussie investors! Have you heard the latest buzz from across the pond?

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has finally given the green light to Bitcoin ETFs. This came into play after getting the regulatory approval on January 10 (U.S. time) from the American regulators.

Bitcoin's (BTC) price is on the rise as well, up by more than 2.5% in the 24 hours since the announcement and 9% in the past week.

But what does this mean for you in Australia? Let's dive in and find out how it could impact your investment game.

Understanding Bitcoin ETFs

First things first, let's break down what an ETF is. ETF stands for exchange-traded fund.

Picture it like a basket of stocks, bonds, or in this case, Bitcoin, that you can buy or sell on a stock exchange. It's a way to invest in a bunch of different assets without buying each one individually.

Now, a Bitcoin ETF is essentially this same basket, but packed with Bitcoin or Bitcoin-related assets.

This means you can invest in Bitcoin's value without the hassle of dealing with the actual cryptocurrency – no digital wallets, no private keys, just good old stock trading.

But here's the latest scoop: the US SEC has approved not one but 11 Spot Bitcoin ETFs.

These newly approved ETFs include some big names like Blackrock's iShares Bitcoin Trust (IBIT), ARK 21 Shares Bitcoin ETF (ARKB), and Fidelity Wise Origin Bitcoin Trust (FBTC), among others.

Approved spot Bitcoin ETFs: Here's the entire list:

  • Blackrock's iShares Bitcoin Trust (IBIT)
  • ARK 21Shares Bitcoin ETF (ARKB)
  • WisdomTree Bitcoin Fund (BTCW)
  • Invesco Galaxy Bitcoin ETF (BTCO)
  • Bitwise Bitcoin ETF (BITB)
  • VanEck Bitcoin Trust (HODL)
  • Franklin Bitcoin ETF (EZBC)
  • Fidelity Wise Origin Bitcoin Trust (FBTC)
  • Valkyrie Bitcoin Fund (BRRR)
  • Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (GBTC)
  • Hashdex Bitcoin ETF (DEFI)

Each of these products offers a unique way to get a slice of the Bitcoin action, without the complexity of handling the crypto directly.

A long wait to get the green light

This long-awaited approval is a significant milestone.

Previously, the SEC had been hesitant, citing concerns over Bitcoin's unregulated nature. That's a big leap from the initial rejection of a similar proposal back in 2013.

Though Bitcoin ETFs based on futures products got the nod in 2021, it's the first time spot-based Bitcoin ETFs are seeing the light of day.

But with this move, there's a newfound legitimacy and a clearer regulatory framework, which could ease investor worries.

Impact on the global market

The US SEC's thumbs-up to Bitcoin ETFs is big news for the global market.

It signals a nod of approval towards cryptocurrencies, previously seen as the wild west of the financial world. This decision could mean more stability and legitimacy for Bitcoin and its crypto cousins.

"We believed that bitcoin could change the world, and we were and remain excited at the prospect of democratising access to this asset," Grayscale CEO Michael Sonnenshein told Reuters.

However, with great opportunity comes great responsibility. This development might bring Bitcoin into the spotlight, but it also shines a light on the need for investor education and caution in this still-evolving market.

In a January 10 press release, SEC Chair Gary Gensler stated:

"While we approved the listing and trading of certain spot bitcoin ETP shares today, we did not approve or endorse bitcoin. Investors should remain cautious about the myriad risks associated with bitcoin and products whose value is tied to crypto."

What does it mean for Australian investors?

This move by the US SEC could open new doors for investing in Bitcoin. It's not just about buying and holding the actual cryptocurrency anymore.

With Bitcoin ETFs, you can tap into the Bitcoin market through a format that's perhaps more familiar and less intimidating.

As you explore these new investment avenues, stay informed, stay cautious, and maybe, just maybe, you'll find a new golden nugget in your investment portfolio.

Remember, a smart investor is always a well-informed investor!

Keen to learn how to buy Bitcoin ETFs? Now you can buy one in just 4 simple steps.

Looking for a low-cost online broker to invest in the stock market? Compare share trading platforms to start investing in stocks and ETFs.

Disclaimer: This information should not be interpreted as an endorsement of futures, stocks, ETFs, options or any specific provider, service or offering. It should not be relied upon as investment advice or construed as providing recommendations of any kind. Futures, stocks, ETFs and options trading involve substantial risk of loss and therefore are not appropriate for all investors. Past performance is not an indication of future results. Consider your own circumstances and obtain your own advice before making any trades.

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