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Check your credit score

Determine your borrowing power and get your finances under control by checking your credit score.

Your financial history is documented in your credit report, and your credit score is calculated using that information. Lenders use this score, along with your report, to assess the risk involved in lending to you.

Keeping tabs on your credit score can help keep your financial reputation in check and improve the chance of an application being approved. Checking your report regularly also ensures you always have a comprehensive understanding of your credit history. You can use this guide to find out how you can check your credit score for free, understand what is considered a good or bad score and more.

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What is a credit score?

A credit score is a numerical representation of the information on your credit report. There are a few different credit reporting bureaus in Australia that offer credit scores and each have different credit score ranges. Credit scores from Experian are between 0 and 1,000 and credit scores from Equifax are between 0 and 1,200. The higher your score, the better a borrower you are determined to be. You can compare the breakdown of credit scores from weak to excellent below:

Credit bandExperianEquifax
Excellent800-1,000833-1,200
Very good700-799726-832
Good625-699622-725
Fair / Average550-624510-621
Weak / Below average0-5490-509

How is my credit score calculated?

From the types of credit you've applied for, the number of enquiries you've made and your repayment history, here are some of the factors that can impact your score:

  • The type of credit provider. Lenders apply different criteria to approve your credit application, so the type of credit provider listed on your file is factored in when determining your credit score. For instance, the level of risk associated with a utility company will differ from that of a bank.
  • Type and size of credit. Different types of credit will carry different types of risk, as will larger loan sizes and credit limits. However, secured loans such as mortgages, while larger, will be calculated differently.
  • The age of your credit report. If you've only had a credit report for a short while it will be treated differently to a credit report that has been active for a number of years. A new credit file with little evidence of positive behaviour may be riskier than an older credit file.
  • Credit enquiries. Every time you apply for a loan, credit card or even interest-free finance it will be listed on your credit file. If you have multiple loan applications in a short space of time it could hurt your credit score. Your pattern of credit enquiries over time is also looked at. For instance, if you have a new credit report with multiple credit enquiries it will be treated differently to a credit report with the same number of credit enquiries spread over time.
  • Personal details. Details of your employment history, age and length of employment, or even how long you have been at your current home address, could affect the level of credit risk assigned to you.
  • Negative credit listings. Equifax looks at the number of serious infringements on your credit report to better understand your financial reliability and hence your credit score. The number of defaults, clearouts or outstanding debts on your credit history directly impacts how high your credit score will be.
  • Court writs or default judgments. The number of court judgments, personal insolvencies, writs and bankruptcies or other public documents on your credit file will determine how high your score will be.

How do I check my credit score?

You have a few different options to check your credit score:

  • Finder. We offer a free credit score and credit report service powered by Experian. Head to this page to check your full credit report and score. You'll also receive updates when anything on your report changes and get an updates score every month.
  • Equifax. If you want to find out your Equifax Score you'll need to sign up for a one-year package with Equifax, which costs $79.95. You can access your file for free but your credit file can only be seen with the package. The Equifax Starter pack includes instant delivery of your credit report, your Equifax Score plus additional discounted credit reports.
  • Dun and Bradstreet. You can check a company's D&B rating as part of the D&B credit report. The rating combines a company's size and balance sheet information to help clients evaluate its financial credibility and risk.

Do I need to check my credit report as well as my credit score?

It's important to keep an eye on your credit file as well as your credit score. As mentioned above, you can check your full credit report and score with finder. You're also entitled to one free credit report check per year from a credit bureau and you can also order a copy if you've recently been denied credit. Keeping an eye on your credit file can help keep the following things in check:

  • Checking for incorrect defaults. In some cases, erroneous listings are a reason for a bad credit score. Checking your credit report can reveal incorrect accounts, debts wrongly listed as defaults or debts listed twice, which can then be removed to improve your score.
  • Looking for incorrect personal information. Incorrect information about your current address can be detrimental to your credit reputation. This would mean that bills and other notices from credit providers would not reach you, leading to more default listings on your credit file.
  • Monitoring instances of identity theft. Check your credit file regularly to ensure that there are no foreign credit applications or bills not known to you, as these might indicate that you have been a victim of identity theft.

If you do find incorrect listings on your credit report, check out our guide to removing incorrect defaults and black listings for tips on what to do next.

Have more questions about your credit score?

Does everyone have a credit score?

No. You will only have a credit score if you have a credit report, and you'll only have a credit report if you've held a credit account that has been reported to a credit bureau. This can include credit cards, loans or utility accounts.

How can erroneous credit applications be corrected?

Credit applications made by fraudsters or credit accounts that are not yours but are wrongfully listed on your credit report can only be removed by the credit provider who listed them. You should get in contact with the credit provider to remove the listing or follow up with the Credit Ombudsmen if the issue is not resolved.

How can I improve my credit score?

You can do this by spacing out or limiting your credit enquiries, paying all your debts on time and clearing your credit card debt in full every month. Utility bill payments and rent payments should also be made on time. See Finder's guide to improving your credit score for more tips.

Elizabeth Barry

Elizabeth is the Fintech Editor for finder and writes about innovations in financial products and services – think banking products that are easier to access, faster, cheaper and personalised. She started writing about personal finance five years ago and found it was her passion (which was a surprise to no one more so than herself).

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8 Responses

  1. Default Gravatar
    JackMay 26, 2017

    I don’t have a licence for verification.

    • Default Gravatar
      LiezlMay 26, 2017

      Hi there,

      Thanks for your question.

      Unfortunately, a valid Australian driver’s licence is needed to access your score. If you have a passport, you can use this link to order a free copy of your credit file.

      Kindly note that your credit file is a detailed record of your borrowing history and it’s different from your credit score which is a numerical representation of your risk as a borrower.

      I hope this has helped.

      Cheers,
      Liezl

  2. Default Gravatar
    HansMay 17, 2017

    Hi,
    Why is the credit score Finder provides me different from the credit score I obtained directly from Equifax?
    Thanks,
    Hans

    • finder Customer Care
      MayMay 17, 2017Staff

      Hi Hans,

      Thank you for your inquiry.

      Credit ratings are regularly updated, so there could be something that may have caused your score to change by the time you’ve got your score from Equifax and through our page (which is also coming from Equifax).

      Furthermore, whilst knowing your credit score could be useful, especially if you are accessing credit, please note though that it’s just merely an indicator of whether you’ll get the credit that you want. So in the actual application, other factors like your total income, present employment and current assets will also be taken into account when lenders consider your application.

      Cheers,
      May

  3. Default Gravatar
    MingJanuary 11, 2017

    Hi, you talk about credit score but from what i can gather from reading the articles is that you are referring to a Veda Score, D&B, credit sense score etc. From my understanding in essence these scores refer to credit enquiries but only forms part of a persons “credit score”. Correct me if I’m wrong but these “credit scores” do not consider ones asset position, DSR, savings, income, occupation etc These “score” weights accompanied credit check score forms the framework for a persons “credit score”. I think the term “credit score” is used incorrectly.

    • finder Customer Care
      MayJanuary 12, 2017Staff

      Hi Ming,

      Thanks for your comment and for taking the time to give us your feedback.

      Generally, creditors use your credit history to determine whether you are eligible for credit. By making an “enquiry” on your file, they will also generate your “credit score.” Basically, your credit score is needed because it is an indicator that lenders use and apply to their own lending criteria to determine whether you are eligible to borrow from them. However, aside from your score, they will also take into account other factors like present employment, total income and current assets when they consider your application. With that, there are lenders who are still open to lend borrowers with bad credit.

      Cheers,
      May

  4. Default Gravatar
    violetaDecember 21, 2015

    my veda score check

    • finder Customer Care
      SallyDecember 22, 2015Staff

      Hi Violeta,

      Thanks for getting in touch.

      You can read more information regarding Veda and order a copy of your credit score here.

      You’ll just need to select the blue ‘Order Now’ button on the right-hand side of the page.

      I hope this has helped.

      Cheers,

      Sally

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