World Malaria Day on 25 April

World Malaria Day

Join the battle against this debilitating, but preventable, disease on World Malaria Day.

Malaria is a life-threatening disease that is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected mosquitoes. Over 500 million people are infected every year, with more than one million people dying from the disease, particularly in regions such as Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

One of the initiatives of the World Health Assembly to raise awareness and vital funding for the fight against malaria is World Malaria Day and this guide looks at what World Malaria Day is, what it aims to achieve and how you can participate on the day to help eradicate this terrible disease once and for all.

What does World Malaria Day do to help?

World Malaria Day is an international day commemorated every year on 25 April. Its purpose is to give countries in affected regions of the world the opportunity to learn from each other’s experiences and to support one another’s efforts to combat malaria.

In Australia and around the world, World Malaria Day is an opportunity for:

  • New donors to join in global partnerships against malaria
  • Research institutions to reveal any scientific advances they have made
  • Companies and foundations to showcase their efforts
  • Companies and individuals to donate funds towards the cause
  • Individuals and organisations to hold fundraising events
  • Electronic, digital and print media to showcase awareness campaigns about malaria

How can you get involved?

  • Purchase mosquito nets to protect people from malaria from the International Needs Australia online gift catalogue
  • Attend a World Malaria Day symposium or seminar (see the World Malaria Day website for details)
  • Write a letter or send a petition to political leaders, calling for greater government support of malaria prevention
  • Hold a fundraising event such as a dinner party, barbecue, sporting event, photo competition or trivia night
  • Organise an online event such as a World Malaria Day Twitter chat or promote the day through your social media networks
  • Take part in a public awareness campaign such as handing out leaflets or educational material at public events
  • Make a personal donation or have your friends sponsor you in a personal challenge

What methods are used to eradicate malaria?

Management strategies involving the reduction of mosquito breeding grounds and improved design of water resources, plus the use of chemical and biological controls and personal protection strategies, are gradually reducing the incidence of malaria, but they all require funding and there is still a long way to go before complete eradication will be possible.

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Don Gribble

Don is a creative writer with extensive experience writing scripts, blogs, web content and ebooks. He enjoys writing because it allows him to know a little bit about a lot of subjects and to continue learning new things every day.

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