savings for retirement in cash

Should you save money in cash?

Is it better to save money for retirement in physical cash or in a bank account? Here are the pros and cons of each.

Saving some of your retirement money in physical cash can have a few benefits, but keeping all your savings in cash is generally a bad idea. You might like the idea that keeping your money in cash protects it from potential online theft and fraud, but holding lots of cash in your home is actually a lot much more risky than you'd think.

Advantages of keeping retirement savings in physical cash

The main argument for keeping your retirement savings in cash is that you can keep a close eye on it, but there are a few other benefits too.

  • You can see it. Being able to physically see your money in wads of notes in your house is comforting for some people who are a bit skeptical of online accounts.
  • No investment risk. If you keep your money in cash, you have zero risk of it losing value in the stock market. However, the opposite is also true and you have no opportunity for it to gain value, either. Plus, it'll lose value with inflation (we've explained this below in the disadvantages).
  • Greater sense of control. If you have your money in a bank account, there are limits around how much you can spend each day. With cash, no limits apply.
  • No bank fees. If there's one way of making sure you don't pay any bank account fees, it's keeping your money out of a bank account.

Disadvantages of keeping retirement savings in cash

While there are a few small benefits, the reality is that there are several major disadvantages to saving for your retirement in cash. Some of those disadvantages include:

  • Risk of theft. Holding large sums of cash in or around your home is incredibly risky and makes you a prime target for thieves if anyone was to find out where it is stored.
  • Risk of it being destroyed. Cash is just thin plastic and it's not indestructible. It can easily be destroyed by fire or flooding, as well as less extreme risks like a child cutting it up by mistake.
  • Lose value with inflation. With inflation at around 2-3% a year, your money is actually losing value if stored in cash. This means a $50 note will buy around 2-3% less next year than what it can buy today, as the cost of household items and groceries go up. Keeping your money in a bank account that pays interest will help your cash keep up with inflation.
  • No investment growth. Keeping your money in cash means there's no chance of it growing in value. If you instead had some of it invested in products like shares, it has a much better potential to grow in value over the long term.
  • Hard to get paid in cash. Even if, after reading this, you still want to keep your money stored in cash it's actually quite tricky to do so. Most employers will not pay staff in cash, so you'll need to set up a bank account to receive your pay anyway, then withdraw it in small chunks. Don't worry, there are heaps of fee-free bank accounts to choose from.

Is keeping your money in a bank account safe?

Some people prefer to keep their money in cash as they think it's safer than keeping it in the bank. However, the opposite is actually true. Australian banks are all highly regulated and have entire teams dedicated to protecting the money that consumers deposit. Banks have sophisticated online protection systems that monitor customers' accounts 24 hours a day for any suspicious activity, theft or online fraud.

As well as this, your money up to the value of $250,000 deposited with a licensed Australian bank is guaranteed by the government under the Government Guarantee Scheme. This means that in the unlikely event that something were to happen to the bank, your money would be safe.

Bank Account Offer

HSBC Everyday Global Account

Bank Account Offer

Special offer: $100 bonus for new HSBC customers. Earn 2% cashback on tap and pay purchases under $100. Enjoy no foreign ATM or transaction fees and the flexibility to hold up to 10 currencies. Apple Pay and Google Pay available. T&C's apply to $100 bonus and 2% cashback offers.

  • Account keeping fee: $0.00
  • Linked debit card: Visa
  • ATM withdrawal fee: $0.00
  • Overseas EFTPOS fee: $0.00
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Compare Australian bank accounts to store your money

Rates last updated September 22nd, 2019
$
Name Product Debit Card Access ATM Withdrawal Fee Fee Free Deposit p.m. Monthly Account Fee Product Description
HSBC Everyday Global Account
Visa
$0
$0
Special offer: $100 bonus for new HSBC customers.
Earn 2% cashback on tap and pay purchases under $100.
Enjoy no foreign ATM or transaction fees and the flexibility to hold up to 10 currencies. Apple Pay and Google Pay available. T&C's apply to $100 bonus and 2% cashback offers.
UBank USaver Ultra Transaction Account
Visa
$0
$0
Earn up to 2.41% p.a. interest on your linked savings account. No foreign ATM or transaction fees.
$0 monthly account fee.
You must open the UBank USaver savings account in order to get this account. Enjoy access to ATMs in Australia and overseas for free and a 0% foreign transaction fee for online purchases. Manage your spending with a built-in sweep facility that automatically moves money between your linked accounts based on the limits you set. Make contactless payments with Apple Pay and Google Pay.
NAB Classic Banking
Visa
$0
$0
Enjoy convenient, unlimited access to your money.
$0 monthly account fee.
Tap and pay with your NAB Visa Debit card or your phone using Apple Pay, Google Pay, Samsung Pay or NAB Pay for Android. Temporarily block your card at the touch of a button if you lose it.
ING Orange Everyday Account
Visa
$0
$0
No fees for any ATM in Australia or overseas.
$0 monthly account fees.
Enjoy $0 ATM withdrawal fees when you deposit $1000 and make 5+ card purchases per month. Get a competitive ongoing variable rate when linked with the ING Savings Maximiser.
Suncorp Everyday Options Account
Visa
$0
$0
Monthly account keeping fee waived for life.
$0 account keeping fee: Applies to all new accounts opened from 3 December 2018.
Save for your individual goals by linking to interest-earning sub accounts. Google and Apple Pay available.
Westpac Choice
Mastercard
$0
$2,000
Special offer: $50 cash bonus for new customers (T&Cs apply).
$5 account fee waived each month the deposit condition is met.
Monthly account fee waived if you deposit at least $2,000 a month, are under 21 or if you meet other eligibility criteria. Access more than 50,000 ATMs globally for free via the Global ATM Alliance.
Citi Global Currency Account
Mastercard
$0
$0
Hold up to 10 currencies.
$0 monthly account fee.
Enjoy one linked debit card to hold up to 10 currencies and receive foreign currencies for free. Earn up to 1.75% p.a. interest on your AUD balance.
Suncorp Everyday Basics Account
Visa
$0
$0
A simple everyday account with low fees.
$0 monthly account fee.
Enjoy no monthly account keeping fees as well as the option to pay using Google and Apple Pay. Free ATM withdrawals at 3000+ Suncorp and rediATMs.
St.George Complete Freedom Account
Visa
$0
$2,000
Special offer: $40 cash bonus for new customers who open an account online (T&Cs apply).
$5 account fee waived each month the deposit condition is met.
Monthly account fee waived if you deposit at least $2,000 a month. No account fees for students and customers under 21.
CUA Everyday Account
Visa
$0
$0
Enjoy flexible payment options and access to a wide network of ATMs.
$0 monthly account fee.
Access to Google, Samsung and Apple Pay. Enjoy fee-free cash withdrawals from 10,000+ ATMs across Australia. Deposit $1,000+ into this each month and receive bonus interest on a linked CUA eSaver Reward Account.

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