The Biggest Things about Wearing Digital Smartwatches

From t-shirts designers to smartwatch makers, Wearing Digital has a passion for high tech wearables of all kinds.

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The father and son team behind Wearing Digital were into the wearable business when it first became trendy. The first foray for Lance and Jerry Seidman was in super light t-shirts that were equipped with 1080p-capable video panels. This quickly led to the smart idea of a smartwatch. As son Lance explains, the idea came to him when he noticed that his father’s hearing loss was causing him to miss important calls and texts. With a smartwatch that vibrated at notifications, this would no longer be a problem.

Lance Seidman is the partner behind the technology, conceiving of and developing the software and hardware for their products, while Dad Jerry sees to the marketing side of their business. As the head of a successful chain of restaurants in the United States called Jerry’s Famous Deli, he has the experience to take this challenge on.

Instead of tying their smartwatch to Android or iOS platforms, Lance developed the Wearable Electronic Device for Applications (WEDA), an open platform that can connect to any mobile device so long as it has Bluetooth. This is also good for other developers, who can then easily expand on his idea by freely building apps, programs, and hardware to work on top of WEDA.

Still working out of Las Vegas, Nevada, a big part of the open platform plan is to bring that technology to schools, where students can learn to write code using the WEDA. Partnerships with a number of K-12 schools in the United States are already in the works to make this a part of their curriculum.

The smartwatch is simplistic, connecting to a smartphone or other device with Bluetooth, which then allows the user to write and use their own programming codes. The smartwatch does come with a vibrator, accelerometer, barometer and  GPS, but no push notifications from your mobile phone. This is definitely a smartwatch meant for someone who is smart enough to design and implement their own computer codes.

There have never been any pictures released, but Wearing Digital does mention that they will be using a slap band. This is a self-fitting band that is slapped against the wrist where it then conforms to the exact size. They also mention that the watch will be water resistant, but not suitable for the shower or swimming.

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Wearing Digital’s fundraising efforts

Using an Angel investor site, Wearing Digital has been actively trying to raise $37,500 to bring their smartwatch concept to life since 2013. Unfortunately they continue to fall short on their goal, and have only been able to fulfill 75 of the over 200 smartwatch orders that have been placed. In January of 2014 they posted that the WEDA Smartwatch Band will no longer be available for purchase. They have also ceased production on their video t-shirts.

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About Lance Seidman

According to Lance’s personal website, his interest in computer programming began in grade school, when kids were still learning the basics of how a computer worked using Apple II’s. He was ostracised by an instructor for not knowing how to touch type, which fueled an urge to have a computer of his own to play with. Not because he wanted to master touch typing, but because he wanted to develop cool games.

Back when the internet was gaining momentum, and sites like AOL ruled it, Lance was working with an IBM Aptiva. His first goal was to become a hacker, and he admits now to being behind one of the worst DDOS programs at that time. He and his online friends were also mentioned by Wired Magazine in an article related to online hacking. Thankfully, he now uses his programming knowledge for good, instead of online mischief.

Despite not getting the interest he had hoped for with WEBA, Lance has continued to work with computer technology and smartphones. In 2013 he won a Microsoft Award for social good, for his Health Center app. This application lets users look up medications to find them at the best cost. He won $15,000 USD from Microsoft, which he planned on using towards a wearable that would provide medication reminders, interaction risks and alerts for when a prescription needed to be refilled.

This is a free application published under one of Lance’s other business names, Compulsive Technology. Although founded in 2006, the Compulsive Technology website does not provide any information about other products or services that they have worked on.

Lance is also on Linkedin, where his profile states that he is interested in furthering his management skills in a technology related environment. This could be an important skill for Lance to master, as he obviously has the skills needed for a lucrative technological career, he just may need some more experience on the business side of the operation.

The Seidmans certainly have a good concept, but by the looks of things it seems as if they have already moved on to other wearables and app designs. The smartwatch industry is new, and constantly evolving, making it very easy to be surpassed quickly if you are not quick enough in getting your concept off of the ground and noticed.

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Compare the latest wearables

Apple Watch
Pebble Smartwatch
Dick Smith Electronics
Sony Smartwatch 3
LG G Watch R
Samsung Gear S
Pebble Time
Motorola Moto 360
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