Tiger King season 2 details and 10 similar series to binge online

Posted: 17 November 2021 6:59 pm
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When you think you've seen it all, you haven't quite seen it all.

Hit docu-series Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness was released in March 2020 and soon became a worldwide phenomenon. Everyone watched it, probably because it came out in the early days of Covid-19 lockdown and is, to put it elegantly, absolutely bonkers.

The first season of the show chronicles the feud between Joe Exotic, collector of big cats, and Carole Baskin, owner of an animal sanctuary. The official synopsis describes it as "an exploration of big cat breeding and its bizarre underworld, populated by eccentric characters". That's an understatement.

Tiger King is the kind of strange story you have to see to believe – and a lot of people did. The docu-series is one of Netflix's most successful releases to date, so of course it's now coming back with season 2. Scheduled to drop on 17 November, it promises to explore what the quirky characters we saw in the original have been up to since the series first aired.

Tiger King season 2 preview

Joe Exotic is in prison, but he will likely still be a significant presence in the new episodes. Jeff Lowe, Allen Glover, Tim Stark and James Garretson return for season 2.

Carole Baskin, who has been vocal about how unhappy she is with the series, will be featured as well, with the show teasing a closer look into the disappearance of her former husband. However, Baskin declined to be an active participant in season 2 and even sued Netflix to prevent the company from using footage of her in this new instalment.

Tiger King season 2 will consist of 5 episodes, all available to stream on Netflix from Wednesday, 17 November. Netflix subscription plans in Australia start at $10.99/month. The platform isn't offering a free trial at the moment.

10 series as bizarre as Tiger King

While the second season of Tiger King will undoubtedly attract millions of viewers, it only consists of 5 episodes. In other words, not a lengthy binge-watch. If you're looking for similar content to keep momentum going, here are 10 docu-series that rival Tiger King when it comes to wackiness. Turns out, the truth often is stranger than fiction.

1. LuLaRich (2021)

This four-part series chronicles the unraveling of LuLaRoe, a company accused of being a pyramid scheme.

The billion-dollar clothing empire repeatedly faced allegations and lawsuits about their business practices. LuLaRoe promised people they can make a lot of cash by selling clothes from home and advertised itself as an empowerment tool for women. But as the company grew, the quality of the products suffered and a lot of wannabe vendors struggled to sell anything at all.

LuLaRich is an engaging series about the company's history and business model, while also touching on broader themes like capitalism and greed. It's the kind of story that is crazier than you might expect – just like Tiger King.

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2. The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst (2015)

If you somehow missed this spectacular docu-series until now, there's no time like the present to catch up.

Directed and produced by Andrew Jarecki, The Jinx zooms in on Robert Durst, a real estate mogul who has been accused of three murders over the course of 30 years. The series exposes long-buried information and features interviews with Durst himself. A reclusive figure, he agreed to speak publicly, to astonishing results.

We won't spoil the explosive ending, but we can guarantee that your jaw will drop all the way to the floor.

3. Don't F—k with Cats: Hunting an Internet Killer (2019)

A true crime docu-series about an online manhunt, Don't F—k With Cats revolves around a group of Internet sleuths who work together to find the man responsible for a repulsive act of animal cruelty. Spoiler alert: that's not the only thing he was guilty of.

The series details how the amateur detectives carefully inspected online videos for clues of who the perpetrator might be, with their work eventually paying off. It's a great tale about how anyone might be able to find a killer in the social media age, especially when he's an attention-seeking sadist with a big ego.

  • Watch Don't F—k with Cats: Hunting an Internet Killer on Netflix

4. McMillions (2020)

McMillions (stylised as McMillion$) tackles the McDonald's Monopoly promotion scam that ran during the 90s. If you're unfamiliar with the case, the short version is that an ex-cop turned security officer rigged the McDonald's Monopoly game promotion for a decade.

With a colourful cast of characters, McMillions tells this weird but true story in compelling fashion. It features wiretaps, FBI agents, undercover operations and more bombshell details of how the culprit was finally caught. The series is as gripping as it is unusual.

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5. Wild, Wild Country (2018)

If you're in the mood for a wild, wild docu-series, you can't go wrong with this one. It centres on controversial Indian guru Osho and his community of followers. When they relocated to the United States, they soon came into conflict with the locals.

Full of twists, Wild, Wild Country focuses on the conflict, which escalates until it eventually leads to a bioterror attack. Like all series on this list, the story is bizarre, but ridiculously absorbing. It also emphasises just how far people are willing to go for their beliefs.

  • Watch Wild, Wild Country on Netflix

6. I Love You, Now Die: The Commonwealth v. Michelle Carter (2019)

If the steady popularity of legal dramas is any indication, the American justice system is nothing short of fascinating. Still, the trial featured in this docu-series is stranger than fiction given the accusations made.

Conrad Roy, who was 18, died by suicide in 2014. Then, police discovered a series of text messages from his girlfriend, Michelle Carter, in which she seemingly encouraged him to end his life. Her subsequent trial raised questions about technology and mental health.

I Love You, Now Die is a two-part series that includes footage from Carter's trial and offers background on the texting suicide case. It's heartbreaking and thought-provoking.

7. The Keepers (2017)

A seven-part docu-series, The Keepers explores the unsolved murder of nun and teacher Catherine Cesnik, which occurred in 1969. She disappeared without a trace and her body was only found months later, but no one was charged for the crime. The series focuses on a suspected link to a priest accused of abuse.

At the centre of the narrative are the nun's former students, determined to find out what really happened to their beloved teacher. The Keepers turns more disturbing with every turn, making sure viewers are glued to the screen. It's also about regular people trying to get to the truth, which makes it even more engrossing.

  • Watch The Keepers on Netflix

8. Lorena (2019)

This revelatory docu-series revolves around the explosive 1993 assault and subsequent court case involving John and Lorena Bobbitt. Lorena became a household name after cutting off her husband's penis, with the media having a field day with the case.

Lorena is executive produced by Jordan Peele, who re-investigates the story that made salacious headlines 25 years later. Featuring interviews with John and Lorena, it offers a fresh perspective on a case that was never taken too seriously. Overall, a spellbinding and satisfying watch.

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9. Evil Genius: the True Story of America's Most Diabolical Bank Heist (2018)

A baffling true story, this docu-series centres on what's often referred to as the "collar bomb" or "pizza bomber" case. In 2003, an American pizza delivery man was murdered during a complex scheme that involved a bank robbery and homemade explosive device. The moment was captured on live TV.

As expected, the incident gained extensive coverage, but Evil Genius hooks you from the very first minute – even if you're already familiar with the details. Add a healthy dose of insanity into the mix and you have the perfect Tiger King companion piece.

  • Watch Evil Genius: the True Story of America's Most Diabolical Bank Heist on Netflix

10. The Confession Killer (2019)

Back in the 80s, Henry Lee Lucas shocked the world when he confessed to hundreds of unsolved murders. But was he actually telling the truth? Turns out, not so much.

That's what The Confession Killer is all about – telling the tale and pointing out how taking the easy way out is damaging, with the grieving families only suffering more in the long run.

Over the course of 5 episodes, this horrifying tale only grows more devastating and unbelievable. Except, it actually happened in real life.

  • Watch The Confession Killer on Netflix
Name Product Simultaneous streams Max video quality Free Trial Period Monthly price Monthly Price
Disney+
Disney+
4
4K
N/A
$11.99
$11.99
Binge Basic
Binge Basic
1
SD
14 days
$10
$10
Paramount+
Paramount+
3
HD
7-days
$8.99
$8.99
Amazon Prime Video
Amazon Prime Video
3
4K
30 days
$6.99
$6.99
BritBox
BritBox
4
4K
7 days
$8.99
$8.99
Flash
Flash
1
HD
14-days
$8
$8
Foxtel Now - Essentials
Foxtel Now - Essentials
2
HD
10 days
$25
$25
Funimation Premium Plus
Funimation Premium Plus
5
HD
14 days
$7.95
$7.95
Apple TV+
Apple TV+
3
4K
7 days
$7.99
$7.99
hayu
hayu
1
HD
7 days
$6.99
$6.99
Acorn TV
Acorn TV
4
HD
7 days
$6.99
$6.99
Kayo Sports Basic
Kayo Sports Basic
2
HD
14 days
$25
$25
CuriosityStream
CuriosityStream
1
4K
N/A
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iwonder
iwonder
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HD
14 days
$6.99
$6.99
DAZN
DAZN
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$2.99
beIN Sports Monthly
beIN Sports Monthly
1
HD
14 days
$19.99
$19.99
Binge Standard
Binge Standard
2
HD
14 days
$14
$14
Binge Premium
Binge Premium
4
HD
14 days
$18
$18
Netflix Basic
Netflix Basic
1
SD
N/A
$10.99
$10.99
Netflix Standard
Netflix Standard
2
HD
N/A
$16.99
$16.99
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