The Block 2015: Blocktagon Lingo Explained

Information verified correct on October 22nd, 2016

Confused by all that tradie talk? We explain the nuts and bolts of the terms, jargon and tradie lingo featured on The Block: Blocktagon, 2015


Contrasting, clueless and unlikely- the new batch of Blockheads on The Block: Blocktagon are refreshing to say the least. With second-chance siblings (Luke and Ebony), airy-fairy Tinder couple (Andrew and Whitney), Gold Coast mums and exercise wear enthusiasts (Suzie and Vonnie), The Block fanatics and audition gymnasts (Dean and Shay), and awkward Queensland couple (Kingi and Caro), the renovation amateurs are forces to be reckoned with.

As they attempt to convert a labyrinth of odd-shaped rooms into five New York style loft apartments, the contestants commence “apartment therapy on steroids”. Lacking in construction experience and know-how, we couldn’t help but cringe when Suzie admitted to not knowing what a ‘chippie’ was-- so we created a tradie glossary to help you keep up with the jargon that will unfold throughout the series.

ALSO READ: 50% of The Block properties sold after the grand finale auctions don't make a profit

The Block: Blocktagon (2015) jargon explained:

Blockhead(s)noun; informal A term commonly used by Scott Cam to describe the new contestants on the show. Alternatively used to describe die-hard fans of the show.
synonyms; contestants, teams
“The new Blockheads have their work cut out for them.”
Block newbie(s)noun;informal Similarly, a term used to identify the new contestants on the show.
synonyms; contestants, teams
“The next challenge for the Block newbies is to renovate the main ensuite.”
Blocktagonnoun;formal The ugly, octagonal-shaped building located in South Yarra—the construction site for the eleventh series of the show.synonyms; Hotel Saville“The Blocktagon is the ugly duckling of South Yarra.”
Block shockadjective; informal The emotional state of the teams as they learn of the challenges of renovation bootcamp.synonyms; stressed, frustrated, overwhelmed“The new contestants were in Block shock as they learnt of the first 24-hour challenge.”
Reno rookiesadjective; informal The lack of experience and knowledge of the contestants.synonyms; amateurs, clueless, inexperienced“The reno rookies had no idea of what was in store for the 24-hour challenge.”
Budget blundersadjective; informal A term commonly used to describe the budget mishaps of the contestants.synonyms; budget disaster, budget mishap“The budget blunders were already underway.”
The Blockinatornoun; informal Leading foreman on the show.synonyms; Keith Schleiger“The Blockinator has his first victim.”
On my high horsecolloquial term; informal To behave in an arrogant or pompous way.synonyms; N/ACaro saw red when Kingi spent all of their budget on the timber feature wall, and she claimed that she was “galloping away on her high horse.”
High as a kitecolloquial term; informal To feel ecstatic about renovation preparation and planning.synonyms; N/AMoments before the Blockinator slammed Andrew and Whitney for their poor decision making, oblivious Andrew claimed to be “high as a kite.”
Block work

colloquial term; informal

For things to run smoothly

synonyms; effortlessly

The contestants will only pull off their guest bedroom and bathroom if it goes like Block work.

Tradie jargon explained:

TradieA qualified tradesmen such as a plumber or an electrician.“He wasn’t a bad tradie.”
BrickieBricklayer.“Never trust a brickie.”
TruckieTruck driver.“My old man’s a truckie.”
SparkieElectrician.“We need to a call a sparkie.”
ChippieCarpenter.“Have you got a team of chippie’s?”
The MissusAlso known as the ‘cheese and kisses’- a girlfriend, partner or wife of a tradesmen or bogan Australian.“I’ll just need to check with the Missus.”
Eiffel TowerThe shower.“I’m just hopping into the Eiffel Tower.”
SmokoA break generally taken during work hours to smoke or eat.“I had a dog’s eye (meat pie) at smoko.”
ServoPetrol station.“Let’s fill up at the servo.”
Woop WoopA small, remote town in the middle of nowhere.“The new site is in bloody Woop Woop.”
YewyA U-turn or 180 degree turn generally made on the road while controlling a vehicle.“She’ll be right, just take a way.”
Bottle-OBottle shop, liquor store.“Can you stop by the Bottle-O for some froths?”
DurryCigarette.“I’m trying to lay off the durries.”
On the pissTo consume alcoholic beverages.“Let’s get on the piss.”
StubbyA 375ml beer bottle.“Can you get me a stubby holder?”

Image: Channel 9

Belinda Punshon

Belinda is a journalist here at Specialising in the home loans and property sections, she is passionate about helping Australians improve their financial wellbeing.

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