Health round-up: Sunburnt eyes, sleep and new website for those caring for a loved one who is dying

Richard Laycock 28 December 2017 NEWS

Summer in Sydney

A weekly round-up of Australia's latest healthcare news.

Don't forget to throw on some sunnies

While slip, slop, slap has been the mantra for many Aussies during the summer months, Optometry Australia is urging Aussies to adhere that jingle's newer version slip, slop, slap, seek and slide... specifically the slide.

As summer heats up, Optometry Australia wants to remind everyone that it's just as important to protect your eyes from the sun's harmful UV rays by chucking on some sunnies. Resident optometrist from Optometry Australia, Luke Arundel, said that during these months our eyes are at risk of photokeratitis.

“Photokeratitis can occur in one or both eyes simultaneously. Similar to sunburn like that which occurs on your skin, it is not usually noticed until well after the damage has occurred,” Arundel said in a statement.

Optometry Australia said those looking to buy sunnies should make sure they provide good UV protection, with a category rating of between two to four. Avoid novelty sunnies as they generally offer very little UV protection, if any.

Stress levels for Aussies on the rise

The number of Aussies affected by stress has risen by 35% over the past decade to almost five million, according to Medibank.

According to The Daily Telegraph, the study also found that those who said they were stressed were two-and-a-half times more likely to suffer from anxiety and three times more likely to suffer from panic attacks than the general population.

We're also apparently suffering from a lack of sleep, with it affecting almost half (49%) of all 25-34 year old Sydneysiders.

This backs up Sleep Health Foundation Report by Deloitte Access Economics released in August, which found that roughly 40% of all Australians suffer from a lack of sleep.

LifeCircle and Bupa team up to launch Time to Share

Bupa and Lifecycle have launched a new website to help those caring for a loved one who is dying.

The website, Time to Share, is designed to help people through the process of caring and saying goodbye to a loved one who is dying. The site is designed to provide those dealing with the loss of a loved one with an outlet, a place where they can feel free to share their experiences in an open and honest environment.

"The work we are doing with Bupa can be thought about as a social movement to change the experience of death and dying," CEO LifeCircle Melissa Reader said in a statement.

Managing Director of Bupa Health Insurance Dwayne Crombie said that he hopes that people sharing their stories on Time to Share will help to lift the taboo on end of life discussions.

"Through their stories, we learn what support carers really need and how the experience could be made better," he said.


What else is happening?

Last week a Senate report into the value of health insurance found that more needs to be done in regards to transparency.

The report highlighted that over the last decade there has been a sharp decline in the value for money.

Each week our round-up offers a summary of the latest developments impacting Australian healthcare and most importantly, you, the consumer. Check in every Thursday to find out what's happening in health.

Compare your health insurance options today

Latest health headlines

Picture: Shutterstock

You might like these...

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.
Ask a question
Go to site