Stamp duty calculator

Stamp Duty Calculator

Rates and Fees verified correct on July 22nd, 2016

When purchasing a house you will most likely have to pay a tax called stamp duty. Find out more about this tax and if exemptions apply to you

When you are looking to buy a home, you will be required to pay a variety of fees and charges up front. One of these major costs is stamp duty, which is payable on nearly all home purchases. It is a tax that is charged by the government on the sale of property and shares and covers the costs of changing the title of the property and ownership details. By knowing how much you will have to pay in stamp duty, you can better plan for the expenditure of finalising the purchase of your home.

What is stamp duty?

Stamp duty is a tax set by each state or territory government that is imposed the purchase of assets such as real estate, cars and assets that belong to a business. With regards to purchasing a home you are legally required to pay stamp duty within 30 days of settlement on the property. The amount paid is set in relation to value of the property.

The amount of stamp duty that you will be charged will be determined by the state or territory that you live in, the amount you pay for the home and the type of property that you are buying. Depending on your personal circumstances you may qualify for an exemption on stamp duty.


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Rates last updated July 22nd, 2016
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How much stamp duty will I have to pay?

The amount of government stamp duty that you will have to pay depends on a number of factors. These are :

  • What state or territory you live in. Some states will charge more stamp duty than others, but most will be around the same amount.
  • The cost of the property. One of the major factors that will affect the amount of stamp duty that you pay will be the cost of the home that you bought. Generally, if you buy a home that is worth more than $500,000 you will have to pay a significant amount of stamp duty.
  • The type of home you buy. The amount of stamp duty that you will be charged will be different depending on the type of home you buy. A vacant property will have less stamp duty charged to it when compared to buying a home.

Use the finder.com.au calculator above to help you work out how much exactly you need to pay.

How is stamp duty calculated?

Each state and territory set the rates at which they will charge stamp duty as well as how they calculated for each property purchased in their local governance.

For NSW, QLD, Tasmanian, Victorian, Northern Territory and Western Australian residents or those purchasing in those states stamp duty is calculated based upon the greater amount out of the price paid for the property and the market or unencumbered value of the property. If your property is judged to be worth $450,000 but you paid $475,000 stamp duty will be calculated based on the $475,000 purchase price.

In ACT it is also based upon the greater amount between the purchase price or the market value of the property. This is the total amount of the house and land when the land already has a property on it or the purchase has been made of a house and land package where the property will be built on the land purchase before settlement. If you purchase land and then opt to build on this land at a seperate time and therefore have a seperate contract for this build you will only be charged stamp duty on the land value or purchase price.

For South Australian residents or those purchasing there stamp duty on property is calculated based on the value of the land including improvements or the price paid for the property including GST whichever is greater unless there are applicable exemptions, concessions, rebates or reductions apply.

Remember: Make sure you select the state you are buying when making your calculations. To get more information of how it is calculated in your state please click on your state in the list below.

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How can I minimise the amount I pay?

As you've already seen, paying stamp duty can significantly increase the cost of your home. However, there are steps you can take to avoid paying stamp duty or at least significantly decrease the amount you pay, which can save you a lot of money.

Consider that the rate of stamp duty you will pay increases according to the value of the property you are purchasing.

Thus, you should consider negotiating to decrease the value of the property to below a certain threshold to avoid paying a larger tax if the difference isn't too great.

If you are building a house, think of reducing the costs by purchasing cheaper fixtures, for example. Lowering the cost of building your home by a few thousand dollars can save you thousands more in taxes.

Stamp duty is significantly greater in most states on properties worth more than $500,000, so consider purchasing a home below this value to save money. Similarly, vacant properties over $300,000 will incur a much higher stamp duty so try to look for properties below this threshold.

Don't forget that in some states you will be charged on the market value of the property rather than the purchase price, so take this into consideration when negotiating. You might not necessarily be able to reduce the stamp duty you are being charged but you may be able to come to an agreement with the seller so that you can negotiate the price of the property down by at least the amount of stamp duty you need to pay.

If it's an option, you can also consider relocating to another state where stamp duty is significantly lower or, if you are a first time home buyer, where you are completely exempt from paying stamp duty. Also, make sure to fully inform yourself regarding any other concessions you might be eligible for.

Since stamp duty can be a significant cost, minimising how much you pay can help you in the long run. The money you save can be put towards paying off the loan, which will save you money on interest costs as well or it can be used to make renovations. You need to remember that it does pay to do your due diligence and see what other options are available to you to reduce the amount of stamp duty you have to pay.

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Are there any exemptions from stamp duty?

Government stamp duty can be a very large cost, however there are some exemptions that you will be able to apply for, depending on what state you live in. These include :

  • The value of your house. If you pay less than the threshold amount for your state you may find that the amount of stamp duty that you pay will be quite low. This is because people who are buying homes that are not worth as much will get exemptions from the full amount.
  • First home owners. If you are a first home owner then you may find that you can get exemptions from stamp duty. In some states, first home buyers will not have to pay stamp duty at all, while in others stamp duty will always be payable. However, if you use the first home owner’s grant to pay the stamp duty then you will technically not pay any stamp duty.
  • Pensioners and health card holders. If you currently receive Government benefits, you may be eligible for a concession or exemption. Check your local Office of State Revenue to find out if any apply to you.
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How to find out if you’re exempt from paying stamp duty

There are a number of fees associated with the purchase of a home or property in Australia, including stamp duty. This is a separate tax charged by the local Office of State Revenue where the property is located and is meant to cover the administration cost of transferring ownership and changing the title for the property.

Stamp duty tax is not a pre-set amount, but rather determined by the state or province you are purchasing in, the cost of the property and its type. There are certain circumstances that may allow an individual to be exempt or to receive discounts from this tax. As stamp tax can be a major cost, it’s important to do your research to see if you can receive any exemptions or concessions.

Australian Capital Territory

Home Buyer Concession Scheme

The ACT offers the Home Buyer Concession Scheme for home buyers buying new or substantially renovated property from 1 January 2016 to 30 June 2016.

There are a number of conditions, including that the applicant/s can not have held an interest in any land in the last two years.

They'll also need to live in the property for at least one year after buying it.

They also need to have an income which is lower than the threshold. For those with no dependent children, this threshold is $160,000 for the year prior to the property transfer, grant or agreement of property transfer - whichever is first. For those with one child, it's $163,330.

The concessions are as follows for a new or substantially renovated property:

Dutiable value of propertyDuty payable
Up to $442,500$20 minimum
$442,500 to $562,000$14.80 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $442,500
$562,000 and aboveNo concession

Source: revenue.act.gov.au. 

For vacant land it's as follows:

Dutiable value of landDuty payable
Up to $264,700$20 minimum
$264,700 to $304,900$16.90 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $264,700
$304,900 and aboveNo concession

Source: revenue.act.gov.au. 

Deferred Duty

Eligible first home owner grant or Home Buyer Concession recipients can pay off their stamp duty costs over time.

They can select from two payment plans:

  1. Pay their duty within 10 years through instalments
  2. Start paying off the duty after no more than 5 years from the date of transaction. The duty must be paid off within the next 5 years.

Interest is charged on the deferred duty amounts.

As always, check with the ACT Revenue Office to find out the full list of conditions.

Stamp Disability Trust duty exemption

No stamp duty is payable on the transfer of a property to a Special Disability Trust.

This exemption is only available if the property is used as the principal place of residence for the beneficiary of the trust.

Pensioner Duty concession

The ACT also offers concessions for eligible pensioners. This applies to homes and vacant lands.

There are also a number of conditions attached to this, so make sure you check the ACT Revenue Office.

The concessions are as follows for residential homes:

Dutiable value of propertyDuty payable
Up to $627,500$20 minimum
$627,500 to $807,000$17.15 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $627,500
$807,000 and aboveNo concession

Source: revenue.act.gov.au. 

And for vacant land:

Dutiable value of propertyDuty payable
Up to $333,500$20 minimum
$333,500 to $391,700$17.15 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $391,700
$391,700 and aboveNo concession

Source: revenue.act.gov.au. 

Regular rates of duty

Below is the regular rate of stamp duty in ACT for transactions from 3 June 2015 to current, for any other transactions please see the ACT Revenue Office website.

Value of propertyDuty payable
Up to $200,000$20 or $1.80 per $100 or part thereof, whichever is greater
$200,001 to $300,000$3,600 plus $3 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $200,000
$300,001 to $500,000$6,600 plus $4 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $300,000
$500,001 to $750,000$14,600 plus $5 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $500,000
$750,001 to $1,000,000$27,100 plus $6.50 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $750,000
$1,000,001 to $1,454,999$43,350 plus $7 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $1,000,000
$1,455,000 and overA flat rate of $5.17 per $100 applied to the total transaction value

Source: revenue.act.gov.au. Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

New South Wales

There are a number of circumstances where a buyer in NSW could be excused from paying extra funds for the acquisition of a new home. First time home owners are exempt from stamp duty tax for new homes if the value of the home is under $550,000. There are also concessions available for new homes with a value of $550,000 - $650,000.

For first home buyers buying vacant land, exemptions are available for land valued up to $350,000. Concessions are available for land valued between $350,000 and $450,000.

Rate of stamp duty in NSW, for further information, visit the NSW Office of Revenue website.
Value of propertyDuty payable
Up to $14,000$1.25 for every $100, or part, of the dutiable value
$14,001 to $30,000$175 plus $1.50 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $14,000
$30,001 to $80,000$415 plus $1.75 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $30,000
$80,001 to $300,000$1,290 plus $3.50 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $80,000
$300,001 to $1million$8,990 plus $4.50 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $300,000
$1 million or above$40,490 plus $5.50 per $100 or part thereof by which the value exceeds $1 million

Source: osr.nsw.gov.au. Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

Northern Territory

Principal Place of Residence Rebate

If you are buying a new home in the Northern Territory (NT) you may be eligible for the Principal Place of Residence Rebate (PPRR).

This is a discount off your stamp duty up to $7000.

This is for the sole use by individuals who purchased a home that has never been lived in prior or sold as a place of residence.

You will have up to five years after the transaction to apply for your rebate. To be eligible, the home or land value must not exceed $750,000 or $385,000 respectively.

Rate of stamp duty for Northern Territory, for further information visit the Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance website.
Where duty is calculated on the purchase price or unencumbered value of the dutiable property, whichever is greater, as follows

D = (0.0657144 x V2) + 15V

Where

D = the duty payable in $

and

V = the dutiable value

         1,000

  • Prior to 1 July 2011, where the dutiable value exceeds $525,000 deduct 4.95% of that amount
  • From 1 July 2011, where the dutiable value exceeds $525,000, but is less than $3 million deduct 4.95% of that
  • From 1 July 2011, where the dutiable value is $3 million or more deduct 5.45% of that amount

Source: treasury.nt.gov.au. Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

Senior, Pensioner and Carer Concession

The Northern Territory Department of Treasury and Finance offers up to $10,000 in stamp duty concessions if you're eligible.

This concession only applies to homes up to $750,000 and land up to $385,000.

You'll also not be eligible for this if you're eligible for the PPRR listed above.

Queensland

Home concession

If you buy a home and move into it within a year of the transfer, you can get a stamp duty concession.

The concession works as follows:

Purchase priceDuty payable
Up to $350,000$1 for every $100 or part of $100
$350,000 to $540,000$3,500 + $3.50 for every $100 or part of $100 over $350,000
$540,000 to $1 million$10,150 + $4.50 for every $100 or part of $100 over $540,000
Over $1 million$30,850 + $5.75 for every $100, or part of $100 over $ 1 million

Source: qld.gov.au

First home concession

If you're buying your first home, you might be eligible for a stamp duty discount.

The property will need to be worth less than $550,000.

See below for the discounts you might be eligible for:

Purchase priceStamp duty discount
Up to $504,999.99$8,750
$505,000 to $509,999.99$7,875
$510,000 to $514,999.99$7,000
$515,000 to $519,999.99$6,125
$520,000 to $524,999.99$5,250
$525,000 to $529,999.99$4,375
$530,000 to $534,999.99$3,500
$535,000 to $539,999.99$2,625
$540,000 to $544,999.99$1,750
$545,000 to $549,999.99$875
$550,000 or moreNil

Source: qld.gov.au

First home vacant land concession

If you're buying vacant land under $400,000 to build your first home, a concession be available.

Purchase priceStamp duty discount
Not more than $250,000100% of duty
More than $250,000 to $259,999.99$7,175
$260,000 to $269,999.99$6,700
$270,000 to $279,999.99$6,225
$280,000 to $289,999.99$5,750
$290,000 to $299,999.99$5,275
$300,000 to $309,999.99$4,800
$310,000 to $319,999.99$4,325
$320,000 to $329,999.99$3,850
$330,000 to $339,999.99$3,375
$340,000 to $349,999.99$2,900
$350,000 to $359,999.99$2,425
$360,000 to $369,999.99$1,950
$370,000 to $379,999.99$1,475
$380,000 to $389,999.99$1,000
$390,000 to $399,999.99$525
$400,000 or moreNone

Source: qld.gov.au

Regular duty rates

Rates of duty paid in QLD where stamp duty is known as transfer duty, for more information visit the QLD Treasury website.

Dutiable valueDuty payable
Up to $5,000Nil
$5,001 to $75,000$1.50 for each $100, or part of $100, over $5,000
$75,001 tp $540,000$1,050 plus $3.50 for each $100, or part of $100, over $75,000
$540,001 to $1 million$17,325 plus $4.50 for each $100, or part of $100, over $540,000
More than $1 million$38,025 plus $5.75 for each $100, or part of $100, over $1 million

Source: qld.gov.au. The above rates are effective from 21 September 2012 and are a guide only as stamp duty is subject to change.

South Australia

There are few exemptions or concessions available in South Australia (SA) that can assist with offsetting the stamp tax duty when purchasing a home. In fact, the taxes imposed in SA are the highest of any Australian state.

Off-the-Plan concession

There are stamp duty discounts for those buying a new or substantially renovated apartment.

These discounts only apply to apartments located in specific areas in the City of Adelaide, so be sure to check the revenueSA website for more information.

Regular stamp duty rates

Rates of duty in SA, for more information visit the Revenue SA website.
Value of propertyDuty payable
Up to $12,000$1 for every $100 or part of $100
$12,001 to $30,000$120 plus $2 for every $100 or part of $100 over $12,000
$30,001 to $50,000$480 plus $3 for every $100 or part of $100 over $30,000
$50,001 to $100,000$1,080 plus $3.50 for every $100 or part of $100 over $50,000
$100,001 to $200,000$2,830 plus $4 for every $100 or part of $100 over $100,000
$200,001 to $250,000$6,830 plus $4.25 for every $100 or part of $100 of over $200,000
$250,001 to $300,000$8,955 plus $4.75 for every $100 or part of $100 over $250,000
$300,001 to $500,000$11,330 plus $5 for every $100 or part of $100 over $300,000
$500,001 and above$21,330 plus $5.50 for every $100 or part of $100 over $500,000

Source: revenuesa.sa.gov.au. Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

Tasmania

Homebuyers in Tasmania (TAS) do not get any type of relief on the stamp duty tax unless the property is being transferred between married people, people in a significant relationship or those involved in a caring relationship. The tax duty rates for this Australian state are the third highest in all of Australia. They do however offer a grant to first time home buyers who are buying a newly constructed home. Until the 31st of December 2014, a qualified buyer could receive a grant through this program of up to $30,000.

Rates of duty in Tasmania on transfers of dutiable property made on or after 21 October 2013, for more information or for the duties on properties previous to this visit the Tasmanian Department of Treasury and Finance.
Value of property (including chattels)Duty payable
Up to $3,000$50
$3,001 to $25,000$50 plus $1.75 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $3,000
$25,001 to $75,000$435 plus $2.25 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $25,000
$75,001 to $200,000$1,560 plus $3.50 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $75,000
$200,001 to $375,00$5,935 plus $4 for every $100, or part, by which the dutiable value exceeds $200,000
$375,001 to $725,000$12,935 plus $4.25 for every $100, or part, by which the suitable value exceeds $375,000
$725,001 and above$27,810 plus $4.50 for every $100, or part, by which the suitable value exceeds $725,000

Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

Victoria

First home buyer duty reduction

First time home buyers in Victoria (VIC) are entitled to a reduction in stamp duty when the value of the home is more than $130,000 but less than $600,000 and is going to be used as a principal place of residence.

Duty is reduced by 50% for eligible buyers.

To be eligible you must meet the eligibility criteria for the first home owner grant in Victoria.

First home buyers with families

Full stamp duty exemptions are available for those buying a home worth up to $150,000. Concessions are available for properties worth up to $200,000.

To be eligible you must have a dependent child at the time of the sale.

Off-the-plan concessions

Victorian first home buyers buying off-the-plan properties, including house and land packages and refurbished lots can also be eligible for stamp duty concessions.

Pensioner duty exemption or concession

Pensioners buying a home worth up to $750,000 can get a one-off exemption or concession from their stamp duty.

To be eligible, you need to have an eligible concession card at settlement, and intend to live in the property as your home. There are other conditions which you should check on the State Revenue Office of Victoria website.

Exemptions are available for properties worth up to $330,000. If two eligible pensioners are buying a home, they can each claim an exemption for their share of the property, meaning a property worth $660,000 with two equal shares could be exempt.

Young farmers exemption/concession

If you're younger then 35 you might be eligible for exemptions or concessions.

If the property is worth less than $600,000, you'll be exempt from paying duty on the first $300,000.

If it's worth between $600,000 and $750,000, only concessions are available.

Regular stamp duty rates in Victoria

Rates of duty paid in Victoria for transactions on or after 6 May 2008, for more information visit the State Revenue Office of Victoria's website.
Dutiable value rangeDuty payable
Up to $25,0001.4% of the dutiable value of the property
$25,001 to $130,000$350 plus 2.4% of the dutiable value in excess of $25,000
$130,001 to $960,000$2,870 plus 6% of the dutiable value in excess of $130,000
$960,001 and above5.5% of the dutiable value

Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

Western Australia

First home owner concession

First time home buyers in Western Australia buying a new home are exempt from having to pay a duty on any home purchase up to $430,000. On homes or property valued from $430,001 to $530,000, a concession is available on stamp duty.

This concession is $19.19 per $100 or part thereof above $430,000.

First home buyers buying vacant land can also enjoy exemptions on property worth up to $300,000.

For land worth between $300,001 and $400,000, a concession on stamp duty is available.

This is $13.01 per $100 or part thereof above $300,000.

The home must be purchased as a primary place of residence in order to qualify. Other types of exemptions apply to family farms and transactions between family members.

General rates of duty paid in WA, for more information visit the WA Department of Finance website.
Dutiable value rangeDuty payable
Up to $80,000$1.90 per $100 or part thereof
$80,001 to $100,000$1,520 plus $2.85 per $100 or part thereof above $80,000
$100,001 to $250,000$2,090 plus $3.80 per $100 or part thereof above $100,000
$250,001 to $500,000$7,790 plus $4.75 per $100 or part thereof above $250,000
$500,001 and above$19,665 plus $5.15 per $100 or part thereof above $500,000

Stamp duty is subject to changes so please use the above as a guide only.

It’s important that you consider the stamp duty tax when looking into making a home purchase, as it could end up saving a few thousand dollars off your upfront costs.

Find out the rates and any applicable exemptions and concessions for the location where you are planning to buy a home and make sure you can afford this extra charge before making a commitment to a mortgage.

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How do I pay my stamp duty?

Paying stamp duty is not all that difficult, as long as you have the funds available. You will generally receive a notice through the mail to the address of the property you have purchased or a specified address if you chose a different mailing address. The letter will contain all the information regarding this tax, including the amount you need to pay.

In terms of when it needs to be paid, each state differs, but on average you will have about three months to make the payment in full. Note that you can't avoid paying it and if you are late, you will incur interest charges and other costs since you won't be able to complete the transaction.

Physically paying the tax is usually a matter of depositing the money in the account provided in the letter. You can do this via direct deposit, bank transfer, cheque or credit card. You don't need to worry, though, because all the payment options will be mentioned in the letter.

Can I capitalise stamp duty into my loan?

While lenders generally prefer that you pay stamp duty up front, most banks will allow stamp duty to be capitalised into the principal of the loan. You can increase your home loan to cover the cost of stamp duty and then the lender will release the funds when you need them.

However, if you are an investor, stamp duty is generally included in the cost of the property when calculating capital gains.

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How do I budget for the stamp duty costs on my new home?

How do I budget for stamp duty costs

Budgeting for stamp duty costs when purchasing a new home requires a bit of research. First and foremost, you have to consider approximately how much you will be paying for the property and what state you are making the purchase in. This is because in some states, the market value of the property will supersede the purchase price if it is higher. Also consider whether you will be paying stamp duty on your loan or not, since this will mean that you have to pay it upfront.

The easiest way to get an idea of how much your stamp duty will cost you is to use a stamp duty calculator. While the figure won't be exact, it will still provide enough of a guideline for you to create a budget. On the other hand, if you want an exact figure, you can ask a professional to calculate the cost of this tax for you as he or she can take into consideration your personal circumstances.

Don't forget that in some states and some situations you might be exempt from paying stamp duty so make sure to do your research thoroughly.

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Stamp duty in unique cases

Do I have to pay stamp duty on vacant land?

All transfers of land come with stamp duty costs, which you see by using the calculator above. The exception to this is through the various concessions and exemptions available from each state, particularly for first home buyers.

Do I have to pay stamp duty on off the plan property?

Yes, stamp duty is still payable on off the plan property, but keep in mind there are concessions and exemptions available in different states. This includes Victoria, which offers a concession, regardless of whether you intend to live in the property or not.

With the concession, you only pay stamp duty on the improved value of the land, non-deductible costs and the completed construction or refurbishment including GST.

Other states also offer first home buyer concessions and exemptions for new homes which can also apply to off the plan homes.

Do I have to pay stamp duty on a loan I am refinancing?

In most cases you will have to pay stamp duty again even if you are refinancing. However, there are situations in which you can avoid paying stamp duty. For example, if the names of the borrowers are the same and the amount of the loan is the same, there might be a chance you could avoid paying stamp duty. In some cases, you might also have to refinance with the same lender to avoid this cost.

Note that in some situations you may have to pay the fees but you can then apply for a refund from the lender. Thus, it pays to make sure you do your research before deciding to refinance because any savings you incur from a lower rate might be completely obliterated if you have to pay stamp duty again. In this case, refinancing may simply not be worth the hassle.

Divorce and stamp duty

Stamp duty isn’t payable if one of you is transferring the title to a home or land to another. However, you can only save on stamp duty if the transfer is done so you can obey a court order. The court must be able to know what assets are owned by each of the parties. This includes all of your assets like land, bank accounts and superannuation. It may be necessary to hire an expert to value an asset.

It’s important to know that parenting is seen as a very important contribution. If the marriage has been a long one, it is often seen as equal to financial contributions. Usually, the court gives the party whose financial future is not as good as the other some extra part of the property owned by the parties.

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Top tips for home loan stamp duty

Top tips for stamp duty

Here are a few tips to take into consideration to ensure the settlement process goes smoothly for both parties and unnecessary delays are avoided, which also means saving money in the long run.

Buyer tips

  • When composing the Offer and Acceptance, you need to be very specific with the Special Conditions. This means stating exactly what the condition is, who is responsible for its payment, by when the condition must be met at the latest and what the consequences will be if it is breached.
  • Note that banks generally require around 21 days to process approve your loan from when you submit your application so take that into account and make sure you allow plenty of time.
  • Banks also need 28 days from when you receive unconditional approval to release the money for the final settlement.
  • In terms of stamp duty, you will need to give seller a stamped Transfer of Land to be signed to be in full compliance with the Joint Form of General Conditions for the Sale of Land. If you don't have the funds available, advise the bank that you need the money to pay stamp duty before settlement because you will find that most lenders will be willing to help you with this to make sure you meet your obligations.
  • To expedite matters and avoid settlement delays, it is essential that you attend the signing and make sure all documents are returned as quickly as possible.
  • Make sure that you let your Settlement Agent know if you are not going to be present at any point during the settlement.

Seller tips

  • Read the Offer and Acceptance thoroughly and make sure you have understood every condition stated on it because if anything hasn't been fulfilled, there is a good chance settlement will be delayed.
  • It takes the bank 21 days to prepare the documentation to discharge your mortgage after the relevant form has been filed so make sure to let them know you will be discharging your mortgage in advance.
  • If you receive a rates notice for the adjustment of rates, which can occur during settlement, make sure your Settlement Agent receives the document as soon as possible.
  • If the title deed is in your possession because the property isn't being used as security, you will need to make sure you have it available. If you can't find it, speak to your Settlement Agent to resolve the issue as quickly as possible to avoid any delays.
  • Make sure you are present at the signing and that all documents are returned as quickly as possible to avoid unnecessary delays and inform your Settlement Agent if there is a chance you might be away during any stage of the settlement process.

Frequently asked questions

When do I pay stamp duty if I'm buying a home?

Generally, you will find that stamp duty is included in the purchase price of the home you are buying. For example, if you are buying a home for $300,000 and the stamp duty in your state is $7,500, then the actual purchase price of the home is $307,500. This means that basically, you will be paying stamp duty when you settle the transaction.

Note, though, that if you've decided to build your home, you can save a fair amount on stamp duty because you will only pay it once, when you purchase the land. When you start building the home, you won't have to pay stamp duty again and since the price of the land will generally be lower than purchasing an established home, you can save quite a bit on this tax.

When do I pay stamp duty on my loan?

Stamp duty is payable up front when you are applying for a loan, exactly like the deposit and application fee. So, you need to make sure you do your calculations properly in advance to make sure you have enough cash available to have the loan and sale processed. Some recommend that you allow a minimum of 10% of the purchase price besides your deposit for things to go smoothly but the best approach is to consult a professional and have everything calculated in advance just to make sure you don't need more since there are also other fees involved.

When is stamp duty payable?

Stamp duty is payable in a number of situations. For example, stamp duty may have to be paid if you are selling or buying a larger item such as a car or boat.

Of course, you will also have to pay stamp duty when purchasing a home, so you need to be prepared since it can be a fairly high tax.

Stamp duty is also payable when a property is transferred from one person to another. Most people only associate this tax with an actual sale of property but it is payable even if there is a simple transfer. A transfer refers to a property being given by one person to another without any funds being exchanged.

For example, if a married couple gets a divorce and one person becomes the owner of the property, this is known as a transfer of property. Likewise, if the property passes to a person as an inheritance after the death of a relative, this is also considered a transfer of property. In both cases, stamp duty will be charged when the property is transferred and will be calculated based on the market value of the property in question.

There are certain exceptions, though, where property transfers will not be charged stamp duty. There are some situations in which the de facto partner or spouse receives the property via a divorce in which they won't be charged tax. Additionally, stamp duty will not be charged if joint tenants transfer the property to tenants in common in equal shares or the latter transfer the property to the original joint tenants.

When it comes to property transfer, it's best to check with a professional to ensure whether or not you have to pay stamp duty and exactly how much you will need to pay.

Are there any exemptions from stamp duty?

While stamp duty is a pretty hefty cost for anyone purchasing a property, there are certain exemptions you may be eligible for. In certain states, if the purchase price or value of your property is below a certain level, you might find that you can enjoy a relatively low rate as you will get an exemption because you are purchasing a low value property.

Also, in many states, if this is the first home you are buying, you can get certain exemptions.

In some areas you will be able to avoid paying stamp duty completely while in others you will receive a discount. However, some states offer a first home owner's grant which can be used to pay the stamp duty instead of waiving the fee completely. So, if you are eligible for the grant and you use it to pay stamp duty, it's basically like not paying this tax at all.

How is the stamp duty Exemption Act applied?

If are purchasing a home or a property in Australia, you can expect to pay stamp duty. However, depending on your personal circumstances, the value of the property and the type of property, there are situations in which you may be exempt from paying this tax.

For example, in New South Wales, if you are purchasing your first property and it's worth less than $500,000, then you won't have to pay this tax. This also applies to properties worth less than $350,000.

In Victoria, you are exempt from paying stamp duty in the following circumstances:

  • If you are an elderly citizen with a pensioners card
  • If you are a first time home buyer with a family
  • If the property will be used as your principal residence
  • If you are buying a farm that you will be using for primary production

In Queensland, properties purchased as gifts, that are transferred from one owner to another or will be used as the principal place of residence are not subject to stamp duty. Additionally, stamp duty will be waived in the case of a change of tenure or the purchase of a manufactured home.

In South Australia, only homes worth less than $80,500 are exempt from stamp duty while in Western Australia, you will have to pay this tax regardless.

In the Northern Territory, you are eligible for stamp duty exemption if the property was received as a settlement in full or in part, if it is a farm that will be used for primary production or if it is a family home in joint names.

While there are no exemptions on stamp duty in the Australian Capital Territory, you will only have to pay $20 for properties worth less than $349,800.

As a Tasmanian resident, you are exempt from this tax if you received the property as a result of transfer between partners or if you have become the owner of it after a divorce or relationship breakdown.

How do I budget for the stamp duty costs on my new home?

Budgeting for stamp duty costs when purchasing a new home requires a bit of research. First and foremost, you have to consider approximately how much you will be paying for the property and what state you are making the purchase in. This is because in some states, the market value of the property will supersede the purchase price if it is higher. Also consider whether you will be paying stamp duty on your loan or not, since this will mean that you have to pay it upfront.

The easiest way to get an idea of how much your stamp duty will cost you is to use a stamp duty calculator. While the figure won't be exact, it will still provide enough of a guideline for you to create a budget. On the other hand, if you want an exact figure, you can ask a professional to calculate the cost of this tax for you as he or she can take into consideration your personal circumstances.

Don't forget that in some states and some situations you might be exempt from paying stamp duty so make sure to do your research thoroughly.

How much stamp duty will you pay?

The amount of stamp duty you will pay depends on the type of property you are purchases as well as your status. Rates vary across the country and can change quite often, depending whether or not the state governments are trying to encourage people to purchase homes. Generally, the rates are based on a sliding scale, with percentages increasing according to the value of the property.

Note that you might be eligible for an exemption or a discount depending on the area you live in and the type of property you are buying as well as your status. For example, in some states, first time home buyers will be fully exempted from paying stamp duty while in others senior citizens are exempt or receive a discount.

It pays to check that your information is up to date before trying to figure out how much stamp duty you will have to pay.

When will you have to pay stamp duty?

You usually have to pay stamp duty right before settlement to avoid delays but generally not longer than three months after the contracts are exchanged to avoid paying interest charges. Note, though, that in New South Wales, you will have to pay the tax as soon as the contracts are exchanged.

However, in other areas things aren't quite as strict. Thus, if settlement is approximately six weeks from when contracts are exchanged, you should pay the tax two weeks before that to avoid any delays in the transaction going through. If settlement is longer than six weeks, you don't have to pay it quite so early but you should do it within three months of the date of exchange or you will end up paying interest.

If you aren't taking out a loan to purchase the property, you should pay your stamp duty within three months of the exchange to avoid paying interest. In the case in which you are buying an off the plan residential unit, stamp duty needs to be paid within 12 months or when the contract is completed, whichever is earlier.

In terms of commercial units, if you are buying an off plan one that is subject to subdivision, you will need to pay within three months of contract exchange to avoid interest. Note that if you don't pay on time, you won't be able to register your title and the transaction will fall through. The result is that you are liable to lose your deposit and have to pay late settlement penalties.

How do I pay my stamp duty?

Paying stamp duty is not all that difficult, as long as you have the funds available. You will generally receive a notice through the mail to the address of the property you have purchased or a specified address if you chose a different mailing address. The letter will contain all the information regarding this tax, including the amount you need to pay.

In terms of when it needs to be paid, each state differs, but on average you will have about three months to make the payment in full. Note that you can't avoid paying it and if you are late, you will incur interest charges and other costs since you won't be able to complete the transaction.

Physically paying the tax is usually a matter of depositing the money in the account provided in the letter. You can do this via direct deposit, bank transfer, cheque or credit card. You don't need to worry, though, because all the payment options will be mentioned in the letter.

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Marc Terrano

A passionate publisher who loves to tell a story. Learning and teaching personal finance is his main lot at finder.com.au. Talk to him to find out more about home loans.

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263 Responses to Stamp Duty Calculator

  1. Default Gravatar
    Dollies | June 1, 2016

    I would like to transfer my own property to a trust, do I have to pay stamp duty? Can stamp duty be exempt?

    • Staff
      Marc | June 2, 2016

      Hi Dollies,
      thanks for the question.

      Stamp duty rules vary by state to state, but generally speaking stamp duty is payable when property that is owned by an individual is moved into a trust.

      For more information about what will apply to you, please contact the relevant land department for your state.

      I hope this helps,
      Marc.

  2. Default Gravatar
    Lynne | May 21, 2016

    I am on the old age pension and intend to buy a block of land and build a home on it in NSW as my primary residence. What do I have to pay stamp duty on. If I was to buy an established home do I have to pay the full amount of stamp duty

    • Staff
      Jodie | May 23, 2016

      Hi Lynne,

      Thank you for contacting finder.com.au we are a financial comparison website and general information website we are not tax or property experts so can only offer generalised advice.

      If you purchase the land as a house and land package, in which the contract to build the property is part of the same contract as the purchase of the land, you will pay stamp duty on the whole house and land value. If you purchase the land and wait until this is paid off to start your build you will only pay stamp duty on the land value, you can read more on buying land and building here.

      Regards
      Jodie

  3. Default Gravatar
    Mary | April 22, 2016

    Hi there,
    My husbands parents are in their 80′s and we have discussed this scenario with them:
    -transferring their home into our names ( granny flat ruling)
    -building a granny flat adjacent to their house for them to live in and we move into the house.
    - we would finance the build by increasing our mortgage but then we would rent our house when we move into theirs.
    I would become their carer although at the moment they do get assistance ( cleaning , groceries , gardening)
    We would like some information on what fees etc we would be facing ? This home has been their principle place of residence for the last 16 years and theoretically they will still be at that address. We would like to do this as soon as possible with them as we feel they really can’t live on their own much longer.
    Thanks
    Mary

    • Staff
      Belinda | April 26, 2016

      Hi Mary,

      Thanks for reaching out.

      To transfer property ownership, your husband’s parents will generally need to pay stamp duty, legal fees and valuation charges. However, keep in mind that some transfers may be exempt from stamp duty depending on the state in which the property is located.

      We have an article about how to minimise fees when transferring property within the family which you may find helpful.

      To add your names to the property title, you’ll need to complete and submit a transfer of title form which you can access from your local Office of State Revenue (OSR) website. You can learn more about the process here.

      If you need personal advice about the costs of this strategy, then I suggest speaking with a licensed conveyancer.

      I would also take caution with applying for a mortgage increase as this can significantly increase your interest repayments. I recommend speaking to a mortgage broker or accountant before taking action to ensure that you can afford the new repayments (and that your rental income will be sufficient to service the repayments).

      All the best,
      Belinda

  4. Default Gravatar
    Ann | March 1, 2016

    My husband and I are separating after 36 yrs of marriage. We jointly own a family home and a holiday home. We want to transfer the family home to my name and the holiday home to my husband. How do we do this and do we have to pay stamp duty?

    • Staff
      Belinda | March 2, 2016

      Hi Ann,

      Thanks for reaching out, and I’m sorry to hear about your situation.

      To transfer the ownership of each property, you’ll need to remove the relevant name from each property title. The process and costs involved with this transfer depends on the state in which the property is located, but generally you’ll need to complete and lodge a transfer of title form (stamped by the Office of State Revenue). The form can be obtained from your state government website. For example, in NSW, you can access the transfer form from the Land and Property Information (LPI) website.

      We have a page about how to remove someone’s name from a property title and you might also be interested to view our article about changing property ownership.

      Generally, you need to pay stamp duty when you change the ownership of a property. It is normally calculated at 3-5.5% of the value of the land. However, in some cases stamp duty may be waived so it’s best to check with your state government department.

      Use our stamp duty calculator on this page to estimate how much you might be liable for.

      Thanks,
      Belinda

  5. Default Gravatar
    Michelle | January 1, 2016

    Hi, My mother and I purchased our house approx 14 year ago and have been paying the load off together however only her name is on the title/deed, we now want to re-mortgage to consolidate some smaller loans and were told by our current lender that as I am not on the title/deed, it was denied even though the current mortgage has been in our both names the entire time. Would we still have to pay to have my name added?

    Thanks.

    • Staff
      Belinda | January 4, 2016

      Hi Michelle,

      Thanks for reaching out.

      I believe that the process and paperwork for adding someone’s name to a property title would be similar to that of adding a long-term partner or spouse, you can learn more about this process here. However, please note that the process and cost involved may vary from state to state so you should check with your state Office of State Revenue (OSR) or your local department of Land and Property. We also have a guide about changing property ownership which you might find useful.

      On this page, you can learn about how to minimize fees and charges when transferring property ownership within the family.

      I hope you find this useful.

      Regards,
      Belinda

  6. Default Gravatar
    Neelam | December 7, 2015

    What is the interest charged if i want to pay the stamp duty with the home loan. I bought the property at 638000 at nsw and am a first home buyer.

    • Staff
      Belinda | December 9, 2015

      Hi Neelam,

      Thanks for reaching out.

      I’ve sent you an email to follow up with this enquiry.

      Thanks,
      Belinda

  7. Default Gravatar
    Roberto | November 17, 2015

    I own a property in my name. I have been married for 32 years and want to add my spouse’s name to the title (as joint tenant). I want to do this without being liable to stamp duty. Is the only way to do this to have a court ordered “property settlement”?

    • Staff
      Belinda | November 17, 2015

      Hi Roberto,

      Thanks for your enquiry.

      You can read about how to minimise costs when transferring property ownership within the family on this page and this page.

      In most cases, you’ll be eligible from paying stamp duty when adding a partner’s name to the property title, including married couples. To realise this exemption, you’ll need to contact your State Office of Revenue to obtain an exemption form.

      Thanks,
      Belinda

  8. Default Gravatar
    Lola | November 5, 2015

    Do pensioners in NSW receive any reduction in Stamp Duty when buying a new home, apart from the $5,000?

    • Staff
      Belinda | November 10, 2015

      Hi Lola,

      Thanks for your question.

      I’ve sent you an email with some information regarding this enquiry.

      Thanks,
      Belinda

  9. Default Gravatar
    Jag | October 26, 2015

    Hi there, I have my first home financed from Keystart for $425,000 in Jan 2015 and now looking to refinance, so do I have to pay the stamp duty again as the amount is less $ 415,000 then what I got financed from Keystart Loans?

    • Staff
      Jodie | October 29, 2015

      Hi Jag,

      Thank you for reaching out to finder.com.au, a financial comparison website and general information service.

      We are not qualified property tax specialists so cannot accurate tell you if you will be obligated to pay additional stamp duty if you refinance however there seems to be some instances that you may be able to avoid this if refinancing so it would be best to speak to the lender you are looking to refinance with or even a mortgage broker.

      Regards
      Jodie

  10. Default Gravatar
    Karen | September 15, 2015

    In Victoria if a husband owns 100% of the investment property, and he transfers 50% of ownership to his wife will stamp duty apply?

    IF so is the stamp duty calculated on 50% of the market value on the day of the transfer??

    • Staff
      Marc | September 15, 2015

      Hi Karen,
      thanks for the question.

      There’s an exemption on stamp duty when transferring property between a spouse/partner in Victoria.

      I hope this helps,
      Marc.

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