Samsung will block Note 7 handsets on Australian networks

Alex Kidman 1 December 2016

man_burningphones_shutterstock_450

If you’re still foolish enough to be holding onto a Note 7, you’re going to find yourself blocked from mobile service soon.

Samsung Australia has indicated that while only a "small number" of Note 7 devices are still in consumer hands following the recall of all Note 7 handsets worldwide, it’s still on the case to keep the wider public safe. It recently instituted over-the-air firmware updates that limited the battery charging capacity of Note 7 handsets.

From the middle of the month, it will also be working with Australian carriers making it impossible to connect to network services if you’re using a Note 7 device. A Note 7 that can’t make calls or connect to mobile data services would be a much less compelling option, so Samsung is hopeful that this will see the last few devices in the wild returned.

To further sweeten the pot, for customers who return Note 7 devices directly to Samsung and opt to switch to either a Samsung Galaxy S7 or Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge, they’ll receive the difference in costing plus a $250 offer. That offer extends to many of Samsung’s device selling partners as well, with full details available on Samsung’s recall site.

Latest mobile phones headlines


Follow us for all the latest mobile phone news and deals


Image: Shutterstock

Get the best deal on your mobile phone

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, read the PDS or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.
Ask a question