RNDR is now the world’s largest cloud rendering network

Posted: 18 October 2018 5:32 pm
News

Even in beta, RNDR's distributed rendering network is pushing the limits.

Render Network, future home of the RNDR token, aims to democratise computing power. It connects people who have rendering jobs to do with those who have the spare computing power to lend to the effort. Distributed rendering networks aren't a (that) new thing, with various cloud service providers offering distributed rendering farms where needed.

But none of them can match the power of RNDR's global rendering network it seems, according to a recent RNDR survey.



By the numbers

RNDR was created by the relatively well-known tech firm OTOY, whose tech you may have seen in the opening sequences of Westworld. And even in beta, RNDR is already harnessing the power of over 14,000 GPUs for a combined rendering power of 1.5 million OctaneBench (OB).

juicy crypto wordsFor some perspective, a 60 cents per hour G2 instance on Amazon Web Services delivers around 37 OB, while OTOY's previous solution capped out at under 1 million OB due to the inherent capacity and network speed issues of centralised solutions.

"It's impossible to leverage GPUs throughout the world efficiently without some sort of decentralized system that tracks and manages render jobs," RNDR notes.

A decentralised system can not only harness a lot more GPUs around the world, without the usual hassles of buying tens of thousands of video cards, but can also distribute resources more efficiently and without scraping the usual limitations.

"We have been working for quite some time now to build the RNDR network and have reached unprecedented levels in cloud computing, putting us at the top with the largest tech companies in the world," says Jules Orbach, CEO of OTOY. "Our vision when we first began this journey was to scale and democratise rendering, creating more efficient processes and to reach not only high-power Hollywood studios, but also everyday content creators who might not otherwise have access to this technology. RNDR is the key to ushering in the increasingly virtual future of entertainment – from AR to VR to video games to film.

"This significant milestone demonstrates that we are that much closer to reaching our goal, and we can't wait to show the world what we can do in the near future."

However, it's not the only decentralised blockchain cryptocurrency rendering platform. Golem (GNT), a more general decentralised cloud computing platform, is one of the earliest projects to launch on Ethereum.

RNDR is definitely the largest and most powerful cloud rendering network right now though. Imagine how big it could get after its full release later this year.


Disclosure: At the time of writing, the author holds ETH, IOTA, ICX, VET, XLM, BTC and ADA.

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