Lenovo ThinkVision T24i-20 Review: A monitor for the business basics

Quick verdict: Lenvovo’s ThinkVision T24i-20 is a business-first monitor with a rotating display and just a few key extra features.

Pros

  • Rotatable display
  • Choice of inputs
  • Decent screen output
  • Height adjustable
Cons

  • Only 1080p
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • Access to half the USB ports is tricky

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Finder score: 3.5
How we score our reviews

Lenovo's ThinkVision monitors don't shy away from their business-centric approach, and the Lenovo ThinkVision T24i-20 is no exception. It's a business-first 1080p/Full HD capable work monitor with features particularly suited to multi-monitor usage and peripheral attachment at a reasonable price. There's few surprises here, but equally few real shocks either.


Design

Design

  • 23.8 inch Full HD panel
  • Rotating display
  • USB ports
Lenovo ThinkVision T24i-20

The ThinkVision T24i-20 offers up a 23.8 inch, 1920x1080 pixel IPS LCD display with a standard 60Hz refresh rate, all of which is well within the scope of a business monitor of this type. Likewise, connectivity to your external devices is a matter of choice, with support for VGA, HDMI 1.4 or DisplayPort 1.2 connectivity.

The ThinkVision T24i-20 comes with what is essentially the same height adjustable stand we saw on the Lenovo ThinkVision P27h. that can also rotate the display through 90 degrees if you favour or need a vertical display, although as always you'll have to do some careful cable management before you start your screen spinning in place.

The base of the ThinkVision T24i-20 is nicely solid, with a good locking mechanism for the height arm. You also get an optional use slot at the front of the base. It's wide enough to fit a smartphone as its own stand in landscape mode, although if you've got the display at its lowest, a smartphone in portrait mode will obscure part of the screen.

The ThinkVision T24i-20 also includes four USB A type sockets for connected devices as suits your needs.

Two of the provided USB ports are located on the side of the panel's rear and are reasonably easy to access, but the other two do require a little setup work.

It may not be immediately apparent, but to get them to do anything you've first got to connect the supplied USB cable to a spare USB port on your connected machine, at which point they act as effective extended ports of that PC. Because they sit at the back underside like any other port, access isn't particularly easy, so it's a good idea to do all your peripheral plugging upfront, unless you like playing the "find the socket blind and upside down" game.


Performance

Performance

  • Easy setup
  • Fair but not exciting visuals
  • Contrast could be punchier
Lenovo ThinkVision T24i-20

Setting up the ThinkVision T24i-20 beyond cabling is nicely simple, with an onscreen menu controlled with front-facing buttons to select inputs, colour modes, USB port settings and brightness/contrast settings. Likewise, the rotation, tilt and height angles are easy to set depending on your needs and preferences.

Actual screen quality for a Full HD business monitor is fine; I've mostly been using the ThinkVision T24i-20 as a secondary display during my review period because of its lack of a higher refresh rate than 60Hz, but that's a very specific taste call. Where the ThinkVision T24i-20 is perhaps a tad lacking is in overall contrast, with a stated 1:1000 ratio sitting on the low side. Likewise, if you're after a home office monitor that's going to act as both a work and entertainment hub, the 60Hz refresh rate isn't that exciting either.

Most business cases are just fine at 60Hz, and indeed I could run more visually intensive content such as games across the ThinkVision T24i-20 without too many issues. It's not what it's built for (and naturally the boss will sack you if you're caught doing so outside a games design studio) but it functions perfectly fine in this respect.

That very much speaks to what the ThinkVision T24i-20 is for. It's not the biggest monitor for work purposes, and it's not the fanciest either. It just gets the job done.


Should you buy the Lenovo ThinkVision T24i-20?

  • Buy it if you want a business-specific rotatable monitor for work purposes.
  • Don't buy it if you need higher resolution or refresh rates.
Finder score: 3.5
How we score our reviews

The ThinkVision T24i-20 offers a decent suite of features for work purposes, but it's also worth weighing up your specific needs in a PC monitor before purchasing one, given its asking price.

If you're after slicker visual refresh rates or resolutions, that's not what it offers. The design is entirely business-suitable, but that also means it's just a touch on the dull side too. There's just something that screams "cubicle worker" about the ThinkVision design, and there's no getting past that.


Pricing and availability

Price

Lenovo sells the ThinkVision T24i-20 monitor in Australia for $279.

Where to buy


Specifications

Specs

Category
Home and office
Contrast Ratio
1000:1
Monitor Format
Full HD LED Backlit LCD
Monitor Resolution
1920 x 1080
Monitor Technology
IPS
Response Time
4
Screen Size
23.8

Features

Hdmi Inputs
1
Vga Inputs
1

Images: Alex Kidman

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