Leading crypto podcasts and shows go VR with VideoCoin launch

Posted: 9 August 2019 10:54 am
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People simply remember things better in 3D than they do in 2D. Easy VR streaming could be an easy win for content creators.

A range of popular cryptocurrency personalities have gone virtual reality through the Blockchain VR Network, a VideoCoin-powered Live Planet VR system.

The Live Planet VR system is essentially a way of directly streaming 360-degree videos for VR platforms and similar, while VideoCoin is a decentralised video encoding, storage and blockchain distribution system, utilising people's spare system resources for the task.

The first to get the VR treatment here include a range of cryptocurrency-related shows, such as Bad Crypto and the BLOCKTV 24/7 live crypto and blockchain program.

"This is an opportunity to revolutionize how listeners learn about blockchain and experience our podcast," said Bad Crypto co-host Joel Comm. "We are thrilled to be among the first to bring The Bad Crypto Podcast into the realm of virtual reality by joining the Blockchain VR Network."

Sure, jumping from an audio program to VR feels kind of like skipping a step, but maybe that's the point.

Thinking in 3D

While VR-ifying some relatively straightforward shows might seem like a mildly underwhelming way of using VR, it's worth noting that mundane applications will likely be the main purposes of VR and AR, and virtual reality almost certainly has a bright future as a teaching tool.

In that respect, these shows might be a perfect way of beginning.

Google Glass might present the clearest example. It flopped after it turned out people rightfully didn't really want to wear them in public, then found a brisk resurrection in business applications. As it turns out, the combination of hands-free headsets and an augmented reality heads up display is a powerful combination, and people are still in the process of working out just what they can do with it.

Virtual reality will probably be the same.

It lets shoppers stroll the aisles of virtual stores, or see what their dream home would really look like on the inside and out before completion. It lets people remotely meet "face to face" in a way video conferencing can't quite manage. It lets people train on new procedures by actually physically(ish) carrying them out in cyberspace, rather than just trying to memorise steps. And maybe it can also help explain how blockchain works.

Easy VR could be an easy win-win for educational content creators, because people simply remember virtual reality things better than flat screen things.



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Disclosure: The author holds BNB, BTC at the time of writing.

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