buy international shares in Australia

How to buy international shares in Australia

Easily diversify your portfolio with this guide on how to buy foreign stocks.

While you can trade shares in Australia, the global market is just a click away with plenty of options for new and experienced investors. The global share market is a lot like anywhere else, and trading there isn’t that difficult once you know how.

This guide will explain what to look for in an international share trading account, how to open one and what to do with the account once you’ve opened it. Read on to learn more, or start with the basics of share trading if it’s all new to you. If you already know how to buy international shares, you can simply compare brokers and and open an account.

Share Trading Account Offer

IG Share Trading

$0.00

monthly fee

$8.00

standard trade

Share Trading Account Offer

Competitive broker fees on Australian and international shares

  • Monthly fee: $0.00
  • Brokerage fee - standard trade: $8.00
  • International: Yes
  • Support - After hours: Yes
  • Type of broker: Online only
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Trade international shares with one of these brokers

Rates last updated August 16th, 2018
Name Product Monthly Fee Margin trading - Online IPOs / Floats International Description
IG Share Trading
$0
Yes
Yes
Yes
Low brokerage fees on Australian and international shares. Earn 25 Qantas Points when you trade Australian shares, 50 Qantas Points when you trade international shares (T&C's apply).
Saxo Capital Markets Share Trading
$0
Yes
No
Yes
Access over 19,000 Australian and global shares.
HalifaxOnline
$0
Yes
Yes
Yes
Trade US and Australian shares, options, futures and CFDs with no registration fees. Trade 24/7 on your desktop, tablet or smartphone.

Compare up to 4 providers

Updated August 16th, 2018
Name Product Minimum Opening Deposit Major Trading Instruments Commission (ASX 200 Shares) Platforms
$0
Indices, FX, Shares, Commodities, Cryptocurrency, ETPs
0.10% with $8 minimum
MetaTrader 4
ProReal Time
Trade from over 10,000 markets with Australia's leading service for CFD trading and forex. Introductory offer: receive a reduced commission for the first two weeks.
$0
Indices, FX, Shares, Commodities, Cryptocurrency, Treasuries
0.09% with a $7 minimum
CMC Next Generation CFD
AUD$3,000
Indices, FX, Shares, Commodities, ETFs
0.10% with $6 minimum
SaxoTraderGo
SaxoTrader
More than 9,000 CFDs including single stocks, stock indices and commodities
$0
Indices, FX, Shares, Commodities
0.07% with $5 minimum
MetaTrader 4
CloudTrade
Welcome bonus of up to $500 after your first month. T&C's apply.
Trade CFDs on local and international shares, forex and commodities.
$0
Indices, FX, Shares, Commodities, ETFs
0.12% with $10 minimum
Halifax Pro
Halifax Plus
Trade US and Australian shares, options, futures and CFDs with no registration fees. Trade 24/7 on your desktop, tablet or smartphone.
AU$100
Indices, FX, Shares, Commodities, Cryptocurrency, ETFs, International futures
No commission
Plus500 Web Trader
$30 welcome bonus available. T&C's apply.
Trade Australian and international CFDs on shares, forex, indices, commodities and more.
US$200
Indices, FX, Commodities, Cryptocurrency
No commission
MetaTrader 4
MetaTrader 5
cTrader
Trade stock indices on the global market, via Pepperstone's MetaTrader 4 and cTrader client terminals.

Compare up to 4 providers

Updated August 16th, 2018
Name Product Minimum Opening Deposit Minimum Spreads for Major Currencies Commission Minimum Trade Size Platforms
$0
0.6 - 1.5 pips
$0
1 lot
MetaTrader 4
ProReal Time
$0
0.7 - 1.5 pips
$0
0.01 lots
CMC Standard & Pro
AU$3,000
0.6 - 1.1 pips
$0
5,000 units
SaxoTrader
SaxoTraderGO
US$200
0.0 - 0.1 pips
AU$3.50 per 100k traded
0.01 lots
MetaTrader 4
MetaTrader 5
cTrader
AU$200
0.0 pips - 1.0 pips
$0
0.01 lots
MetaTrader 4
MetaTrader 5
WebTrader
$0
From 0.0 pips
$0
0.01 lots
MetaTrader 4
MetaTrader 5
WebTrader
$0
0.8 - 3.0 pips
$0
0.1 lots
MetaTrader 4
CloudTrade

Compare up to 4 providers

Step 1: Compare options and choose a broker

There are many different account options to choose from, and it’s worth comparing them like you would any other financial product. Consider:

Brokerage fees

How much commission does the account charge for the execution of a trade? There may be flat rates, percentage rates or even no brokerage fees at all.

Access to markets

Which international markets does the account let you trade on? The big ones are the US markets like the NYSE and NASDAQ, which most providers will allow you to you access, but not every account will let you trade everywhere in Europe and Asia.

Speed

How long does it take for a transaction to be executed? Timeliness can be important when trading internationally.

The buffer

How big is the buffer? Most international share trade orders will have a 'buffer' applied to them by the share trading platform provider. The buffer is a percentage of the order value, which is added onto the cost of the order to protect the provider from currency fluctuations while the trade clears, ensuring that they don’t lose money on routine trades.

Exchange rates

How much of a cut does your provider take? When converting currencies, the provider may take a cut in the form of a percentage fee on currency converted. With big trades this can be a significant amount.

Signup fees

Does the provider charge any fees for opening an account with them? The benefits they offer may not always be worth it.

Research tools

What investment research tools are available? Are you seeing real time market information or is there a delay? Are the research tools free to use or do they cost extra? It’s a lot easier to buy low and sell high when you’ve done your research, rather than relying on luck alone.

Customer service and access

Does your provider have a share trading mobile app, or desktop access only? Can you contact the provider outside of business hours? What are your options for getting in touch with them? Are they known for being helpful or not so much? When you open an international share trading account you’re using a service and you should expect a certain level of customer assistance.

Limits

Do you have to spend more than you want, or not as much as you want? One of the main restrictions to look out for when choosing an account is the presence of limits, which may be minimums or maximums that apply. You may not be able to make trades above or below a certain dollar value.

Step 2: Open your account

Once you've decided on an online broker, you can open your share trading account. If you already have a bank account with that provider then you can usually sign in via their online banking portal. If not, you will have to open a new account. To open an international share trading account you'll generally need to meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Be 18 or over
  • Have an Australian residential address
  • Have a mobile number

As part of the application process you will typically need to provide:

  • Personal photographic identification (for example your drivers license, passport and/or proof of age card)
  • An Australian business number (ABN) and/or tax file number (TFN) if applicable

When opening the account you'll be asked to choose whether you’ll be trading as an individual, with a joint account (for example, with your partner), as a company or organisation or on behalf of a trust (for example a SMSF). Because share trading has income and tax implications you must provide details of your income and occupation. Along with your personal information, you may be required to disclose the source of your income and the origin of your financial position.

After you’ve provided your personal details, you’re up to the account set-up stage. This involves providing the details of your linked bank account, setting up financing options if applicable and choosing from the various options that may be available. Once you’ve confirmed everything and double checked your details, you’re ready to load your cash management account and start trading.

Already have a share trading account?

Usually providers will require that you open one account for local shares and a separate account for international shares. If you already have a local account, you can open an international one in just a few quick steps. For example, with CommSec, login to your account, click on Portfolio > Offers and Apply > Applications > Add a new international account > Apply Now. Then simply choose the account you wish to link the international trading account to and submit your application.

buy international shares-7

Step 3: Fund your account and start trading

If you want to start trading right away, you'll need to make sure you have enough funds in your linked international account to execute the trades, plus any broker fees that will apply. Remember that when you transfer funds into your linked foreign currency account you'll usually have to pay a foreign currency conversion fee, so it's best not to be transferring funds in and out of the account on a regular basis. It can take a few days for your funds to be loaded into the cash account, so keep this in mind when you decide you'd like to make a trade.

Once you’ve set everything up, you can trade online through your new international share trading account. Expect to see a dashboard with features such as current share prices and changes over time and options to buy, sell or research. With the big banks and other trading accounts geared towards beginners, you may find tutorials and introductory material to help acquaint you with the available features.

What’s the difference between Australian and international share trading?

When trading shares, you can choose to do it domestically or internationally.

Domestic

Trade shares listed on Australian stock exchanges. Trade within certain business hours and access only Australian investment options, which make up about 2% of the global market.

Australian stock exchanges include the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX), National Stock Exchange (NSX) and Chi-X.

International

Trade shares from global markets around the world 24 hours a day, subject to local market hours, including big global brands and household names. Gain access to more options, but also experience more risks and challenges.

International stock exchanges include the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), London Stock Exchange (LSE), the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations System (NASDAQ) and many others.

Compared to domestic trading, there are both advantages and disadvantages to trading shares internationally.

Advantages of international share trading:

  • Gain access to a wider variety of investment options.
  • An internationally diversified portfolio can help protect you from the downturns of the Australian market.
  • You can trade 24 hours a day rather than only within set business hours.
  • More buyers: The actual value of your shares depends on how much you can sell them for. When trading internationally, there may be a larger number of different interested buyers and you might find it's easier finding a buyer.

Disadvantages of international share trading:

  • Exchange rates can fluctuate and can significantly hurt (or help) your return on investment.
  • Foreign policy can affect your returns. It’s possible that changes to another country’s foreign policies, local instability or other issues can impact the value of your investment in ways beyond your control. This is a largely uncontrollable risk.
  • Taxation and related issues may be more complicated when trading international shares.
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Some extra tips:

Making big trades? Look for lower exchange rates, research tools that allow you to make more reliable investments and flat broker fees rather than percentage rates. Where applicable, it may be worth accepting higher flat fees in exchange for lower percentage rates. Avoid low maximum limits which might constrain your trading.

Making a lot of small trades? You may want to avoid flat fees that take a big chunk out of the potential profits of each trade and stick to percentage rates that will cost you less. Low maximums are less of an issue, but high minimums might be a problem.

How will you diversify your portfolio? Not all accounts will give you the same options. Plan what kind of trades you want to make and consider whether a given account will let you trade CFDs, whether you can trade ETOs and/or ETFs and if you are able to do forex trading through the same platform.

Andrew Munro

Andrew writes for finder.com, comparing products, writing guides and looking for new ways to help people make smart decisions. He's a fan of insurance, business news and cryptocurrency.

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