New government plan gives free car rego to heavy toll users in NSW

Elizabeth Barry 22 November 2017 NEWS

car tolls

Some drivers will be able to save up to $715 a year.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian has this week announced a plan to give free car registration to NSW drivers that are spending a lot on toll roads. Drivers will be eligible for free rego if they spend more than $25 a week on average over a 12-month period on tolls.

According to the Premier, this will lead to substantial savings.

“The majority of eligible motorists will save $358 a year on registration costs, with potential savings of up to $715 a year,” Berejiklian said.

The scheme will be available to the following vehicles from 1 July 2018:

  • All standard privately registered cars
  • 4 wheel drives
  • Motorcycles

The scheme will also be backdated, so if you have driven an eligible vehicle and spent more than $25 a week on tolls from 1 July 2017, you'll be eligible for free rego. The scheme only applies to private drivers and excludes trucks, but will extend to any toll roads that open in the future.

This is the second recent announcement from the NSW Government to help drivers cut down on costs. The Premier announced a lower cost CTP Greenslip scheme last week, allowing drivers to potentially save up to $172 on their Green Slip.

However, if you aren't eligible for the scheme and need a way to finance your car registration, there are still loans available.

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