0% Foreign Fees Credit Cards

Compare credit cards with 0% foreign fees and save money when you shop with businesses that are based overseas.

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Credit cards with no foreign transaction fees are designed to help you save money by offering 0% fees when you're travelling overseas or shopping online with an international retailer. In comparison, most other credit cards charge a fee of 2–3% of each international transaction you make.

Use this guide to compare 0% foreign fee cards to find one that best suits your needs.

Bankwest Credit Card Offer

Bankwest Zero Platinum Mastercard

$0 annual fee
0% foreign transaction fees

Eligibility criteria, terms and conditions, fees and charges apply

Bankwest Credit Card Offer

Save with a $0 annual fee, 0% foreign transaction fees and a balance transfer offer. Plus, complimentary overseas travel insurance.

  • Ongoing $0 annual fee
  • 17.99% p.a. purchase rate | 21.99% p.a. cash advance rate
  • 0% foreign transaction fees online and overseas
  • 2.99% on balance transfers for 9 months, reverts to 17.99% p.a.
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Compare No Foreign Currency Exchange Fee Credit Cards

Data indicated here is updated regularly
Name Product Foreign Currency Conversion Fee Overseas ATM withdrawal fee Purchase rate (p.a.) Annual fee
Bankwest Zero Platinum Mastercard

0%
$0
17.99% p.a.
$0 p.a.
Offers a $0 annual fee, 0% foreign transaction fees, complimentary international travel insurance and a balance transfer offer.
Skye Mastercard

0%
$0
23.99% p.a.
$49 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($99 p.a. thereafter)
Get up to $300 cashback, 110 days interest-free on everyday purchases, 0% foreign transaction fees and flexible instalment plan options.
Coles Rewards Mastercard

0%
$5
19.99% p.a.
$99 p.a.
Earn 2 flybuys points / $1 spent and save with a 0% balance transfer offer. Plus, 0% international transaction fees on purchases.
Westpac Lite Card

0%
9.9% p.a.
$108 p.a.
Keep credit card costs low with a maximum credit limit of $4,000, a 9.9% p.a. purchase interest rate and no foreign transaction fees.
Latitude 28° Global Platinum Mastercard

0%
$0
21.99% p.a.
$0 p.a.
Save with 0% foreign transaction fees on purchases. Plus, complimentary flight delay passes and a global wifi access.
Bankwest Breeze Platinum Mastercard

0%
$0
0% for 15 months, reverts to 12.99% p.a.
$99 p.a.
Get 0% interest on purchases for 15 months, complimentary travel insurance and no foreign transaction fees.
HSBC Low Rate Credit Card

0%
12.99% p.a.
$99 p.a.
Receive up to 20 months interest-free on balance transfers with a 2% BT fee. Also enjoy exclusive offers with the home&Away Privilege Program.
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Compare No Foreign Currency Exchange Fee Debit Cards

Data indicated here is updated regularly
$
Name Product Card access ATM Withdrawal Fee Fee Free Deposit p.m. Monthly Account Fee
HSBC Everyday Global Account
Visa
$0
$0
Special offer: $100 cash bonus for new HSBC customers.
Earn 2% cashback on tap and pay purchases (T&C's apply).
Enjoy no minimum ongoing balance or transaction requirements and the flexibility to hold up to 10 currencies. Apple Pay and Google Pay available.
CUA Everyday Snap Account
Visa
$0
$0
Refund of international ATM withdrawal fees and international card transaction fees (conditions apply). Refund of overdrawn fees.
$0 monthly account fee. Unlimited fee-free everyday transactions.
Apple Pay, Google Pay and Samsung Pay available. Savings Top Up tool automatically transfers to linked savings account.
Xinja bank account
Mastercard
$0
$0
100% app-based everyday bank account.
$0 monthly account fee.
A digital bank account with no ATM fees in Australia or overseas, plus no currency conversion fees. Xinja app offers spending categorisation features.
Citi Global Currency Account
Mastercard
$0
$0
$0 transaction fee on international purchases.
Save on international transaction fees by using local currencies with your debit card.
If you’re shopping online on a US site, you can set your debit card transaction currency to USD to pay no international transaction fees.
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Compare Prepaid Travel Cards

Data indicated here is updated regularly
Name Product Available Currencies ATM Withdrawal Fee Initial Load Fee Reload fee
Travelex Money Card
AUD, USD, CAD, EUR, GBP, HKD, JPY, NZD, SGD, THB

Overseas: $0

Domestic: 2.95% of the amount withdrawn

1.1% of initial load value or $15, whichever is greater
1.1% of transaction value or $15, whichever is greater
Lock in exchange rates for up to 10 currencies, pay no overseas ATM fees and get exclusive merchant offers.
Cash Passport Platinum Mastercard
AUD, USD, CAD, EUR, GBP, HKD, JPY, NZD, SGD, THB, AED
USD $2.50, EUR €2.50, GBP £2.00, NZD $3.50, THB ฿80.00, CAD $3.50, HKD $18.00, JPY ¥260.00, SGD $3.50, AUD $3.50, AED 10.00
$0
$5
Up to 11 currencies on 1 card locked in exchange rates and no load fees.
NAB Traveller Card
AUD, USD, CAD, EUR, GBP, HKD, JPY, NZD, SGD, THB

Overseas: $0 per withdrawal via international ATMs

Domestic: $3.75 fee applies

$0
$0
Load up and lock in up to 10 currencies and benefit from no fees for reloading funds. Comes with a secondary card for added security.
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How do credit cards with no foreign fees work?

When you travel or shop online with a retailer that's based overseas, many cards will charge a foreign transaction fee worth around 2–3% of your purchase amount. But credit cards with 0% foreign fees waive this cost or rebate it to your account, helping you save money when you make international transactions.

How much can I save with a 0% foreign fee card?

The potential savings you can get on a credit card with no foreign transaction fees depend on how much you spend overseas and the fees you would pay on a different credit card. For example, if you spent $2,000 on your card that charges a foreign transaction fee of 3%, you would pay $60 more than you would with a card that charges a 0% foreign transaction fee.

It's also worth noting that the cost (and potential savings) may not be obvious straight away. For example, if you spent $200 a month through an online store that is based overseas, a 3% foreign transaction fee would add just $6 to your monthly account balance. However, switching to a card with a 0% foreign transaction fee would save you $72 per year.

How to compare 0% foreign fee credit cards

A bunch of credit cards offer 0% foreign transaction fees, so what else should you compare when considering a credit card for overseas spending?

  • Rebate requirements. Some credit cards automatically waive foreign transaction fees when you make overseas purchases. Others offer a rebate on foreign transaction fees when you meet specific requirements, such as spending a set amount per month. If you don't meet these requirements for a particular month or statement period, any overseas purchases made during that time will attract the applicable foreign transaction fee.
  • Annual fees. To ensure you're getting the best credit card for your spending habits, you need to weigh the cost of the annual fee against the savings you'd get from paying 0% foreign transaction fees. If the savings aren't as much as you thought, you could be better off with a $0 annual fee credit card.
  • Overseas ATM withdrawal fees. Getting cash out of an ATM overseas can also attract a fee worth up to $5 or between 2-3% of the total transaction. Some overseas ATM operators also apply an additional charge. Choosing a card that offers $0 international ATM withdrawals could allow you to avoid or reduce this cost.
  • Cash advance fees. Even if you get a credit card that offers $0 ATM fees, using it to withdraw cash will attract a cash advance fee that is worth between 2-4% of the transaction. You will also be charged interest at the cash advance interest rate, which is higher than the purchase rate on most credit cards. So if you need to get cash when you're overseas, you might want to consider using a debit card or prepaid travel card instead.
  • Purchase rate. Unless you pay your credit card balance in full each statement period, your overseas spending will be charged interest at the card's standard rate. In some cases, this could reduce the value you get from having no foreign transaction fees, so make sure you consider this cost when you're comparing different cards. If you do often carry a balance, a low rate credit card could be a more cost-effective option.
  • Other travel benefits. Some cards offer additional perks, such as complimentary travel insurance, airport lounge access or reward points for your spending. Make sure you check what requirements you need to meet to use these perks, otherwise they won't add to the value of the card.
  • Security features. As well as fraud-monitoring services and zero liability for fraudulent transactions, some credit cards offer transaction limits for overseas spending, temporary blocks and extra security through services including Verified by Visa, Mastercard SecureCode and American Express SafeKey.

Tips to protect your card when shopping online

What else do I need to think about?

When you're travelling or shopping online with an international retailer, keeping the following factors in mind can help you save on costs.

  • Currency conversion. When you use an Australian credit card to make a transaction in another currency, it will be converted back to Australian dollars based on the exchange rate that's applicable for your credit card. For example, if you spent US$100 and the applicable exchange rate was US$0.72 to AUD$1, this transaction would show up on your credit card account as AUD$138.89 (to the nearest cent).
  • Local currency vs. Australian dollar payments. Sometimes when you're travelling, a business will give you the option of paying in the local currency or in Australian dollars. If you choose to pay in Australian dollars, the transaction will be processed using Dynamic Currency Conversion, which usually costs you a lot more than paying in the local currency.
  • Other travel money options. It's often useful to have a couple of different ways to spend money when you're travelling. As well as a credit card, you may want to buy foreign currency before you go or take a debit card in case you end up needing cash when you're away. Another option is to get a prepaid travel card that lets you spend money in different currencies, which would give you another way to avoid foreign transaction fees.

Compare more travel money options

If you're a frequent traveller or regularly shop online with international retailers, a credit card that has 0% foreign transaction fees could help you keep your costs to a minimum. Just remember to compare a range of options and look at the other features available so that you can find a credit card that really suits your needs.

Pictures: Shutterstock

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146 Responses

  1. Default Gravatar
    AlexJune 21, 2019

    I am looking for a business credit card with 0% international transaction fees.

    • Default Gravatar
      NikkiJune 21, 2019

      Hi Alex,

      Thanks for getting in touch!

      As of this writing, we don’t have a list of business credit cards with 0% foreign transaction fees. If you are still looking for business credit cards, you’ll find a list of those on this page. On the page you’ll also read information about:

      – Who is responsible for the credit card? Personal vs business credit card liability
      – How to compare business credit cards
      – Pros and cons of business credit cards
      – How to apply for a business credit card

      As a friendly reminder, read the eligibility criteria, features, and details of the card, as well as the Product Disclosure Statement and Terms and Conditions before committing to the product.

      Hope this helps!

      Best,
      Nikki

  2. Default Gravatar
    NicholasFebruary 25, 2019

    I withdrew money from an ATM in the Philippines and the machine said temporary closed, and no money came out. ii wrote the time down and the date. When I got back to Australia, 28 degrees said that I put my chip in and so the transaction was valid. I wrote back that no money came out of the machine, and all machines have cameras now, so they should be able to see I got no money. Can I take this to AFCA as I should not be to blame and it has to be on camera.

    • Default Gravatar
      NikkiFebruary 26, 2019

      Hi Nicholas,

      Thanks for getting in touch and sorry to hear about what happened. You can check and inquire with AFCA how to handle the situation but make sure you have all supporting documents to validate your claim. Hope this helps!

      Best,
      Nikki

  3. Default Gravatar
    AndyDecember 19, 2018

    (Apologies for lengthy message) I love to travel and I hate paying ANY fee’s overseas. About 10 years ago I was away for 4 months and with the total fee’s I paid along the way I could have stayed away much longer, so since then I’ve searched high and low for credit/debit cards to use.
    I found 28 degrees first and that was fantastic until they changed the fee structure for having a positive amount on the card itself and using ATM’s, so I stopped using that one. Plus they introduced some fee’s for paying the card off if it went into debt.
    The past few years I’ve used Citibank debit card and that has been fantastic. I’ve paid no fee’s at all and its very simple to get hold of with no extra banking requirements to keep it – like put X amount per month in the account. I use it overseas and that’s pretty much it. Plus if you do use it in Australia at some restaurants you get a free bottle of wine!!
    Recently I changed banks and joined ING. I heard they had a similar card (Orange everyday Visa) and I managed to get hold of that as well. I’m not 100% sure if you have to deposit at least $1000 per month to get the benefit of no fee’s but as I’ve joined that bank that part is done anyway. Certainly worth a look but double check those rules.
    I would strongly suggest having a look at both the cards above as they are excellent for travel and not paying fees. I wouldn’t travel without them!
    Also, I tried an NAB travel card before and that was a total waste of time due to the poor conversion rates the banks charge, and checking other banks “Travel Cards” I found the same thing. They sound good but you are not getting the best rates on conversion and to add to a bad conversion in Thailand a few years ago I was slugged $8 a time at the ATM.
    Hope that helps someone! Happy travels.

    • Default Gravatar
      NikkiDecember 20, 2018

      Hi Andy,

      Thanks for reaching out for sharing your experience on credit cards. Feel free to get in touch with us again should you need any assistance.

      Best,
      Nikki

  4. Default Gravatar
    DaveJuly 1, 2018

    If 28 degrees card is in credit (nothing owing) and use it to withdraw cash at overseas ATM, then surely there will be no ‘cash advance fee’ or interest charged? Is that right? Thanks.

    • Default Gravatar
      NikkiJuly 2, 2018

      Hi Dave!

      Thanks for your message.

      You can withdraw or do a CASH ADVANCE from your 28 Degrees credit card at no cash advance interest rate charged. However, you will still be charged a cash advance fee and an ATM withdrawal fee (operator fee)

      Hope this clarifies.

      Regards,
      Nikki

    • Default Gravatar
      TravellerJuly 7, 2018

      Perhaps Nikki misunderstood Dave’s excellent question. Or perhaps I have!!! If your 28 degrees card has a positive balance of say $3k and you withdraw 500€ then surely there’s no cash advanced fee nor interest charged???

    • Default Gravatar
      NikkiJuly 11, 2018

      Hi Traveller,

      Thanks for getting in touch!

      Sorry for the confusion. If you have a positive credit card balance and you intend to use your money put into it, there will be no cash advanced interest rate charged. However, there will still be a charge on cash advance fees and ATM withdrawal fee (ATM operator fee).

      Hope this clarifies!

      Regards,
      Nikki

  5. Default Gravatar
    BrianApril 22, 2018

    If I had say a Bankwest or 28 Deg card and wanted say to purchase, whist in Australia, a cruise costing several thousand $US dollars with an overseas company using that card would I be charged a conversion and/ or an overseas transaction fee?

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      JeniApril 22, 2018Staff

      Hi Brian,

      Thank you for getting in touch with finder.

      For the Latitude 28 Degrees Platinum Mastercard, there’s 0% of transaction value under the foreign currency conversion fee.

      If you have a Bankwest Zero Mastercard, then you will be charged 2.95% of transaction value as the foreign currency conversion fee. However if you have a Bankwest Zero Platinum Mastercard then NO foreign transaction fee.

      As a friendly reminder, while we do not represent any company we feature on our pages, we can offer you general advice.

      I suggest that you also verify this info with your bank/credit card issuer before you make your dollar transaction.

      I hope this helps.

      Have a great day!

      Cheers,
      Jeni

  6. Default Gravatar
    JohnnyAugust 4, 2017

    I want a credit card for an overseas trip. Points on velocity would be great, as would no international currency transfer fees.
    Any suggestions, please? I’ve never had a credit card, just debit cards.

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      RenchAugust 4, 2017Staff

      Hi Johnny,

      Thanks for your inquiry.

      You can also have a look on this page for more options that you can compare. These are for Frequent Flyer Credit Cards with No Foreign Transaction Fees.

      Cheers,
      Rench

  7. Default Gravatar
    redMay 12, 2017

    Hi there,

    Im travelling to Ireland and the UK for three weeks and would like a small amount credit card just in case i need more funds.

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      HaroldMay 12, 2017Staff

      Hi Ladasedlar,

      Thank you for your inquiry.

      If you are abut to travel overseas you may want to consider the following options.
      1. Travel Money Guide: Ireland
      2. Travel Money Guide: UK

      I hope this information has helped.

      Cheers,
      Harold

  8. Default Gravatar
    AlleyApril 28, 2017

    I have a NZ kiwibank visa debit card, and I’ve been using it to withdraw money from da Commonwealth ATM in Australia where I am now residing. The fees are extremely high. Can u please which ATM in Australia day either hve a free foreign ATM fee or lesser fees?

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      HaroldApril 28, 2017Staff

      Hi Alley,

      Thank you for your inquiry.

      While ATMs are convenient, they can also be an expensive way to access cash. With your current circumstance you may find this option helpful.

      I hope this information has helped.

      Cheers,
      Harold

  9. Default Gravatar
    YongJanuary 13, 2017

    Is there a ATM withdrawal fee for 28 Degrees MasterCard from an ATM in the US? Can I withdraw from any ATMs in US? Thanks.

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      JasonJanuary 13, 2017Staff

      Hi Yong,

      Thank you for your enquiry.

      There’s no ATM withdrawal fee with 28 Degrees MasterCard when used with ATMs with the MasterCard logo anywhere in the world. Please note though that there would be a cash advance fee of $4 or 3% of the cash advance (whichever is greater) when you withdraw cash from an ATM with this card. Please click this link for more information about 28 Degrees MasterCard.

      Kind regards,
      Jason

  10. Default Gravatar
    narelleJanuary 12, 2017

    I am tossing up between Bankwest and 28 degrees both have some good and bad reviews. Does the Bankwest charge the payment fee that everyone seems to be complaining about 95c to make a payment?

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      MayJanuary 12, 2017Staff

      Hi Narelle,

      Thanks for your question.

      No, Bankwest does not charge you a fee when making payments for your credit cards bills.

      Cheers,
      May

Credit Cards Comparison

Data indicated here is updated regularly
Name Product Purchase rate (p.a.) Balance transfer rate Annual fee
HSBC Platinum Credit Card - Balance Transfer Offer
19.99% p.a.
0% p.a. for 22 months
$129 p.a.
Save with a 22-month balance transfer offer. Plus, lounge passes, travel insurance and an annual fee refund when you spend an eligible $6k/year.
ANZ Low Rate
12.49% p.a.
0% p.a. for 22 months with 1.5% balance transfer fee
$0 p.a. annual fee for the first year ($58 p.a. thereafter)
Save with 0% p.a on balance transfers for 22 months (with a 1.5% BT fee) and $0 first year annual fee. Plus a 12.49% p.a. purchase interest rate.
Bankwest Zero Platinum Mastercard
17.99% p.a.
2.99% p.a. for 9 months
$0 p.a.
Offers a $0 annual fee, 0% foreign transaction fees, complimentary international travel insurance and a balance transfer offer.
ANZ Frequent Flyer Black
20.24% p.a.
20.24% p.a.
$425 p.a.
Earn 100,000 bonus Qantas Points, 75 bonus Status Credits and $150 back when you spend $3,000 in the first 3 months with this premium card.
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* The credit card offers compared on this page are chosen from a range of credit cards finder.com.au has access to track details from and is not representative of all the products available in the market. Products are displayed in no particular order or ranking. The use of terms 'Best' and 'Top' are not product ratings and are subject to our disclaimer. You should consider seeking independent financial advice and consider your own personal financial circumstances when comparing cards.

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