Exercise Right Week health event

Exercise Right Week

This health event is aimed at encouraging all Australians to start undertaking a regular exercise regime for the sake of their health.

More than 9.5 million Australian adults are either inactive or are not doing enough daily exercise. This trend is being carried through to our younger generations, with 9 out of 10 teenagers also not active enough.

Regular exercise (the Department of Health recommends at least 60 minutes per day) can reduce the risk of certain types of cancers, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and depression and has also been found to improve concentration and enhance self-esteem. Something as simple as riding your bike to work or taking the stairs instead of using the lift can make a big difference.

What is Exercise Right Week?

Exercise Right Week is held in May each year by Exercise & Sports Science Australia (ESSA), the country’s peak professional body for exercise and sports science. During the week, ESSA encourages exercise and sports science practitioners everywhere to hold events that promote exercising right. The start date for 2017 is May 22.

According to ESSA, exercising right is not just about being active, but about doing the right kind of exercise for your health and level of fitness. During Exercise Right Week, ESSA assists exercise science practitioners in holding a number of events aimed at encouraging Australians to not only exercise, but to exercise right.

What's happening in 2017?

The theme of Exercise Right Week this year is 'Who's your match? - Getting to know your expert of exercise'. It's aim is to make Australians aware of how important it is to choose the right fitness trainer for their needs, breakdown stereotypes around exercise experts and shine a spotlight on the good work done by Accredited Exercise Physiologists, Accredited Exercise Scientists and Accredited Sports Scientists.

How can you get involved?

Exercise and sports science practitioners who wish to participate in Exercise Right Week are encouraged by ESSA to hold an event of some kind, which could include any of the following:

  • A family fun run, with different goals for each participant’s level of fitness.
  • An Open Day at your exercise or sports science clinic where people can have their fitness needs assessed for free.
  • A free community exercise session such as aerobics or Zumba.
  • An exhibit stand or stall at your local shopping centre, market or fair.
  • A visit to a school or hospital to explain exercising right and give practical demonstrations.

How do I sign up?

Members of the general public who want to participate in Exercise Right Week can do any of the following to get involved:

  • Visit your GP and ask for a referral to an appropriate exercise or sports science practitioner.
  • Attend a free Open Day at a sports science clinic.
  • Make a commitment to start exercising every day and follow through with it. A survey conducted by ESSA found that while 77% of respondents had signed up for an online exercise program, only 40% of them actually completed it.

Previous May event: Palliative Care Week | Back to Health Event Hub | Next May event: World Thyroid Day

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Don Gribble

Don is a creative writer with extensive experience writing scripts, blogs, web content and ebooks. He enjoys writing because it allows him to know a little bit about a lot of subjects and to continue learning new things every day.

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