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Coronavirus statistics Australia

All the figures on the Australian and global progress of COVID-19.

Updated

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We’re committed to our readers and editorial independence. We don’t compare all products in the market and may receive compensation when we refer you to our partners, but this does not influence our opinions or reviews. Learn more about Finder.

The COVID-19 coronavirus is a rapidly spreading pandemic. This means that the data on total number of infections is constantly changing. Our COVID-19 stats page is designed to keep you up to date with the latest figures, including a breakdown of deaths and infections in each country. To learn more about how to manage the impact of COVID-19 on your life and finances, head to our coronavirus information hub.

Please note: The figures below are taken from a variety of public sources that are not always consistent. Please check the individual attribution notes if you want further information around how specific data is collected.
This data was last updated on 2020-10-29 at 08:00 CEST and was sourced from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

44,574,981

Current confirmed cases

(+479,707 in last 24 hours)

1,175,279

Total deaths

(+6,914 in last 24 hours)

Growth in COVID-19 cases by country

ASX stock market coronavirus tracker

The impact of Coronavirus on the Australin economy and the stock market has been huge. The market crashed from highs over 7,000 to a low of near 4,500 in a matter of days. Our tracker above charts the value of the ASX each day, along with major events in Australia's COVID-19 story.

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Public perception of recession likelihood

The chart above depicts the percentage of Australians who responded 'likely' or 'very likely' when asked how likely Australia was to experiences a recession in the next 12 month. As you can see, the public perception of recession has shifted significantly in the last two months due to the economic impact of COVID-19.

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Sharp increase in email phishing scams

There has been a dramatic jump in the number of email scams reported in Australia since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, with 1031 incidents of phishing reported to ScamWatch - the first time the monthly figure has been above 1,000. For more, check out our article on common coronavirus scams and how to identify an email phishing scam.

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Drop in positive sentiment in the property market

With social distancing regulations forcing estate agents to show houses by appointment only, and auctions forced online, the Australian property market is facing a challenging period. Our Consumer Sentiment Tracker has seen a significant drop in confidence in April, with only 42% of Aussies saying now is a good time to buy a home.

When will everything be back to normal?

While some countries are seeing their COVID-19 cases increasing exponentially, others such as Australia are seeing numbers decline daily. With the current growth rate in Australia at less than 100 cases per day, it may seem like we're nearing the end of the danger. However, this is not the case. Allowing life to get back to normal would allow the few cases of COVID-19 which are still in the community spread like wildfire - we'd be back to where we started. One of two things likely needs to happen before the lock-downs can be lifted:

  • Herd immunity
  • Coronavirus vaccine

If anything over 60 percent of the population move into the "cured" category, the spread of the virus will be significantly slowed down. It will be as if 60% of the population is still in social isolation. However, this will likely take a long time, especially with social distancing in place. It will also result in a large number of deaths among vulnerable groups.

A vaccine would be the ultimate solution, and there are several in development in multiple countries. Once a potential vaccine is found, however, it needs to go through rigorous clinical trials. This, also, could take a long time. The earliest estimates are for a vaccine to hit the market by the end of the year, but it could take two years or more. Not only that - once a safe vaccine is found it will need to be manufactured and delivered to millions of people around the world before the public can be let back into bars and restaurants. We are, in other words, in this for the long haul.

Cumulative and total cases and deaths by country including Australia

The charts below depict the total number of new COVID-19 cases per week for every country, as reported Sunday. In each case, "Week 1" is the first week in which a case is registered. The number of weeks charted reflects how long Coronavirus has been present in each country. Similarly, the charts monitoring mortalities begin when the first death is reported.

New South Wales (NSW) Case Breakdown

Victoria (VIC) Cumulative Cases

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Queensland (QLD) Cumulative Cases

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South Australia (SA) Cumulative Cases

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West Australia (WA) Cumulative Cases

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Tasmania (TAS) Cumulative Cases

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ACT Cumulative Cases

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Search cases in Australia by Local Government Area

Search global cases by country

Type a country in the search bar below and use the button to see the latest coronavirus statistics.

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