Cordless phone buying guide: How to choose the best phone for your home

Compare phones from Panasonic, Uniden, AT&T and more.

Mobile phones have replaced the good old-fashioned landline for many of us, but there are still some key reasons why a cordless phone can be a useful addition to your home. Not only do cordless phones offer better sound quality than the average smartphone, but their dependable coverage means you don't have to worry about reception dropping out halfway through a call.

Cordless phone prices range from around $30 to $200 for most models, but the features available can vary substantially depending on the price point you choose. Our guide will lead you through the key inclusions and specs you need to consider and help you find the best cordless phone for your home and budget.

Compare some of the best cordless phones

Data obtained January 2019. Prices are subject to change and should be used only as a general guide.
Name Product Average Price (AUD) Total phonebook Caller ID history Call block Expandability Purchase today
Panasonic KX-TGC350B
Panasonic KX-TGC350B
$42.05
50
50
Yes
Up to 6 handsets
The Panasonic KX-TGC350B has low power consumption and displays ringer IDs.
Uniden XDECT 8315
Uniden XDECT 8315
$69
6000
50
Yes
Up to 12 handsets
The Uniden XDECT 8315 offers Bluetooth pairing with up to four mobiles and includes a built-in USB charger.
Oricom PRO610-1
Oricom PRO610-1
$69
50
30
No
No
The Oricom PRO610-1 is hearing-aid compatible and offers an extra loud ringer.
VTech CS6529-4B
VTech CS6529-4B
$70.13
50
50
No
Up to 5 handsets
The VTech CS6529-4B comes with four handsets and a wall mounted bracket.
Telstra Call Guardian 301
Telstra Call Guardian 301
$75
200
20
Yes
Up to 2 Handsets
You can buy or rent Telstra's Call Guardian 301 and block nuisance calls.
Panasonic KX-TGD323ALB
Panasonic KX-TGD323ALB
$99.95
120
50
Yes
Up to 6 Handsets
Panasonic's KX-TGD323ALB phone can be used as a baby monitor and still works during a power outage.
Oricom PRO910-1
Oricom PRO910-1
$168
50
30
No
No
The Oricom PRO910-1 is designed for seniors and has a visual ring indicator.
Uniden SS E35
Uniden SS E35
$169.89
200
50
Yes
Yes
The Uniden SS E35 has a slow playback option, a do-not-disturb function and is splash-proof
AT&T CRL32102
AT&T CRL32102
$245.24
50
50
No
Up to 12 handsets
The AT&T CRL32102 has an extra large display and is expandable up to twelve sets.
AT&T CL84102
AT&T CL84102
$539.79
50
50
No
Up to 12 handsets
The AT&T CL84102 is a set of one corded and one cordless phone.

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Why should I consider a cordless phone?

There are a few key reasons why you might consider buying a cordless phone system for your home:

  • You want better sound quality. Landlines typically produce better sound quality than mobile phones, which can be an especially important feature if you're hard of hearing.
  • You want reliable coverage. If your home is a mobile black spot or you have problems with patchy mobile coverage, cordless phones combine the reliability of a fixed line with the freedom of movement provided by a mobile.
  • You don't have (or want) a mobile. If you don't have any desire to ever get a mobile phone, a cordless system is a practical and affordable alternative.
  • You want to save money. If you're already paying for a phone line for your Internet connection, getting a cordless phone can make good sense. By bundling your home phone together with your broadband Internet costs, you could potentially get good value for money.

Who should not consider a cordless phone

Take a moment to think about all the phone calls you've made and received over the past month or so. If the vast majority of them were on your mobile, it might be time to consider doing away with your landline altogether.

With most mobile phone providers offering plans with unlimited calls and text at prices similar to (or sometimes less than) landline rental fees, a cordless phone may simply be an unnecessary expense. In fact, finder.com.au research has shown that home phones may become extinct by 2037.

Another reason to consider ditching your landline may be if you're switching over to the NBN. Once you've completed the switch, your home phone will become a VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) service, which means your phone will go down whenever there's an Internet outage. Despite this, our research shows that 64% of NBN users decide to keep their landlines.

And if you've been holding onto your landline to contact friends or relatives overseas, smartphone apps like Skype and WhatsApp make this even cheaper and easier.

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What types are available?

There are plenty of choice available when shopping for a cordless phone, with models from Panasonic, Telstra, Uniden, AT&T, VTech and a host of other brands.

Apart from their price points, one key way to distinguish between different models is to check whether they feature a built-in digital answering machine. Models with answering machines tend to boast a wide range of features and sit towards the top end of the price range.

Another factor to consider is whether the cordless system has a corded base unit, or whether all handsets provided are cordless.

How to compare cordless phones

When choosing a cordless phone, you'll need to consider the features you want in your landline, such as the number of handsets and the size of its phonebook as well as the amount of money you want to spend. Use the following items as a checklist when comparing cordless phones and their features:

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Which cordless phone is best for me?

The right cordless phone for you will depend on a few important factors including your budget, the number of handsets you need and the tech features you want. To help make this process easier, we've compared the pros and cons of five popular cordless phones in the table below:

The goodThe bad
VTech CS6719
  • Affordable
  • Easy to set up and use
  • No answering machine
  • Lacks the advanced features of some other models
AT&T CL84102
  • Built-in answering machine
  • Can support 12 handsets
  • Some negative user reviews
  • No call-block feature
Panasonic KX-TGD532W
  • Reasonably priced
  • Great range
  • Disappointing sound quality
  • Lacks some advanced features
Oricom PRO910-1
  • Amplified sound and large buttons
  • Designed for seniors
  • Expensive
  • Can't be expanded with additional handsets
Uniden SS E35
  • Phone for those with vision- and hearing-impairment
  • Features an optional emergency alert pendant
  • Poor range
  • Some negative user reviews

Bundling your home phone and Internet

If you've decided that a cordless phone is right for you, you may also want to consider your home phone plan options. Those that don't have an Internet connection will need to look for a standalone home phone plan, but if you want both Internet and a home phone, then you should consider bundling your two plans together.

If you keep your Internet and home phone plans separate, you may end up paying more than you need to. With this in mind, it's worth shopping around to find a home phone and Internet bundle that offers good value for money.

While a smartphone may be all that some people need, cordless phones do offer some important benefits.


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