Change of Duties Notice templates (Australia)

Make sure you abide by the law when changing an employees’ role with a change of duties notice template.

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Are you changing the duties and responsibilities of an employee? Under the Job Keepers Fair Work Act (2009), an employer must provide an employee with a change of duties notice two weeks before any changes taking effect to their job role. We have created a simple template guide to help you draft the necessary letter.

What is a Change of Duties Notice?

A Change of Duties Notice is presented to an employee two weeks before adding to or changing a role description or duties laid out in the employee's contract or job description. The notice outlines all needed directions regarding the new duties. It also says if the changed role comes with a different pay.

Change of duties notice

Download this template at Lawpath

When should I use a Change of Duties Notice?

Employees need to have a clear description of their role so that they understand what is expected of them. If something in their role changes, they also need to understand their new duties. This is when you provide a Change if Duties Notice. It legally has to be given two weeks before the changes come into effect.

What does a Change of Duties Notice include and not include?

A Change of Duties Notice outlines any changes that will take effect (along with the date that effects are to start) and an explanation of the employee's new role. Here is exactly what it does and does not include:

Included:

A Change of Duties Notice should include:

  • Recipient's name, phone number, and address
  • Current job description and role
  • Explain why the job role is changing
  • Whether the level of responsibility increase or decrease
  • An outline of the new changes of the duties and responsibilities
  • Date the new duties are to take effect
  • Reason(s) why the job description is being changed
  • Any changes in pay or pay dates
  • Who to contact with any questions

Not included:

A Change of Duties Notice should not include:

  • Description of the employee's prior job role (the past does not matter)
  • Making it personal
  • Language that eludes to frustration
  • Profanity
  • Sarcasm
  • Threats
  • Ultimatums

How effective is a Change of Duties Notice?

Change is inevitable, especially in business. Job roles are constantly changing and upgrading for a variety of reasons. One of the best ways to deal with this is to provide an employee with a Change of Duties notice. This clearly outlines their new job description and when the changes must take effect. A Change of Duties Notice takes the guessing out of things, so an employee has a noticeably clear idea of their new job role.

Do I need a lawyer for the Change of Duties Notice?

You do not need a lawyer to draft a Change of Duties Notice. In fact, you can use a free template to quickly and effectively create the document. If you would like to a lawyer to consult on your document, compare online services below.

Name Product What's offered? Starting price to become a member Annual Fee from Free legal documents available?
Lawpath
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$79 per month
Essentials: $288, legal advice: $828
You can view samples for free and you can create your first document for free.
Choose an annual plan from just $288 and get unlimited revisions to your legal or business documents. Plus, unlock exclusive partner offers.
LawDepot
Legal documents and templates, Legal guides
$4.99 per month
$59.88
Free one week trial available which gives access to hundreds of documents.
Customise and download legal documents in as little as five minutes. Plus, LawDepot offers peace of mind with two service guarantees.
Legal123
Legal documents and templates, Legal guides
Varies per template
N/A
No
Legal123 offers a range of individual templates or document packages for consultants, app developers, personal trainers and more.
LegalVision
Legal documents and templates, Legal guides, Legal advice
$49 + GST per week
$2,548 + GST
No
Your business can take advantage of unlimited lawyer consultations, fast turnaround times and free legal templates with LegalVision.
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How do I write a Change of Duties Notice?

  1. Write using a standard business format. Include the company's name, address, phone number, and date.
  2. Address the letter to the employee
  3. State the reason why the employee must change duties such as downsizing, downturn, or some other change in the business's structure.
  4. Outline the employee's new duties
  5. Explain the new duties and any requirements that the employee must meet to perform the new tasks.
  6. State that the change of duties will take effect 14 days from the date of the Change of Duties Notice
  7. List any changes in pay that the employee might experience because of altered job tasks.
  8. Direct the employee to who they should contact concerning any questions or concerns. Provide all contact information such as names, phone numbers, and addresses to who the employee can reach out for further information.
  9. Use a professional sign-off such as 'thank you', 'sincerely', or 'regards'.
  10. Type out your name and job title.
  11. Sign and date the letter in ink using your signature.
  • Lawpath offers free sample template. However, to customise, you must create an account and sign up online.

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