Bitcoin and cryptocurrency round-up: 19 March 2018

Posted: 19 March 2018 6:56 pm
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What's happening in cryptocurrency today?

Read about crypto's asymmetrical advantage, the G20 results, the case for $91,000 bitcoin, Visa's awkward crypto attack and our weekly price analyses.



1. Every time God closes a door, s/he busts out an entire wall.

Asymmetrical outcomes, where one big win can easily pay for a dozen total losses, are drawing more institutional traders to cryptocurrency, Pantera Capital says.

In an appropriately diverse crypto market, not cutting off a few slices eventually becomes the statistically riskier option.

2. G news.

Markets might be cautiously bouncing back following positive-ish outcomes from the G20 FSB meeting.

Or they might be bouncing back for entirely unrelated reasons.

3. More pain, more gain.

When bitcoin seemed to be going well, the analysis said $55,000 bitcoin by 2022. Now that the prices have plunged, the model says $91,000 bitcoin by 2020.

4. Competing for the lucrative criminal demographic.

By all estimates, prepaid cards for criminals are a multi-billion dollar business.

In context, the Visa CFO's railings against cryptocurrency are both explicable and kind of awkward.

5. Weekly price analyses: Rollcall edition.

  • Bitcoin is present and looking sharp, but arrived late.
  • Ethereum has taken ill.
  • Ripple was hit by a bus.
  • Litecoin was marked present, but asked to be excused later in the week.

6. FintruX problems and solutions


Disclosure: At the time of writing the author holds ETH, IOTA, ICX, VEN, XLM, BTC and NANO.

Disclaimer: This information should not be interpreted as an endorsement of cryptocurrency or any specific provider, service or offering. It is not a recommendation to trade. Cryptocurrencies are speculative, complex and involve significant risks – they are highly volatile and sensitive to secondary activity. Performance is unpredictable and past performance is no guarantee of future performance. Consider your own circumstances, and obtain your own advice, before relying on this information. You should also verify the nature of any product or service (including its legal status and relevant regulatory requirements) and consult the relevant Regulators' websites before making any decision. Finder, or the author, may have holdings in the cryptocurrencies discussed.

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