Best DSLR and mirrorless cameras in Australia

Whether you're looking for a cheap and cheerful camera or something a little beefier, we've found the best DSLR and mirrorless cameras you can buy to take your media making to the next level.

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The best DSLR and mirrorless cameras in Australia

How did we pick this list?

Finder's team checked out dozens of DSLR and mirrorless cameras to pick out the best ones for anyone from experienced photographers to vloggers. We dug into the details of each model, looking at everything from customer reviews to specifications to figure out which options were most suited to each category.

Read more detail on our methodology below.

Canon EOS 6D Mark II

Best overall DSLR camera

Canon EOS 6D Mark II
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Full-frame 26.2-megapixel sensor
  • Fantastic articulating touchscreen

Cons

  • Not terribly portable
  • Lacks 4K recording

Why we chose it

If you're looking for a new DSLR with a bit of punch, Canon's 6D Mark II should be high up on your list of options. The beast has a fantastic full-frame 26.2-megapixel sensor and vari-angle display, making it the best overall DSLR camera on the market.

The EOS 6D Mark II comes with a 26.2-megapixel full-frame sensor that's just about as capable as you can get on a modern DSLR. It also has 45 autofocus points for snappy focusing, but that number is somewhat small compared to similar mirrorless models.

Unlike Canon's top of the line 1DX Mark III, the 6D Mark II has an articulating display. That makes it simple for any work where you're in front of the camera or where you need to snap shots from difficult positions.

Video is not the 6D Mark II's strong suit. Unlike many other cameras in this price range, you don't get any 4K recording, and it's not even at a super-high frame rate either. You'll max out at 50 frames per second at 1080p, and you can't get more frames at a lower resolution.

Since this is a full-frame DSLR, it's not a light camera. Without any lenses or external accessories, the camera weighs around 765 grams. When you add on heavy (and expensive) full-frame Canon glass, you're looking at a set-up that weighs about a kilogram or more.

Those who've already got their hands on a 6D Mark II are pretty pleased with all it has to offer. The camera boasts a rating of 4.7 out of 5 from more than 2,300 reviews on Google, with buyers loving the camera's battery life and autofocusing capabilities. They weren't so impressed with its 6.5 frames per second of continuous shooting.


Canon EOS 1500D DSLR Camera with 18-55mm Lens

Best cheap DSLR camera

Canon EOS 1500D DSLR Camera with 18-55mm Lens
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Easy to use
  • Built-in flash

Cons

  • Slow continuous shooting
  • Outdated video capabilities

Why we chose it

If you're looking for an affordable way to get started with photography, Canon's 1500D is a great place to start. Thanks to its ease of use, included kit lenses and built-in flash, it's the best cheap DSLR camera you can buy.

Straight out of the box, the 1500D is a super easy camera to learn how to use. There are plenty of clearly labelled buttons, and you won't find any confusing dials on top of the camera. You can also clearly see whatever you're shooting through the viewfinder or on the 3-inch display. The one downside of the display? It doesn't fold out and can't be adjusted.

There's a built-in flash on the 1500D, so if you're in a pinch and need a little extra light in your shot, you can get it straight from the camera without repositioning or fiddling around with the camera's manual settings.

You shouldn't expect to be capturing many action shots with the 1500D since the camera can only shoot continuously at 3 frames per second. That gives you far fewer photos to play with when you take them off the camera for editing, viewing or posting. That won't be much of an issue if you're taking relatively still shots, though.

If you're looking for a camera to film on, you should look elsewhere. The 1500D's recording specs are what you'd expect from a similarly-priced camera from half a decade ago, only capable of 1080p at 30 frames per second. Your smartphone will almost definitely be a far better video capturing device than this camera.

Canon's entry-level 1500D earned an impressive rating of 4.7 out of 5 from 80 people on Google. Users were pleased with how easy the camera is to use, and many called it great value for money. People didn't have anything particularly negative to say about the camera.


Canon EOS 90D DSLR Camera

Best DSLR camera for video

Canon EOS 90D DSLR Camera
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Uncropped 4K recording
  • Vari-angle touchscreen display

Cons

  • Just one SD card slot
  • Limited recording time

Why we chose it

Canon's 90D is a fantastic hybrid camera capable of delivering phenomenal images and crisp video. With a vari-angle touchscreen all sorts of video-making is a breeze, and its ability to film in 4K without cropping makes the 90D the best DSLR camera for video.

If you're looking for something to take plenty of photos with, the 90D is one of the best options in the DSLR space. It's got a fantastic 32.5-megapixel APS-C sensor and can shoot continuously at up to 11 frames per second for when you're deep in the action.

While it's great for photos, the 90D comes into its own when recording. It's capable of uncropped 4K video at 30 frames per second. If you need a higher frame rate, you'll be able to capture up to 120 frames per second if you bump the resolution down to 1080p. When you're in front of the camera, the vari-angle touchscreen flips out so you can make sure you're lined up nicely in the frame.

Unfortunately, Canon limits your recording time per video to 29 minutes and 59 seconds. So, if you need to capture heaps of video at once, you'll either need to be ready to hit record again at the 30-minute mark or find a different camera. You might also find the single SD card slot to be a little limiting for lengthy filming sessions, but at least you can make use of the fastest (and most expensive) UHS-II cards on the 90D.

Customers hold the 90D in high regard, with the camera boasting a rating of 4.7 out of 5 from more than 1,200 reviews on Google. Many loved the camera's 11fps continuous shooting and image quality, but others weren't blown away by its autofocusing.


Nikon D5600 DSLR with AF-P DX 18-55mm VR Lens

Best DSLR camera for beginners

Nikon D5600 DSLR with AF-P DX 18-55mm VR Lens
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Great battery life
  • Comes with 2 lenses

Cons

  • Can't record in 4K
  • Sluggish 5fps shooting

Why we chose it

If you're just getting started with photography, learning about everything can be a bit overwhelming, but Nikon's D5600 makes it easy to get straight into things. With incredible battery life and 2 lenses included with the body, it's the best DSLR camera for beginners.

The D5600 has a relatively standard 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor that will do the trick for just about any sort of photography. It's also got a 3.2-inch flip-out display to help you see whatever you're shooting at basically any angle.

Nikon includes 2 lenses alongside the D5600, making it easy for beginners to get into things without having to invest in a few lenses. The smaller 18-55mm kit lens is a great starting point for wide-angle shooting and portraits, while the larger 70-300mm telephoto lens can get you closer to the action from afar.

With a fully charged battery and connectivity features turned off, you'll squeeze around 970 shots out of the D5600, which is leaps and bounds better than you'd get on a modern mirrorless camera.

While you can't expect everything from a more budget-centric camera, it would've been a nice touch if Nikon had included 4K recording capabilities on the D5600. Instead, you'll be limited to filming in 1080p at 60 frames per second.

Speaking of frames per second, you'll be able to continuously shoot stills at 5 frames per second, which is okay at this price point, but it's certainly not impressive.

D5600 users highly praised the camera, with Nikon's beginner model boasting a rating of 4.7 out of 5 from more than 4,000 reviews on Google. Buyers loved the camera's flip-out screen and called it a great value buy. Unfortunately, some had issues with its Bluetooth connectivity.


Nikon D780

Best DSLR camera for enthusiasts

Nikon D780
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Great video capabilities
  • Good ergonomic grip

Cons

  • Expensive price tag
  • Tap-to-track AF not as good as face detect

Why we chose it

Nikon has almost everything you could ask for in a DSLR camera wrapped up into one neat package, and it's called the D780. It's got a fantastic sensor and can be loaded with 2 SD cards at once, without a top of the line price tag, making it the best DSLR camera for enthusiasts.

First and foremost, the D780 comes equipped with a 24.5-megapixel full-frame sensor that will capture fantastic photos when looking through any number of the available Nikon F mount lenses. If you're more into your video, you can also record in 4K up to 30 frames per second. You'll be able to keep taking plenty of photos and videos, thanks to the camera's 2 SD card slots. They're also both UHS-II compatible, so even the fastest SD cards will work with the D780.

Unfortunately, DSLRs are having a hard time keeping up with the fantastic features available on mirrorless alternatives. The most noticeable thing missing here is in-body image stabilisation, or IBIS for short. It's not just Nikon who isn't giving DSLRs this tech. Canon even failed to include it on the highest-end DSLR in its arsenal. Where an IBIS-equipped camera would capture stable hand-held stills and video, the D780 relies on a steady hand (or tripod).

Another area where the D780 lags a bit behind its mirrorless counterparts is how many shots it can capture per second. You'll be able to get 7 frames per second out of the camera, but that's significantly less than the 10fps offered on the cheaper Sony A7 III and half the 14fps on Nikon's Z6 II.

Nikon's D780 has plenty of fans, with the camera boasting an average rating of 4.8 out of 5 from more than 170 reviews on Google. Users appreciated the DSLR's noise handling and snappy autofocus capabilities, but others weren't impressed with its price.


Canon EOS 1DX Mark III

Best DSLR camera for professionals

Canon EOS 1DX Mark III
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Snappy 16fps continuous shooting
  • Fantastic video capabilities for a DSLR

Cons

  • Lower sensor resolution than the competition
  • No vari-angle display

Why we chose it

If you're looking for the best of the best when it comes to DSLR cameras, look no further. Canon's 1DX Mark III sports phenomenally snappy shooting and can capture fantastic videos without breaking a sweat, making it the best DSLR camera for professionals that you can buy.

So, what makes the 1DX Mark III a pro-level body? Well, it's got fantastic connectivity options such as Wi-Fi and Ethernet, which makes it ideal for professionals who need to get their files to editors in an instant. You won't miss any of the action with up to 16 frames per second of continuous shooting. And, those dual CFexpress slots make it easy to keep capturing all of the crucial details throughout a long shoot, too.

For video, the 1DX Mark III will record in resolutions as high as 5.5K at a full 60 frames per second and can do 4K at 60fps without any cropping. Dialling the resolution back to 1080p allows for high frame rate shooting, 120fps to be precise.

While the 1DX Mark III has an impressive 20.1-megapixel full-frame sensor under the hood, it pales in resolution compared to much of the competition. It's pretty similar to the 20.8-megapixels of Nikon's D6, but Sony's equivalently-priced A1 has a whopping 50-megapixel sensor that can capture more versatile images.

Despite spending north of $10,000 on the 1DX Mark III, you don't get the privilege of a vari-angle display for more adaptable shooting. That might make it more challenging to see what sort of image you're capturing if you're holding the camera way above your head, while pros with Sony mirrorless tech, for instance, could tilt their displays down to get a better idea of the framing.

The 1DX Mark III has an incredibly high review score, bringing home a rating of 4.9 out of 5 from more than 50 reviews on Google. Users were thrilled with the camera's built-in wireless capabilities and said its image quality and noise handling were superb. Though some would argue that the time for spending this amount of money on a DSLR has passed, and it's time for mirrorless.


Sony A7 III

Best overall mirrorless camera

Sony A7 III
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Industry-leading value
  • Phenomenal autofocus system

Cons

  • Disappointing tiltable screen
  • Lower viewfinder resolution than competitors

Why we chose it

Mirrorless cameras have taken over the photography space, and Sony's offerings are among the best on the market. The A7 III is one of the best value cameras available today and boasts a remarkable full-frame sensor, 4K video and a cutting-edge autofocus system. When you look at all of that, it's easy to see why the A7 III is the best overall mirrorless camera you can buy.

The A7 III comes with a stellar 24.2-megapixel full-frame sensor capable of taking fantastic photos at up to 10 frames per second. For video, you can crank out 25 frames per second at a glorious 4K resolution.

Despite being the entry-level full-frame camera in Sony's line-up, the A7 III has ludicrously good autofocus, with 693 phase-detection autofocus points that can easily find and keep almost anything in focus. Sony's Eye AF makes it a breeze to take portraits and any other sort of shot with people. A new software update even adds Eye AF technology for animals, so you can always make sure your pets' eyes are tack sharp in your images.

You get all of that tech for a retail price of $2,279. That might seem like a lot, but when you look at how much competing cameras (like the Canon EOS R6) cost, it's impressive to see what Sony has been able to achieve.

The A7 III launched in 2018, and while it still holds up as far as image quality is concerned, it's ageing in other areas. Its electronic viewfinder is pretty weak when put up against the more recent competition and its touchscreen is also a little less crisp than on Sony's newer models. That screen won't flip out for easy shot framing either, but at least it can tilt up and down.

One of the highest-rated cameras on this list, the A7 is a fan favourite. It boasts a rating of 4.8 out of 5 from more than 4,000 reviews on Google, with customers praising the camera's fantastic value for money and its advanced tech like in-body image stabilisation. Several users complained about Sony's convoluted menu system.


Canon EOS M200

Best cheap mirrorless camera

Canon EOS M200
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Remarkably compact
  • 180-degree tiltable touchscreen

Cons

  • No viewfinder
  • Poor ergonomics

Why we chose it

The world of photography is full of pricey gear, but Canon's EOS M200 should work nicely for those on a budget. With a tiny footprint, included lenses and a tiltable touchscreen display, the M200 is the best cheap mirrorless camera you can buy.

You'll find a solid 24.1-megapixel APS-C sensor on the M200, capable of taking sharp photos right out of the box. The M200 is also great for budding videographers, with 4K recording capabilities at 24 frames per second.

The M200 is a seriously small camera, especially when you've got no lenses attached to it. At 10.8cm wide and 6.7cm tall, it's not too far from the size of an iPhone 12 mini. Its smartphone size makes it super easy to take around with you whenever you're out and about, even after you've attached a smaller lens.

Unfortunately, Canon sacrificed the inclusion of any ergonomic handles or grips in its quest for a compact camera. That might make shooting with the M200 for lengthy periods a little uncomfortable, but at least you won't be strained by its weight.

Again, since the M200 is so tiny, there's no space for a handy electronic viewfinder. You'll have to be happy with relying on the camera's 3-inch touchscreen to frame your shots, but at least it's a decent display. If you're into vlogging or taking selfies with something beefier than your smartphone, you can quickly flip up the screen to face you when you're in front of the camera.

Canon's cheap and cheerful M200 has plenty of positive reviews, earning an average rating of 4.6 out of 5 from 140 reviews on Google. Customers liked the camera's portability and ease of use but said autofocus could be a little slow at times.


Sony A7C

Best compact mirrorless camera

Sony A7C
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Super lightweight
  • Flip-out touch display

Cons

  • Tiny viewfinder
  • Limited physical controls

Why we chose it

If you're looking for a portable camera without compromising image quality, Sony has the perfect option for you. With a lightweight design and vari-angle display that makes it great for vlogging, the A7C is the best compact mirrorless camera on the market today.

The A7C is basically a slightly tweaked and smaller A7 III, which we picked as the best overall mirrorless camera on this list. The A7C comes with the same 24.2-megapixel full-frame sensor capable of shooting phenomenal photos at up to 10 frames per second, and 4K videos at 25fps. And to sweeten the deal, the A7C boasts updated autofocus technology over its older sibling.

Another area where the newer A7C reigns supreme over its sibling is its screen. While it's not the sharpest panel in the world, it flips out from the camera body and easily rotates up to 270 degrees. That lets you treat it as a monitor if you're recording yourself and can be adjusted to give you the best angle for shooting in challenging spots.

You'll barely even notice you're carrying around the A7C with you, as it weighs in at just 424 grams. While that number doesn't factor in any lens you might want to lug around, you can easily detach any glass from the camera body thanks to the interchangeable Sony E-mount. Since it's the same mount that Sony uses across its product line, you can use practically any lens you want, from minuscule prime lenses to telephoto monsters, on the tiny camera.

Keeping things compact introduces a few downsides. You've got no joystick or front dials for adjusting camera settings and choosing autofocus points. You also have to live with a criminally small electronic viewfinder, and to make things worse, it's offset to the left.

Customers awarded the Sony A7C with a rating of 4.6 out of 5 from more than 500 reviews on Google. Many praised the camera's autofocus capabilities and low light performance, but others took issue with the tiny EVF and lower-resolution screen.


Fujifilm X-T30

Best mirrorless camera for travel

Fujifilm X-T30
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Up to 20fps shooting
  • Easy to carry around

Cons

  • 4K recordings limited to 10 minutes
  • Limited screen adjustability

Why we chose it

Fujifilm might not be the first name you think of when you think of cameras, but there's no denying that it makes some fantastic models. With super-fast 20fps shooting and a compact form factor, the X-T30 is the best mirrorless camera you can buy for travel.

You won't miss any action if you're shooting with the X-T30 since you can snap up to 20 frames per second continuously without any cropping. If you can stomach losing some quality recorded by the 26.1-megapixel sensor, you could be super ambitious and get 30 frames per second with a 1.25x crop factor.

If having a lightweight camera is a must for you, the X-T30 is a perfect fit. Weighing in at just 383 grams (including the battery and memory card), it's one of the lightest options on this list. Of course, adding a lens into the mix will make it heavier, but it's still a whole 267 grams lighter than an A7 III.

The X-T30 has a 3-inch touchscreen display, but unlike some other Fujifilm cameras, you won't be able to flip it around to face you when you're behind the lens. At least you can adjust it slightly since you're able to pull it out from the camera body and tilt it up or down.

If you want to film all of your travels, the X-T30 isn't the camera for you. While it does record in 4K, you can only record 10 minutes at a time. Even if you film at 1080p, you still only get 15-minute long videos before having to click record again.

Fujifilm's compact X-T30 boasts a rating of 4.7 out of 5 from more than 270 reviews on Google. Users loved the camera's size and ease of use, though many mentioned that the quick menu button is prone to accidental presses.


Sony A7S III

Best mirrorless camera for video

Sony A7S III
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Advanced 4K 10-bit recording
  • Great low-light capabilities

Cons

  • Lower-resolution sensor isn't great for stills
  • Prohibitively expensive for many

Why we chose it

Sony knows a thing or two about videography, and its expertise shows in the A7S III. With a sensor specifically engineered for video, high-end 10-bit 4K recording and fantastic low-light potential, the A7S III is the best mirrorless camera you can get your hands on for anything video.

If you're a videographer, the A7S III is pretty much the best you can get before moving to a dedicated cinema camera like Sony's FX options. It boasts a video-optimised 12.1-megapixel full-frame sensor that can handle challenging low-light situations well and records 4K video at up to 100 frames per second.

The list of pro-level features doesn't end with high recording frame rates. You can film on the A7S III with a bit depth of 10 bits and with chroma subsampling at 4:2:2. The beefy camera also has a native ISO range that goes from 80 to 102,400, giving you heaps of flexibility to perfect your frame's lighting.

The A7S III's low megapixel count might be optimal for video, but you would be better off with higher resolution cameras like the Sony A7R IV or A1 if you want to use it for both videos and stills. That's particularly true if you need to crop your photos a bunch or want to keep lots of detail.

While all the A7S III's features sound great for videographers, it comes at an astronomical price. You'll need a cool $5,799 set aside to buy the A7S III at its retail price, so you're probably going to need it to be able to justify that expense.

The dream camera for many videographers has an incredibly high rating of 4.8 out of 5 from more than 400 reviews on Google. Buyers praised the camera's low-light capabilities for everything from astrophotography to videography, but others had some issues with Auto ISO.


Sony ZV-E10

Best mirrorless camera for vlogging

Sony ZV-E10
Image: Chris Stead/Finder

Finder Score:

★★★★★

Pros

  • Really nice, crisp stills and video looks ace in 4K
  • Slow-mo, quick-time, focus blur and panorama works well
  • Great on-board sound capture
  • Interchangeable lens on a vlogger camera

Cons

  • Kit lens isn’t wide enough to selfie at cropped video captures
  • Touchscreen is unresponsive and annoying
  • Lack of a viewfinder impacts still photography
  • Doesn’t behave well during movement

Why we chose it

If upping your vlogging game is at the top of your list of priorities, Sony's newly-released ZV-E10 is a fantastic option for you. With live streaming functionality, a compact body and the ability to use any of Sony's many E-mount lenses, the ZV-E10 is the best mirrorless camera you can buy for vlogging.

The ZV-E10 crams a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor into its tiny housing and can record at 25 frames per second in 4K. That might not be quite enough for those of you who demand 60fps recording, but if you prefer buttery smooth vlogging, you'll still be able to capture video at up to 100 frames per second if you drop the resolution to 1080p.

If you regularly stream, the ZV-E10 is the perfect companion for your live content. While the camera can't just automatically beam its feed straight to Twitch, it's not difficult to go live if you've got a computer on standby. Once you've dialled in your video settings on the camera, all you have to do is enable USB streaming in the menu and sync the camera with your software of choice. You can even buy a Sony accessory to keep the camera powered throughout lengthy streams.

Since this is a Sony camera with interchangeable lenses, you can use any lens on the E-mount. That gives you heaps more flexibility than the vast majority of vlogger-focused cameras and could let you experiment with the best focal length and aperture for your set-up rather than being locked in. Unfortunately, buying E-mount lenses is often a pricey ordeal. Sony's most basic lenses start at around $200, but you can expect to pay thousands for its high-end G Master glass. If you don't fancy paying G Master money, Sigma and Tamron have reputable options that often cost a couple hundred less than the native alternatives.

Unfortunately, since the ZV-E10 is so new, there's very little in the way of review scores available online. If you plan on investing in one of these Sony units, make sure you check for new reviews before hitting buy now.


Fujifilm X-T200 Mirrorless Digital Camera

Best mirrorless camera for beginners

Fujifilm X-T200 Mirrorless Digital Camera
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Large flip-out screen

Cons

  • On the expensive side
  • Has a plasticky feel

Why we chose it

If you're just getting started with photography, Fujifilm has a fantastic option for you. The X-T200 boasts a built-in electronic viewfinder and a massive touchscreen that makes it super easy to see what you're shooting, making it the best mirrorless camera for beginners.

Fujifilm loaded the X-T200 with plenty of tech for the price. It's got a 24.2-megapixel APS-C sensor, built-in Wi-Fi and a great electronic viewfinder that makes it easy to line up and take photos.

The touchscreen is where the X-T200 stands out from the pack. It's a 3.5-inch panel that feels quite roomy compared to the standard 3 or 3.2-inch displays you'll find on similar Sony and Canon models. You can also flip out and rotate the screen to your heart's content, perfect for taking photos or videos of yourself.

It's not all great, though. The X-T200 is one of the worst performers on this list as far as battery life is concerned, with the camera only able to take around 270 still images before running out of steam. At least there's an economy mode, which lets you take about 450 shots before you need to recharge.

If you're an aspiring videographer, you might find yourself getting a little frustrated with the 30-minute maximum recording time. It gets even worse if you're keen to record in 4K. Fujifilm limits that to just 15 minutes of continuous recording.

The X-T200 earned high praise from those who've used it, with more than 100 people awarding the camera an average rating on Google of 4.5 out of 5. Users loved the sharp and responsive touchscreen, but others warned that the camera isn't super customisable.


Sony Alpha A7R IV Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

Best mirrorless camera for enthusiasts

Sony Alpha A7R IV Full Frame Mirrorless Camera
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • 61-megapixel full-frame sensor
  • Fantastic, accurate autofocus

Cons

  • No 4K/60FPS recording
  • Gargantuan file sizes

Why we chose it

Sony's high-end mirrorless cameras are among the best in the business, and the A7R IV won't disappoint the enthusiast (or professional) with a big budget. With remarkable autofocus technology and a breath-taking 61-megapixel full-frame sensor, the A7R IV is the best mirrorless camera for enthusiasts.

If you desperately need a camera with an astronomical megapixel count, the A7R IV should be on your list of options. It's got a 61-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor that's perfect for cropping in without losing too much detail and for blowing up on a large scale.

Still, that many megapixels is overkill for the average media maker, and it means you'll need to make quite an investment in memory cards to store everything you shoot. Sony says you can keep just 62 uncompressed RAW files on an 8GB card before it's full. 64GB cards are still only capable of holding 500 photos, but at least the A7R IV has 2 UHS-II compliant SD card slots.

Like many of Sony's other mirrorless cameras, the autofocus on the A7R IV is industry-leading. With 567 phase-detection autofocus points, the A7R IV won't even break a sweat finding and locking onto whatever you're shooting.

Any video makers looking to use the A7R IV for their creations might be a little disappointed with the camera's lack of 60fps recording at 4K. If you need silky smooth, high-resolution video, the A7S III is probably the better pick.

Sony's A7R IV is an incredibly well-received body, with more than 500 people on Google awarding it with an average rating of 4.8 out of 5. Users were thrilled with its autofocus capabilities but were less pleased with the camera's battery life.


Sony A1

Best mirrorless camera for professionals

Sony A1
Image: Supplied/Finder

Not yet rated

Pros

  • Rapid 30fps continuous shooting
  • 50-megapixel full-frame sensor

Cons

  • Ludicrously pricey
  • Disappointing battery life

Why we chose it

While Canon and Nikon dominated the professional photography market for decades, the move to mirrorless has allowed Sony to make its mark. Equipped with an outstanding 50-megapixel full-frame sensor and stupidly fast 30fps continuous shooting capabilities, the Sony A1 is the best mirrorless camera for professionals.

Sony loaded the A1 up with all of its best tech, including a phenomenal 50-megapixel full-frame sensor. That's a slightly lower resolution than the A7R IV, but it's still more than enough to be incredible for cropping without losing too much detail. You'll never miss the action with the A1, either, with sports and action photographers hugely benefitting from the A1's 30 frames per second of continuous shooting.

The A1 isn't just for photographers, with pro-grade video available right out of the box. You'll be able to capture a cinematic 24 frames per second at 8K, and can record up to 100fps in 4K as well. There's no maximum recording time, and it supports 4:2:2 10-bit capture, too.

If you know you'll be taking the A1 out on lengthy shoots, you're going to want a battery grip or at least a few spares. You'll only squeeze about 430 shots out of the expensive body if you're using the viewfinder, which is pretty poor when you remember the more than ten-thousand-dollar asking price. That's also significantly fewer shots than the other high-end Sony cameras can crank out, with the A7R IV able to take an extra hundred photos between charges.

There's no doubt that the A1 represents the pinnacle of full-frame mirrorless shooting right now, but that comes at an exorbitant price. You'll need a cool $10,499 to buy this behemoth at its retail price. And that's not taking any lenses, accessories or memory cards into consideration.

Those with the guts to invest more than $10,000 into a camera seem to have been impressed with their purchase. The Sony A1 boasts an impressive rating of 4.7 out of 5 from more than 130 reviews on Google, with customers raving about the camera's high resolution and solid build quality. Some weren't as blown away by its battery life, though.


Amazon prices last updated on 26 January, 2022 at 03:12 am
eBay prices last updated on 25 January, 2022 at 08:07 pm

Methodology

7
Brands considered
70
Products compared
15
Best products chosen
  • We checked out 70 DSLR and mirrorless cameras available here in Australia to pick out the best options for you.
  • We selected these cameras based on their specifications and user reviews.
  • The products on this list are chosen by our editorial team and are not selected based on commercial relationships.

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