Barbecue Insurance

Spent money on a barbeque? Keep it safe with barbeque insurance.

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To ensure the money you've spent on your barbeque doesn't go to waste, you need to think about insurance. There are a few options available, including building insurance, contents insurance and single item insurance. We've broken down the options to make deciding easier.

What are my barbeque insurance options?

There are three main ways to get barbecue insurance:

  • Using building insurance. If your barbecue is built into your property or fixed to the ground, then you can get cover for it with your building insurance. Be sure to ask your insurer to include it in your policy though.
  • Using contents insurance. In most cases, your barbecue won't be secured to the ground, which means it will fall under contents insurance. Contents insurance covers damage due to fire, storm, flood, theft and a number of other risks. However, some contents-insurance providers don't cover items kept in external areas, so be sure to ask if you can get your barbecue insured before signing up to a policy. You can also check out the product disclosure statement (PDS) to see if external areas are excluded.
  • Speciality barbecue insurance. If you only want to insure your BBQ, or can't find insurance that will cover you, you might be able to get single item insurance cover.

Contents insurance can protect your barbecue - plus more

Name Product Do they cover laptops? Contents Temporarily Removed From Home Accidental Damage to Home or Belongings Theft
St. George Contents Insurance
Optional
15% off for your first year. Promo code: COVER
ANZ Contents Insurance
Optional
Optional
Westpac Contents Insurance
Optional
15% off for your first year. Promo code: COVER
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Does home insurance cover my barbeque?

Home insurance can cover your barbecue. Some policies exclude external areas from their policy, so be sure to find this out before you sign up. Otherwise, BBQs can be added to or included in your contents cover.

It's worth keeping in mind that there are sometimes two types of policies available:

  • Replacement value. This type of policy will only cover your possessions for their current market value. For example, while your barbecue might have been worth $3,000 when you first bought it, it will depreciate in value. If it's damaged or destroyed by an insured event and you make a claim, you'll only receive a benefit that reflects its current market value, which could be significantly less than its purchase price.
  • New for old. New-for-old policies cover the cost of replacing insured goods with new equivalent items. This means if your BBQ is damaged by an insured event, you'll get a new replacement.

What kind of damage will I be covered for?

Home insurance policies will cover personal possessions, such as your barbecue, against a wide range of events including the following:

  • Fire
  • Storm, hail and lightning
  • Theft
  • Vandalism or malicious damage
  • Riots
  • Explosion
  • Sudden impact
  • Accidental glass breakage
  • Accidental damage (sometimes this is only available as an optional extra)
  • Flood (sometimes this is only available as an optional extra)
  • Water from leaking pipes
  • Earthquakes

Home insurance policies will also cover you for fire damage to your building and contents caused by your barbecue. Brands usually also provide legal liability (if you are at fault for injuring someone or damaging someone's property), which means you'll also be covered for repairs if your barbecue damages or destroys someone else or their property.

Do I need to keep my barbeque locked away when not in use?

It's always a good idea to lock away your barbecue when it's not in use. If you don't have a place to store it indoors, lock it securely to something. Insurers are more likely to reject your claim if you don't securely lock it away when it's not in use. This is because there's a case to be made that you did not take reasonable care.

As long as you do this, submitting a claim should be the same as any other contents claim. If it has been stolen, you may have to provide evidence of forced entry.

Picture: GettyImages

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