6 odd job vacancies at Amazon Australia

Angus Kidman 11 July 2017

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Would you apply when the ad starts with "Do you consider yourself a little peculiar?"

Like winter, Amazon is coming to Australia. And while we'll be waiting a few more months for the Amazon effect to really kick in, the hiring frenzy has already begun, with positions popping up all over LinkedIn.

Obviously, Amazon is going to want a lot of warehouse workers, given that a key part of its strategy will actually be distributing goods for other retailers. But there are plenty of jobs you might consider even if you have zero forklift skills. Here are a few that I noticed.

Managing Editor

"Do you consider yourself a little peculiar? Are you looking for an opportunity to speak to customers? Do you have an insatiable thirst for knowledge?" I might actually qualify for this role, which essentially involves co-ordinating content to keep Kindle Fire customers happy. But my inner pedant wouldn't be happy with the fact that the ad spells "utilise" with a Z.

Country Development Manager

No, this doesn't involve taking 35mm pictures of Australian scenery and developing them. "This exciting role entails working with multiple Seller Recruitment teams worldwide and focus on driving best-in class customer/ seller experience, helping existing sellers expand their business on the Amazon platform in Australia." Again, Amazon isn't just looking to sell stuff itself. Weirdest phrase in this ad? You must "be comfortable with ambiguity".

Head of Digital Music, Australia

The main point of interest with this role is that it proves that music will be part of the Amazon Prime offering down under real soon now. " You will work with the Amazon Music team and local in-region Amazon teams to develop a world-class and locally relevant digital music customer experience, and ensure that Amazon is well positioned versus other offerings." In other words: try and stop Amazon Music being totally pwned by Spotify.

Manager - Network Implementation

Amazon Web Services, aka all of Amazon's cloud stuff for other companies to use, is one of the two core product areas (alongside ebooks) where Amazon already has a major Australian presence. This job involves managing a team of engineers to build new services and make sure nothing crashes. The latter is harder than the former.

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Regional Facilities Manager

You might think this is forklifts again, but it's actually about managing the local head office in Sydney. Key requirements include "balancing frugality with creativity", which I broadly take to mean "we don't want to overpay for rent".

Senior Recruiter - Lead

With all this hiring going on, it's no surprise that Amazon also needs local recruitment gurus. But fair warning: you'll need a high tolerance for corporate jargon. This execrable sentence features in the ad: "Are you a process oriented data driven recruiting leader that loves to dive deep to fix complex operational challenges allowing for greater scalability and global impact?" Again, my inner pedant notes that "process-oriented" and "data-driven" should have hyphens here.


Whoever gets hired, I can't wait for Amazon to properly launch. My credit card may be less happy with the news.

Angus Kidman's Findings column looks at new developments and research that help you save money, make wise decisions and enjoy your life more. It appears Monday through Friday on finder.com.au.

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