Nissan X-Trail Review

Nissan X-Trail
Finder.com.au is personal finance comparison site that provides you with the tools you need to make better decisions. Learn how we work and how we make money.

finder score: 76.25%

Avg. critics score: 76.25%
4 critics
How did we calculate this?
We analysed and aggregated the scores of Cars Guide, WhichCar, CarAdvice and Motoring to bring you the finder score. This is a comprehensive score that brings together the four different expert ratings you see below.
Finder.com.au is personal finance comparison site that provides you with the tools you need to make better decisions. Learn how we work and how we make money.

Critic reviews

WebsiteRatingNotable quotes
Cars Guide69%"It might not be an X-Trail blazer, but this nip-and-tuck has added some critical technology and safety extras to an already competent package."Read more
"It might not be an X-Trail blazer, but this nip-and-tuck has added some critical technology and safety extras to an already competent package." Read more
Motoring76%"Undercutting its main rivals at the entry level, the X-TRAIL starts with value on its side, but things level as you progress through the model grades."Read more
"Undercutting its main rivals at the entry level, the X-TRAIL starts with value on its side, but things level as you progress through the model grades." Read more
WhichCar80%"Nissan has made auto-braking standard on the popular X-Trail, while freshening its roomy cabin and retaining the option of seven seats."Read more
"Nissan has made auto-braking standard on the popular X-Trail, while freshening its roomy cabin and retaining the option of seven seats." Read more
Car Advice80%"As an overall package, the X-Trail retains the attributes that make it a favourite amongst family buyers – it's comfortable, affordable, and spacious to boot..."Read more
"As an overall package, the X-Trail retains the attributes that make it a favourite amongst family buyers – it's comfortable, affordable, and spacious to boot..." Read more

How does the Nissan X-Trail compare with its peers?

SeatsBoot SpaceANCAP RatingPrice (from)Finder Score

Mazda CX-5
7442L5-Stars$28,69083.25%

Hyundai Tucson
5488L5-Stars$28,59079%

Nissan X-Trail
7565L5-Stars$27,99076.25%

Toyota RAV4
5577L5-Stars$28,55076.33%

Kia Sportage
5466L5-Stars$28,99079.50%

Mitsubishi Outlander
7477L5-Stars$28,75073.75%

The complete Nissan X-Trail review

Nissan X-Trail pricing and overview

Is this car for you?

Nissan refers to its X-Trail as the "Swiss Army knife of our range – the one-size-fits-all, family-proof car".

When you look at the features and options, you can see why.

One of the most notable features for 2017 is the option for 7 seats at a very attractive price point. If that’s one of your must-haves, then the X-Trail almost certainly belongs on your shortlist.

Nissan X-Trail 2017 variants

Prices indicate the manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP).

ModelPrice range
ST$27,990 - $33,980
TS (diesel)$35,380 - $35,680
ST-L$36,590 - $39,490
Ti$44,290 - $45,190
TL (diesel)$46,280 - $47,290

The range is divided neatly into two price groups. Within each, you can choose from a variety of engine and drivetrain options. For the most part, there’s little difference in actual driving performance between the ST/TS/ST-L and the Ti/TL.

The X-Trail was upgraded in 2017

Like other family-friendly SUVs, the X-Trail been largely geared towards city driving and light off-road duties. This popular range saw an upgrade in 2017, with a general freshening up of appearance, the addition of several useful technology features, and a diesel variant.

Prices for the 2017 version are the same across the board as previous models, or lower.

Engine and performance

Model2L petrol engine, 2WD, 6 speed manual transmission2.5L petrol engine 2WD2.5L petrol engine 4WD2L turbo-diesel engine
Power106 kW at 6,000 rpm126 kW at 6,000 rpm126 kW at 6,000 rpm130 kW at 3,750 rpm
Torque200 Nm at 4,400 rpm226 Nm at 4,400 rpm226 Nm at 4,400 rpm380 Nm at 2,000 rpm
STdonedonedoneclear
TSclearclearcleardone
ST-Lcleardonedoneclear
Ticlearcleardoneclear
TLclearclearcleardone
  • 2L petrol engine 2WD with 6-speed manual transmission: It’s hard to imagine this being a good choice. Available only with the ST, selecting these options knocks about $3,000 off the price but locks you into a weaker engine, 2WD drive and manual transmission.
  • 2.5L petrol engine 2WD: The standard, well-regarded choice of petrol engine. This is the only engine type available with 7-seater variants.
  • 2L turbo-diesel engine: The only diesel engine option

Nissan’s Xtronic CVT comes as standard with all versions, except the 2L petrol.

What’s a CVT – and do I really need to know what it is?

CVT stands for continuously variable transmission. You don’t really need to know what it is. You’ll be able to feel it in the test drive even without giving it a name.

Some reviewers found the X-Trail’s CVT to be oversensitive, resulting in a somewhat jerky and uneven drive. Others characterised it as responsive, offering the car a light and “peppy” feeling.

If you notice either of those on the test drive, that’s probably the CVT in action.

If an automatic transmission is the next step up from manual, then a CVT is the next step beyond that. It switches gears on the fly quicker than a non-CVT transmission.

It’s helpful because it offers improved fuel efficiency and a nimbler drive.

Some enthusiasts aren’t keen on it, just as some people simply prefer driving manual rather than automatic.

Expected fuel economy

Fuel consumption on the petrol engines is about on par with most other medium SUVs.

  • 2L petrol – Rated at 8.2L/100km
  • 2.5L petrol 2WD – Rated at 7.9 to 8.1L/100km, for the 5- and 7-seat versions.
  • 2.5L petrol 4WD – Rated at 8.3L/100km
  • 2L diesel – Rated at 6L and 6.1L/100km for the TS and the TL respectively

Fuel consumption and emissions are helped by a range of onboard systems, but there are two in particular you might notice, both of which are becoming relatively common across SUV models. You can turn either of them on or off at the press of a button:

  • Eco mode. Found in all CVT models (everything except the ST 2L petrol), this mode lets you improve fuel efficiency, but at the cost of performance. The main difference is that it smooths out and slows your acceleration so you’ll get more efficiency, but less responsiveness from the accelerator.
  • Idling stop. Found with the newer diesel variant only. With this mode on, your engine switches off after you’ve been stopped for about a second, and flicks back on in under half a second when you take off again. It only functions when the engine’s warmed up and you’ve been travelling at over 20km/h. It shouldn’t happen when you’re gradually moving through traffic or performing parking maneuvers.

Handling

Overall, reviewers found the X-Trail to be an especially lightweight and dynamic drive for its size, and some pointed out that the steering also seemed unusually light.

Combined with independent suspension that irons out all but the worst road bumps and an engine that delivers a constant stream of power (in the case of the 2.5L petrol at least), you’re looking at a very smooth ride and effortless drive, although the CVT might occasionally make itself felt.

As one reviewer noted, the car’s still willing to rev hard enough for “emphatic overtaking”, despite the light feeling. This is probably the case for all variants, except the manual 2L petrol 2WD.

The driving style might not be for everyone. Some reviewers found it a little too light, and thought it ended up on the wrong side of that fine line between peppy and finicky, with an oversensitive transmission.

When you take it for a test drive, it might also be worth paying attention to the cornering. Reviewers agree that it corners well, but the all-around zippy feeling of the drive might have you lurching around corners harder than you expect, until you get used to it.

On the higher-end Ti and TL models you’ll also find some features that can affect your driving experience. Most of these high-end-only features, such as auto-levelling headlights, will make for a better drive without you noticing them. Others might be more apparent.

How does the X-Trail do off-road?

The X-Trail is very suitable for light off-tarmac duties, such as snowy roads or dirt tracks, and will most likely handle about as reliably as you’d expect, with its customary lightness.

The design suggests it’s not meant for rougher stuff though. The low front bumper, and long overhang between the front of the car and the front wheels, limits its function off-road compared to other SUVs in its class.

It also comes with a space-saver spare tyre rather than full sized. Without your own full-sized spare, a puncture may see you limping. That’s not something you want off the tarmac.

On the plus side, you can lock in an even power distribution between the front and gear axles at 40km/h. This is can help keep traction if you’re driving on slippery surfaces.

Other features include Nissan’s “intelligent ride control,” which might manifest as a smoother experience on undulating surfaces, and “intelligent trace control”, an important and now relatively standard feature that allows selective braking of individual wheels for improved traction.

The X-Trail is rated for a 1,500kg (braked) towing capacity with the 2.5L petrol engine, and 1,650kg with the diesel. This is probably slightly lighter than most other medium SUVs.

Drivetrain options

The ST gives you the most freedom to choose a cheaper option, with 2WD and 2L manual 6-speed transmission, but all variants also let you go higher-end with 4x4 and the CVT. This can let you cut costs on unwanted features, while still getting the driveability you want.

ModelFront wheel drive4x4Manual transmissionAutomatic Xtronic continuously variable transmission
STdonedonedonedone
TScleardonecleardone
ST-Ldonedonecleardone
Ticleardonecleardone
TLcleardonecleardone

Interior and other features

Safety and technology features

For the most part, by 2017 standards, you’re getting a pretty basic technology package with the ST and TS, while the Ti and TL offer a lot more. The ST-L tends to sit in the middle.

  • Nissan Around-View Monitor. Four cameras give a 360 degree view of the car’s surroundings and create a composite digital image. This lets you fully check all around the car at a glance.
  • Intelligent emergency braking. All models have this. The onboard computer can detect imminent collisions, sound an audible warning and hit the brakes faster than you could react. It’s mostly for multi-vehicle collisions, but the Ti and TL can also detect pedestrians. Ideally you won’t get to experience this technology.
  • Rear cross-traffic alerts. While reversing, this warns of vehicles approaching from within 20m on either side of the car.
  • Blind spot warning. Audio warning of vehicles in your blind spot, diagonally behind the car.
  • Intelligent cruise control. Cruise control that automatically adjusts speeds to help keep pace with traffic conditions.
  • Lane departure warning. Audio warning if you’re drifting from your lane.
  • Intelligent lane intervention. Automatic adjustments if you’re drifting from your lane.
STTSST-LTiTL
Around-View Monitorclearcleardonedonedone
Intelligent emergency brakingdonedonedonedonedone
Intelligent emergency braking with pedestrian detectionclearclearcleardonedone
Rear cross-traffic alertsclearcleardonedonedone
Blind spot warningclearcleardonedonedone
Intelligent cruise controlclearclearcleardoneclear
Lane departure warningclearclearcleardonedone
Intelligent lane interventionclearclearcleardoneclear

The interior

The interior design might be where the X-Trail comes to life as a Swiss Army knife for the whole family.

If you’re after a high-quality yet good value 7-seat people-mover, or want to carry a lot of cargo plus the driver and up to 4 passengers, then the X-Trail might be exactly what you’re looking for.

The standard is a 5-seat layout, while the ST and ST-L both offer a 7-seat configuration as well. The 7-seater variant is only available with the 2.5L petrol engine. Fortunately that’s probably the one you want, unless you have your heart set on diesel.

Being able to pack in 7 seats is probably one of the highlights of the range, and one of the reasons the X-Trail has sold as well as it has. This adds a third row of seating in the back, but at the cost of storage space.

The least expensive 7-seat option would be the 2WD ST, listed at $31,990. For many people, this makes it a very attractive combination of price, practicality and quality.

Your interior and storage space will naturally vary depending on the seating layout.

The 5-seater model offers up a spacious 565L of storage with the seats up, and a mid-standard 945L with the second row folded flat. With all three rows of seats up, the 7-seater leaves you with only 135L of storage, up to 825L with all three rows folded down.

Climb into the second row back seats and you might be struck by how nice and spacious it is, even if seated three across. The same can’t be said for the third row in the 7-seater model. This is definitely best reserved for kids. Having said that, there are no head-level rear airbags in the third row.

In a nice touch, the second row can also be shifted forwards or backwards for legroom, and it’s also a bit higher than the front seats for a good view. Taller passengers might be a bit low on headroom there though, especially if you’ve chosen to add a space-stealing sunroof to your Ti or TL.

Overall, as long as you have enough headroom, those second row back seats provide an all-around great ride for passengers, marred only very slightly by the lack of USB or power connections.

The X-Trail is well ventilated with rear seat air vents, although there’s no separate back seat climate control.

As you climb the price range, you start getting what you pay for in the interior. The touch-screen gets bigger, cheaper plastic starts giving way to leather and you get more variations in seat adjustment.

In all models, you might notice a handful of neat touches, like an easily-navigable touch-screen design, an oversized sun visor and broad, comfortable seats for long trips.

Other features might bother you, such as the easy-to-overlook parking brake that is operated with a left foot pedal, or not being able to access your phone through the car touch-screen.

Price and value for money

There’s no price penalty for new 2017 X-Trail models, and some are cheaper than previous versions.

Overall, the X-Trail sits in a similar price range to other SUVs in its class, with certain variations having a bit of an advantage.

In particular, you might find good value for money compared to other diesel SUVs, other 7-seat SUVs, or vehicles that offer a similar range of electronics and features.

ModelPrice range
ST$27,990 - $33,980
TS (diesel)$35,380 - $35,680
ST-L$36,590 - $39,490
Ti$44,290 - $45,190
TL (diesel)$46,280 - $47,290

Compare some options to finance a Nissan X-Trail

Rates last updated May 28th, 2018
$
Name Product Interest Rate (p.a.) Comparison Rate (p.a.) Min Loan Amount Loan Term Monthly Service Fee Application Fee Product Description Monthly Repayment
Stratton Finance New Car Loan
From 5.29% (fixed)
6.56%
$18,000
1 to 7 years
$8.90
$459.20
Apply for up to $100,000 and have up to 7 year(s) to repay. You can use cash or trade in a vehicle to use as a deposit.
IMB New Car Loan
5.99% (fixed)
6.34%
$2,000
1 to 7 years
$0
$250
Borrow up to $75,000 for a new car up to two years old. Competitive 5.99% p.a. rate available to all approved applicants.
RACV New Car Loans
From 5.99% (fixed)
6.53%
$15,000
1 to 7 years
$0
$380
A competitive rate car loan from RACV with no monthly fees and 5-hour loan approval.
MyState Secured Personal Loan
From 7.99% (variable)
8.96%
$10,000
1 to 10 years
$10
$200
Apply for a loan up to $75,000 and benefit from loan terms up to 10 years. Your choice between secured or unsecured.
CUA Secured Fixed Car Loan
6.79% (fixed)
6.92%
$5,000
1 to 7 years
$0
$0
A competitive car loan for new or used vehicles up to 7 years old that offers flexible repayment options and no account keeping fees.
Heritage Bank Car Loan
From 8.99% (fixed)
9.62%
$5,000
1 to 7 years
$5
$200
Apply for up to $100,000 to finance a new or used car at a competitive fixed rate.
IMB Secured Personal Loan
6.89% (fixed)
7.24%
$2,000
1 to 5 years
$0
$250
All approved applicants can access this competitive rate and use the loan to finance a range of purposes. Loan amounts up to $60,000 available.
Westpac Car Loan
8.49% (fixed)
9.67%
$10,000
1 to 7 years
$12
$250
Finance a new or used car and benefit from great features for car buyers including a car search tool and the option to borrow extra for on-road costs. Borrow funds to purchase a new or used car before 28 June 2018 and receive a $200 fuel voucher.

Compare up to 4 providers

Pictures: Nissan

Car Loan Offers

Important Information*
Stratton Finance New Car Loan

Apply for up to $100,000 and have up to 7 year(s) to repay. You can use cash or trade in a vehicle to use as a deposit.

IMB New Car Loan

Borrow up to $75,000 for a new car up to two years old. Competitive 5.99% p.a. rate available to all approved applicants.

RACV New Car Loans

A competitive rate car loan from RACV with no monthly fees and 5-hour loan approval.

CUA Secured Fixed Car Loan

A competitive car loan for new or used vehicles up to 7 years old that offers flexible repayment options and no account keeping fees.

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com.au:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com.au is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.
Ask a question
Go to site